Articles in Category: Ferrous Metals

Last month we reported that in March, U.S. domestic steel prices generally rose while the GOES M3 price fell. This month, we can safely report the exact opposite price change. U.S. domestic steel prices fell while GOES prices rose in April.

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In our April update, MetalMiner indicated that GOES prices might find a price floor on the back of a large 20,000/mt tender from Bharat Heavy Electricals. That indeed appears to have happened. Moreover, according to a recent TEX Report, GOES prices have continued to climb in China as Baoshan Iron & Steel needs to service the domestic market due to anti-dumping cases preventing Japanese and Korean imports to that market.

The TEX Report also suggests that global inventories remain low and that many countries have come into the market all at the same time, requiring material. This could lead to higher prices, particularly from the Japanese mills for contracts awarded during the second half of the year.

The Gorilla in the Room

The real challenge for domestic GOES prices, however, rests on the results of the Section 232 steel product investigation launched by the Trump administration in late April. The results will likely not come much before January 22, 2018, assuming the Secretary of Commerce takes the allowable 270 days to present findings to the President. At its core, the investigation seeks to address the issue of

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Here’s What Happened

  • The Construction MMI, tracking metals and raw materials used within the construction industry, slipped 1.3% to a value of 79 for May.
  • Chinese steel prices — for forms such as rebar and H-beam — dropped precipitously this month.
  • Based on the last few months’ values, the last time this sub-index has performed this well was the start of 2015 — back when California was the first state to pass a carbon tax and Bill Gates turned human waste into potable water.

What’s Going On in the Background?

  • We’re in the salad days for the U.S. construction sector, at least as far as 2017 is concerned. According to the Associated General Contractors’ analysis, “Construction spending is at record levels for the second straight month in March [in spite of the month’s slip] and is up 4.9% for the first three months of year compared to the same period in 2016,” as quoted by com.
  • Better days for Chinese construction markets may be coming down the pike as well. Beijing recently announced plans to build a new megacity “the size of New England,” which should result in quite the appetite for industrial-grade steel, aluminum and other materials. For example, the government approved $36 billion to build 700 miles of rail within the next three years, according to this article. More salad days for the global construction industry to come, perhaps?

What Metal Buyers Should Look Out For

  • The latest drops in Chinese steel prices may have a knock-on effect on U.S. and other Western steel, which make the latter ‘pricier,’ comparatively. This could lead to lower prices on both sides of the ocean hanging around for a while.
  • We’ll see if President Trump’s 232 investigation begins to have any medium-term effect on steel once the determinations come down on whether imports constitute a threat to national security. In the meantime, “iron ore and Chinese steel prices could recover if China cuts overcapacity later this year,” as we write in our latest Monthly Outlook Report. (Free two-month trial here.)

Key Price Movers and Shakers

  • The China rebar price plummeted, the U.S. shredded scrap price fell below a key threshold to start the month for the third time this year, and weekly U.S. bar fuel surcharges for the Midwest, Gulf Coast and Rocky Mountain regions all fell slightly from April to May. Exact numbers in the membership-only article:
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No one factor has led to the turnaround in the fortunes of Europe’s steelmakers. While still not spectacular, global growth is certainly broader-based and better distributed that it was a few years ago. The fortunes of the European steel industry have improved markedly since their low point in late 2015, with prices rising some 45%, according to Reuters.

As with virtually every ferrous and non-ferrous metal, China has been a key component. Responsible for over 50% of global production capacity, China’s steel industry was undoubtedly a contributor to low prices around the middle of the decade. Beijing’s decision to cut capacity while boosting infrastructure spending has certainly resulted in increased domestic demand and reduced Chinese exports.

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China announced its intention to cut 100 to 150 million tons of steel capacity by 2020 in part to tackle pollution. It was also to address a rising tide of protectionism around the world fearful of the impact China’s excess supply was having on producers in home markets. According to Reuters, China cut 60 million tons of steel capacity last year and plans to cut another 50 million tons this year. There remains considerable debate as to how much of last year’s capacity closures really curtailed production and how much was simply the permanent closure of already mothballed or idle plants.

But either way, in conjunction with the $700-billion stimulus package targeted mostly at infrastructure and construction, Chinese steel prices jumped over 70% last year, while exports fell 3.5%. Even better news for overseas producers has been exports dropped a further 25% this year in part many would argue due to some 39 anti-dumping and anti-subsidy measures introduced in Europe over recent years of which 17 are directed at China and some 150 similar duties in place in the U.S. Read more

Liquid steel.

