Week-in-Review: Free Trade vs. Fair Trade.. With China, Russia, Mexico

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Welcome to the first MetalMIner Week-in-Review of 2017!

This week, trade issues came to the forefront as President-elect Donald Trump, now just two weeks from his inauguration, named veteran trade lawyer and former Reagan administration official Robert Lighthizer as his U.S. Trade Representative.

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While nobody could accuse China of getting a free ride from the current administration, I think it’s safe to say the U.S. Trade Rep’s office website won’t have an endorsement of the Trans-Pacific Partnership on it come January 20th.

Michigan or Michoacan?

Who gets hurt the most by a bunch of fair trade hardliners coming into office with Trump? It might look like Mexico right now — Ford Motor Company just pulled up stakes on a new facility there and instead invested in Michigan — but it’s actually China, as the U.S. trade deficit with them is our largest and the director of Trump’s National Trade Council, Peter Navarro, is a longtime critic of the way the People’s Republic trades with the U.S. and the entire world. Expect Navarro, Lighthizer and Commerce Secretary nominee Wilbur Ross to set their sights squarely on China’s trade with the U.S.

Also, China says it’s really serious about cleaning up its dirty steel mills and smelters this time.

From Russia with Hard-to-Find Oil

President-elect Trump has had mostly good things to say about Russia and he’s even boasted that he’d “get along well” with Russian Federation President Vladimir Putin, despite intelligence community accusations that Russia “hacked” the recent election by providing information from the Democratic National Committee and Democratic Nominee Hillary Clinton’s campaign manager, John Podesta, to organizations such as Wikileaks for wide distribution and dissemination. Trump may get tested early on that Russian reset, anyway, because Russia is already reclassifying its biggest shale oil find to avoid sanctions placed on the federation when it annexed Crimea.

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If Russia can avoid sanctions on its oil exports what will that say about any other country thumbing its nose at international law? Interesting trade times coming up.

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