Articles in Category: Global Trade

Unlike the U.S., which has retained a paper $1 bill, the U.K. did away with the venerable pound sterling banknote in 1983, replacing it with a round dual-metal, £1 coin much to the disgust of traditionalists.

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Broadly speaking though, the £1 coin has been relatively successful in terms of longevity compared to the paper note. The former has lasted 40 years but the latter about nine months, but at a cost, the British one pound (£) coin has suffered from high levels of counterfeiting.

One pound coin

The new £1 coin, now with security features! Source: the Royal Mint.

There are thought to be more than 30 million fake £1 coins in circulation, adding up to 2.55% of coins according to a recent article in The Sun newspaper. The current pound coin is made up of 70% copper, 24.5% zinc and 5.5% nickel — weighing a mere 9.5 grams. The coin also has a diameter of 22.5 mm (7/8 inch) and a thickness of 3.15 mm (1/8 inch). The new pound coin is also constructed from two different colored metals like the old one, but the new version contains an iSIS security feature (a new high-security coinage currency system developed by The Royal Mint). Read more

The seesaw battle between steelmakers in China and India took a new twist recently with a report in a Chinese newspaper calling the Indian government on its “protectionist” stance on steel.

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The state-run Global Times newspaper said in a report, referring to India’s decision to award its first bullet train project to Japan, that India needed to have a “sober” look vis-a-vis China when it came to solutions for India’s proposed railway network revamp or its entirely new high-speed rail project.

The high-speed “bullet train” project is likely to commence in 2018 on a 315-mile (508-kilometer) route between Mumbai and Ahmedabad. It’s slated to be completed by 2023.

India has been waging a war against cheap steel imports into the country for some time now, with Chinese steel companies high on their bad guy list. The government imposed taxes in various forms not to protect its own steel industry, but to equalize import prices to production costs. Over 80% of the funding for the project is coming from Japanese investments. Read more

Did you honestly think it had gone away? In the week that the U.K. government is set to announce article 50, formally notify its European partners that it plans to leave the E.U. within two years, we’re reminded of the ongoing political process which is likely to add significant volatility in the year ahead.

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The U.K.’s (or at least Great Britain’s, Scotland is vowing to hold its own referendum on staying in the U.K.) decision to leave the E.U. will have far-reaching consequences but, realistically, does not look likely to signal a breakup of the E.U. itself. Recent elections in the Netherlands saw a swing back to liberal pro-E.U. political parties and a rejection of more xenophobic and anti-E.U. sentiments as espoused by Geert Wilders and his Party for Freedom. Although she is likely to do well in the first round, the Dutch result does not bode well for Marine Le Pen in the upcoming French elections with pro-E.U. parties doing well in the polls. The E.U., politically, is currently showing a united front particularly in its pre-negotiating stance with the U.K.

Clean Break? Or Regulatory Cooperation?

Britain, on the other hand, is waging what can the politely be called an internal debate between those who are lobbying for a hard Brexit or clean break from all E.U. laws and institutions, and those on the other side taking a more pragmatic view that it could be in Britain’s interest (if it genuinely wants some form of open access to E.U. markets) to maintain compliance with many E.U. regulations and institutions. Read more

This part two of our sit down with Steel Manufacturers Association President Philip K. Bell at the recent S&P Global Platts Steel Markets North America conference here in Chicago. Bell currently serves on the Department of Commerce International Trade Advisory Committee on Steel (ITAC 12), advising the Secretary of Commerce and United States Trade Representative on trade policy, trade agreements, and other trade related matters that benefit U.S. businesses, workers, and the economy.

Jeff Yoders: You mentioned that the proposed border-adjustment tax is something you have to be very, very careful about.

Philip K. Bell: Ironically, when I look at things the administration should prioritize, I would really like to see infrastructure rise higher on that top five list as opposed to things like a healthcare repeal because that’s one clear way that you can jump start the steel industry.

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Philip K. Bell

Philip K. Bell. Source: SMA

The steel industry, to me, if you look at it in the simplest terms, is based on cost and demand. You can help lower steel producers’ costs by reducing taxes and regulatory burdens, but you can increase demand by having this $1 trillion infrastructure plan and that would be very important. Making sure you deal with countries that dump, subsidize exports, etc. would also help.

JY: Using countervailing duties, anti-dumping duties and the existing tools commerce has, right?

PB: Right.

JY: I asked Chad Utermark, executive vice president of Nucor, what, exactly, their representatives had heard about when we might get to see the ideas for an infrastructure bill precisely because of that. This seems like a slam dunk for economic growth for all the industries that support construction. Why isn’t it being pushed more?

PB: We certainly would like to see infrastructure investment made a higher priority. I love the idea of public-private partnerships. The P3 approach is good, you’re going to bring better managerial skill with people who can manage the entire supply chain of infrastructure investment. Keep in mind, infrastructure can be financed this way, but it also needs to be funded (to an extent by the government). There are some infrastructure projects that are very important but might not appeal to private investors. They might not be easy to get done. Read more

We had a chance to sit down and discuss the issues facing members of the Steel Manufacturers Association with SMA President Philip K. Bell at the recent S&P Global Platts Steel Markets North America conference here in Chicago. Bell also currently serves on the  Department of Commerce International Trade Advisory Committee on Steel (ITAC 12), advising the Secretary of Commerce and United States Trade Representative on trade policy, trade agreements, and other trade related matters that benefit U.S. businesses, workers, and the economy.

Philip K. Bell

Philip K. Bell. Source: SMA

Jeff Yoders: We’ve heard a lot about North American Free Trade Agreement and what changes to it might mean in the last two days. How do your members feel about reopening NAFTA to changes?