Photollug/Adobe Stock

This morning in metals, a big trade finding from last Friday is making the news.

The U.S International Trade Commission (ITC) found that imports of carbon and alloy cut-to-length steel plate from steelmakers in 8 different countries officially harms U.S. manufacturers, thereby “locking in” duties imposed by U.S. Commerce in March for five years, according to Reuters.

According to the ITC’s site and the Reuters report following shortly after the release, the finding applies to cut-to-length plate from Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan.

The exact anti-dumping duties Commerce imposed on eight producers’ products in March range “from 3.62 percent to 148 percent…while imports from South Korea would also face a countervailing duty of 4.31 percent,” according to Reuters. Much more detail on those duties in this MetalMiner report.

What Does It Mean for Steel Plate Prices and Buyers?

“We anticipate the dumping order will help provide support to U.S. domestic prices, at least in the short term,” said Lisa Reisman, executive editor of MetalMiner, “as the case included a fairly broad number of both European and Asian suppliers.”

In many cases, Reisman mentioned, the duty rate appears significant, which will curtail imports from both specific countries and specific producers.

From a short-term pricing perspective, according to Reisman, steel prices have slid across the board this past week, but “certainly this trade case will help support plate prices,” she said.

“Interestingly enough,” she concluded, “according to analysis conducted by Steel Market Update, domestic cut to length plate exports are at their highest level since May 2015.”

Here’s What Happened

  • The Renewables MMI spiked upwards for the month of May (but not a terribly huge spike in the scheme of things; see the bullet below), ending at a value of 71.
  • * Editor’s note: We’ve recalibrated the index to better take into account cobalt price fluctuations, hence the spike from 54 in April to 71 in May.
  • However, the Big Heavy of our sub-index that tracks metals and materials going into the renewable energy industry is the U.S. steel plate price. That price point took a 4.8% dive.

What’s Going On in the Background?

  • Several stories from the solar sector have been making waves lately. “Growth has slowed in the rooftop solar industry in the past year,” writes Jessica Goodheart in this piece, “but many see the evolution of battery storage technology and vehicle electrification as promising for the long-term health of the residential solar industry.”
  • And the policy picture? “Industry leaders have been cautiously optimistic that Republicans will leave be the federal Solar Investment Tax Credit (ITC), a major policy driver of rooftop solar, in spite of Trump’s efforts to roll back the Clean Power Plan,” Goodheart notes.

What Metal Buyers Should Look Out For

  • Keep an eye out on steel plate’s raw material inputs — iron ore prices surged in April, as we reported in our May Monthly Buying Outlook, while coking coal prices swelled due to supply disruptions in Australia.

Key Price Movers and Shakers

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President Donald J. Trump has completed his first 100 days in office and thus far has signed into law 28 pieces of legislation.

While Trump has made traction in some respects, the fate of the nation’s steel industry was still up in the air — that is, until Trump signed a Presidential Memorandum in late April calling on Department of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to prioritize an investigation into the effects of steel imports on U.S. national security.

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Here are three things you should know about this directive and what it could mean for the nation’s steel industry.

The Trade Expansion Act of 1962

The investigation is being conducted under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962. According to the Department of Commerce, Ross is tasked with determining the following:

  • “Whether steel imports cause American workers to lose jobs needed to meet security requirements of the domestic steel industry;
  • Any negative effects of steel imports on government revenue; and
  • Any harm steel imports cause to the economic welfare of the U.S.”

The Current Situation

Despite an existing steel industry, steel imports saw a 19.6% year-over-year increase in February, and, currently, imported steel accounts for 26% of the U.S. market share, according to the Department of Commerce.

Further, the U.S. steel industry is only operating at 71% capacity, and jobs in the industry has continued to take a steady hit. Read more

Here’s What Happened

  • The Automotive MMI, our sub-index of industrial metals and materials used by the automotive sector, dropped by one point for a May reading of 8, a 1.1% drop.
  • This is the third straight month of declines for this index. Back in February 2017, the Automotive MMI hit 92 — its highest level since November 2014. But now, flagging HDG steel, copper and shredded scrap prices are dragging on the rest of the index.

What’s Going On in the Background?

