Articles in Category: Imports

As I pointed out two weeks ago, U.S. steel prices had no choice but to decline as the spread between U.S. and international prices had widened to unsustainable levels.

Two-Month Trial: Metal Buying Outlook

That’s exactly what I’ve seen so far in May, and I suspect that the recent price decline is just the beginning of a deeper correction that could easily extend to the rest of the second quarter.

U.S. hot-rolled coil prices fall in May. Source: MetalMiner IndX

Hot-rolled prices have fallen around 5% since they peaked in April. Meanwhile, steel prices in China have started to stabilize after a slump during March/April. As the chart below shows, the price spread appears to have peaked near the same levels as it did last summer. U.S. steel prices will likely continue to fall, bringing this price arbitrage down.

Hot rolled coil price spread US vs China. Source: MetalMiner IndX

U.S. Steel Imports Hit a Two-Year High

Although the U.S. doesn’t import steel directly from China, Chinese steel prices set the floor for international prices. Therefore, when China’s steel prices fall, imports become more appealing to U.S. buyers. That’s exactly what’s happening now. In March, U.S. steel imports rose 31% year-over-year, hitting the highest level since May 2015. Read more

President Donald Trump has come in for a fair amount of criticism for his perceived failure to achieve many of his campaign promises in the 100-day deadline he set himself (and now denies, but that’s another issue).

Implementation of a case against China as a currency manipulator and building the U.S.-Mexico border wall has given way to the greater pragmatism of coercing China to put pressure on North Korea with both carrot and stick incentives, and of a “last minute” retraction of a supposed imminent announcement to withdraw from the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) last month as a precursor to talks down the line.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

The Economist, as usual, gives an impartial and balanced assessment of events in two recent articles. The first reports that although the president has not been able to implement much of the headline objectives, the combination of executive orders, tweets and off-the-cuff announcements have set in motion a number of significant developments.

Pulling out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) gave a clear message from day one that here was a president who meant what he said — that you took all the bluster as hot air at your peril. The very uncertainty in his lack of planned policy and spur-of-the-moment reaction to events has put trade partners, friends and enemies alike on uncertain ground — not a bad negotiating position to force on the other side, if you see all interaction as a negotiation.

More significantly, the U.S. has started an investigation into whether steel imports are a threat to national security and followed up with a similar probe, announced late last month, into aluminium imports. Trade negotiators at home and abroad are said to be aghast at the former leader of the rules-based trading system and a major backer of the World Trade Organization completely shunning the system it created and resorting to obscure legislation to achieve the president’s promises. Read more

President Donald J. Trump has completed his first 100 days in office and thus far has signed into law 28 pieces of legislation.

While Trump has made traction in some respects, the fate of the nation’s steel industry was still up in the air — that is, until Trump signed a Presidential Memorandum in late April calling on Department of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to prioritize an investigation into the effects of steel imports on U.S. national security.

Two-Month Trial: Metal Buying Outlook

Here are three things you should know about this directive and what it could mean for the nation’s steel industry.

The Trade Expansion Act of 1962

The investigation is being conducted under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962. According to the Department of Commerce, Ross is tasked with determining the following:

  • “Whether steel imports cause American workers to lose jobs needed to meet security requirements of the domestic steel industry;
  • Any negative effects of steel imports on government revenue; and
  • Any harm steel imports cause to the economic welfare of the U.S.”

The Current Situation

Despite an existing steel industry, steel imports saw a 19.6% year-over-year increase in February, and, currently, imported steel accounts for 26% of the U.S. market share, according to the Department of Commerce.

Further, the U.S. steel industry is only operating at 71% capacity, and jobs in the industry has continued to take a steady hit. Read more

The 100-day mark for President Donald Trump’s administration has come and passed. When it comes to the effects of his policies on various markets, only one thing is certain: uncertainty.

That uncertainty also applies to non-ferrous metal markets, which saw a boom in optimism after Trump’s election last year. For example, copper rose to a 15-month high on Nov. 9, 2016. However, that optimism has dwindled through the first few months of his administration, due to lingering uncertainty over the administration’s ability to actuate campaign promises.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

While market fluctuations are a confluence of many forces, beyond what the president does or does not do, the president does have substantial influence, both in word and deed. Thus far, Trump has been more influential in the former, campaigning on a renewed focus on mining (particularly with respect to coal) and significant investment in American infrastructure.