Philip K. Bell: NAFTA is over 20 years old and it’s probably time to look at it again. A lot has changed over the last two decades. We hope the approach that the administration takes is one that’s more methodical and takes into account that not only are Canada and Mexico two of our biggest trade partners but, when it comes to the steel industry, they ARE our two largest trade partners.

There is a lot of integration in this area. You have a lot of steel producers that either have businesses in Mexico such as Gerdau, ArcelorMittal and Nucor — through its joint venture JFE — and you have a lot of companies that want to do business there like Steel Dynamics which is hoping to increase its presence in that market by importing flat-rolled into Mexico. Read more

The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries in general, and Saudi Arabia in particular, have done the U.S. oil industry a massive favor, and they are probably ruing the day they tried to squeeze America’s shale industry out of existence.

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The collapse in oil prices that ensued after Saudi Arabia-led OPEC opened the spigots two years ago forced American companies, and their many subcontractors, to innovate in a way that would never have happened so fast or gone so far without the imminent threat of survival forcing the pace.

Oil Prices Allow Reopening of Old Wells

Now, U.S. shale producers have achieved economies of scale that allow them to return to previously closed wells in fields like Eagle Ford and achieve 30% returns even at $40 a barrel. U.S. explorers may be making hay in the domestic market, but huge potential exists for these same firms to take their technology abroad. Read more

Late last week, Indian media was rife with reports of Vedanta Resources PLC Chairman Anil Agarwal making a “surprise” bid for about 13% of mining giant Anglo American PLC for $2.4 billion, even as the British newspapers headlined the development as a “raid.” Anglo American owns De Beers, one of the world’s largest diamond exploration and mining companies.

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The move to acquire the shares was made through Agarwal’s personal investment firm Volcan Investments in London.

Here’s the lowdown on Anglo American: The U.K.-headquartered Group, with operations in South Africa, North and South America, Asia and Europe, has revenue of $23 billion, EBITDA (earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization) amount to $6.1 billion, and it has a market value of over $20 billion. In addition to diamonds, Anglo is a global player in platinum and base metals and minerals — it mines copper, nickel, niobium and phosphates. It also sells commodities such as iron ore and manganese, metallurgical coal and thermal coal.

When the 13% shares are acquired, Agarwal’s Volcan will be the second-biggest shareholder after the South African Government investment firm Public Investment Corp., which owns 14%. Volcan, said news reports. Volcan intends to finance the investment through mandatory exchangeable bonds. Led by JPMorgan Chase & Co., the bond sale will take place on or around April 11, the closing date.

Agarwal is the founder of Vedanta but he said he doesn’t intend to make a takeover offer for Anglo American, though a merger between the two failed last year. Incidentally, in 2010, Vedanta acquired Anglo American’s portfolio of zinc assets in Namibia, South Africa and Ireland.

Agarwal told the Sunday Times that he “liked” Anglo’s entire balanced portfolio, both in South Africa and elsewhere.

Some years ago, through his entities, Agarwal had also signed an agreement with the South African government for sharing mining technology.

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He said he would be “fully supportive of the board, management and strategy”.

Metal trader turned mining tycoon Agarwal started as a scrap dealer way back in 1975, and his has been a rags to riches story so far but we’ll have to wait and see if his interest in Anglo American is more than just that of a minority investor.

Chinese steel exports tumbled to a three-year low in February, customs data showed last week, lower than expectations, as steelmakers in the world’s top producer shifted to meeting rising demand at home.

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Shipments for the month were 5.75 million metric tons, the lowest since February 2014, data from the General Administration of Customs showed. It was down 29.1% from a year ago and down 22.5% from January.

Duterte Wants Mining Compromise

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte said recently he hopes there will be a “happy compromise” between the mining industry and protecting the environment, throwing support to Environment and Natural Resources Secretary Regina Lopez will appear before Congress ahead of her confirmation hearing. Lopez is under pressure because she has closed nearly half the nation’s mines.

The U.S. dollar fell sharply last Wednesday against a basket of currencies as the Federal Reserve announced a rate increase of a quarter point.

US Dollar index: Source @stockcharts.com.

The move seems to contradict common economic wisdom. In theory, higher raters in the U.S. should make the dollar more attractive for yield-seeking investors when interest are rates are lower around the globe. Then, what caused the currency to weaken?

All About Expectations

A rate increase came as no surprise to U.S. markets. The real surprise came in the language that wrapped the announcement. Fed officials intend to keep raising rates, however they want to keep the economy from getting too hot… but also not too cold.

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Investors were probably betting on an acceleration in the path of raising interest rates, not a warming down. Read more

We haven’t heard much of late about President Donald Trump’s border adjustment tax, but that doesn’t mean to say it has gone away.

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Indeed, the fact that it has a measure of support in the Republican Party suggests it could be on the agenda in the not-too-distant future. The idea is to transform the corporate tax landscape from a system that has prevailed for nearly 100 years, in which profits are taxed at the place of production, to a system in which profits are taxed at the place of sale.

A-destination based cash flow tax (DBCFT), as proposed by the House Republican tax plan, would include border adjustments that exempt exports but include imports in tax bills rather than raising federal income from a corporate income tax. As William Gale, a senior fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution explained in a recent article, all advanced countries except the U.S. already have a form of value-added tax (VAT), generally levied on top of corporate income taxes. All of those VAT systems are border adjusted, such that goods that are imported are taxed and those that are exported are not.

BAT or VAT

As part of the president’s pledge to bring jobs back to America, the border tax could have much to commend it. For example, if the U.S. introduces the system unilaterally, a factory in Ohio will pay no tax on the goods it exports to the E.U. while a factory in the E.U. will pay the border tax on its exports to the U.S. If you are a multinational corporation, suddenly it makes a ton more sense to have your new factory based in Ohio rather than some “lower cost” location. Read more