  • The U.S. auto market is officially slowing. Car sales dropped 4.7% to 1.43 million units, according to Autodata Corp. That is a bigger drop than forecasted by both Edmunds and Kelly Blue Book, according to several news outlets.
  • Meanwhile in China, the first quarter of 2017 saw a 7% overall increase in car sales. As we reported in our Monthly Metal Buying Outlook (free trial here), that was the strongest showing since 2014. The Chinese government has extended tax cuts for small vehicles, which should keep citizens buying cars through the year.

What Metal Buyers Should Look Out For

  • Many factors coming down the line — including increased construction projects in China — portend longer-term support for key automotive constituent metals such as HDG steel.
  • Even though HDG has slipped a bit this month, prices for that metal form in China could see room for improvement.

Key Price Movers and Shakers

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Our Raw Steels MMI fell seven points* due to the slump in China’s steel prices in April.

Raw Steels MMI

(*Note: We changed one of the data elements of our index to map the underlying market more effectively. That change contributed to a lower number this month.)

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Since their peak in February, China’s steel prices have fallen by more than 20%, while U.S. prices have continued to climb. But guess what, things changed towards the end of April. Prices in China started to recover (see how we predicted that) while U.S. prices fell (yes, we predicted that too). In this post, I’ll analyze what this price divergence means and how you — assuming you buy or invest in steel — can take advantage of it.

China HRC price. Source:MetalMiner IndX

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In preparing our new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook for May, we’ve seen that prices in both industrial metal markets and commodity markets have fallen over the past month.

What’s the deal?

Well, a few things are happening that stirred up that pot:

  • The U.S. dollar fell to a five-month low. The dollar’s movement usually has an inverse relationship with that of commodity prices, but not lately. Election season across the pond in France is heating up, and the outcome of the first round of presidential voting had eased concerns about the future of the euro, which rose against the dollar.
  • Interestingly, China’s annual GDP growth increased to 6.9% during Q1 2017, the fastest growth rate since the second half of 2015. Not only that, but the country also announced that it will build a “new megacity” — two things that would usually portend higher industrial metals prices. And yet…here’s what China’s economy has been doing since 2012 (the overall trend is pretty clear):

  • President Trump ordered two investigations, one for steel and one for aluminum, into whether imports of those metals threaten U.S. national security.

Check out how these types of events and trends are affecting six non-ferrous metal markets and four specific forms of steel — HRC, CRC, HDG and plate — in our detailed monthly analysis.

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India’s steel story continues to shine. The country’s consumption of finished steel goods is expected to grow by 6.1% in 2017 compared with 2016.

According to the World Steel Association (WSA), India’s steel product demand could reach 88.6 million tons in 2017, up from 83.5 million tons in 2016. WSA was also quite positive on India’s steel demand in 2018, projecting a growth of 7.1% to 94.9 million tons.

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Steel consumption in India’s neighboring country China, however, would remain flat in 2017. The WSA estimated a 2% slump in demand for 2018.

The Indian Steel Association, too, has said publicly that the country was well on its way to becoming the second largest consumer of steel, beating the United States to the second spot.

The WSA said in its report that the U.S. was expected to continue to lead the growth in the developed work in 2017-18, based on strong fundamentals, newly announced measures related to fiscal stimuli, and rising infrastructure spending. It has estimated that steel demand in the U.S. will grow by 3% in 2017 to 94.3 million tons and then by 2.9% in 2018 to 97.1 million tons.

Free Download: The April 2017 MMI Report

In India, in a further fillip to steel production, the government was contemplating making the use of Indian steel compulsory in all government or public sector funded projects. This would raise the per-capita consumption from 61 kilograms (134.5 pounds) to 160 kilograms (353 pounds) and increase production from 120 million ton to 300 million ton by 2030. The indication of this was recently given by Union Minister for Steel Chaudhary Birender Singh.

After reviewing the performance of Rashtriya Ispat Nigam Limited (RINL), the minister told reporters that “stringent measures” like imposing anti-dumping duty and minimum import price (MIP) had led to imports falling by 39% and exports increasing by 57%.

He added that the India’s national policy on steel would be unveiled soon, after receiving approval of the Union Cabinet.

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The move to make use of “Make in India” steel mandatory by government bodies comes in the wake of the central government’s commitment to support the domestic steel sector, which has been incurring losses during the last couple of years due to excess production and dumping of steel products from China into India.

Incidentally, India was aiming for a steel production capacity of 300 million tons by 2030, while the current capacity is 120 million tons and production was 90 million tons.