“We are going to fix our inner cities and rebuild our highways, bridges, tunnels, airports, schools, hospitals,” Trump had said during his victory speech in November. “We’re going to rebuild our infrastructure, which will become, by the way, second to none. And we will put millions of our people to work as we rebuild it.” Read more

AdobeStock/khwaneigq

International trade hasn’t been this contentious since before the Great Depression, and it is causing free traders much concern. We’ve seen a number of trade cases affect some U.S. imports such that the U.S. steel industry effectively implemented a full ground stop on many steel products (though that ground stop has been short-lived). Some political appointments have caused a backlash amongst some free-trade Republicans, importers, traders and manufacturers.

FREE REPORT: How Circumvention Impacts Both Downstream, Value-Added Manufacturing

This administration’s stance on trade has helped galvanize both the case for and against trade. These arguments are centered on several themes related to the notion that China’s loss is U.S. value-added manufacturers’ gain — if China chooses to “dump” its products at a loss, then shouldn’t value-added manufacturers take the opportunity to purchase [steel and/or other commodities] to increase their overall cost competitiveness on finished goods?

Read more

Dean A. Pinkert is a partner in Hughes Hubbard’s International Trade practice. He is a former Commissioner of the U.S. International Trade Commission. Pinkert was nominated by President Bush and confirmed by the Senate in 2007, and was designated Vice Chairman by President Obama in 2014.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

As a commissioner, Pinkert participated in numerous anti-dumping, countervailing duty, and safeguard investigations, including the special safeguard investigation of passenger tires that resulted in import relief for the domestic tire industry and was upheld by the World Trade Organization. He participated in an unprecedented number of final determinations in Section 337 investigations during his tenure, notably dissenting in an electronic devices case that went to President for policy review. President Obama, relying on many of the factors cited in the dissent, overruled the commission for the first time since 1987.

Dean Pinkert

Former ITC Vice Chair A. Dean Pinkert. Source: Hughes Hubbard.

Pinkert spoke with MetalMiner Editor Jeff Yoders by phone about several issues facing metals producers and manufacturers, including global steel and aluminum overcapacity and how the new Trump administration can approach trade and overcapacity issues. This is the final post in our three-part series that covers border-adjustment and tax policy.

JY: The reason you might want to avoid a VAT is that it would apply to all transactions, right? It would be on individuals and not companies.

DP: Think of it as the difference between a sales tax in the United States and an income tax. They are completely different. A VAT is essentially a national sales tax. We have sales taxes but the issue we’re talking about is the corporate income tax. If the U.S. adopted a VAT it would be a huge change so the idea here is to stay within the corporate income tax concept, but make some tweaks so that U.S. companies aren’t disadvantaged relative to foreign companies. Because we’re not talking about a VAT, though, you might get a different outcome at the World Trade Organization when it’s challenged by another country.

A VAT would be a big change. We are getting into some areas of policy that I’m not an expert on here, but there are all sorts of other issues that go way beyond the issue, but from a trade perspective the idea of a border adjustment is supposed to neutralize the advantage that VAT tax countries might have in international trade. The WTO may come to the conclusion that, even though a border-adjustment does have some features of a VAT, it’s still not acceptable because it might be viewed as an export subsidy. Read more

This week, President Donald Trump and the Department of Commerce used executive orders, new anti-dumping investigations, memoranda invoking national security concerns and other executive branch tools to get tough on foreign steel imports.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

Although Trump or Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross never overtly stated it, the target is clearly China and the global steel overcapacity that it’s the main culprit in creating. China’s steel exports hit a record 112.4 million metric tons in 2015, then dropped slightly to 108.49 mmt last year, as Chinese mills have been chastened by threats of a trade dispute.

Fre trade

The Trump administration is using every tool in the box on steel overcapacity. Source: Adobe Stock/Argus.

To date, the Global Forum on Steel Overcapacity hasn’t caused overcapacity to come down very much. Can a section 232 investigation or other U.S.-only actions change that? The U.S. steel industry certainly seems to think so. Or it’s at least saying, “why not try?”

Steelmaker executives such as U.S. Steel CEO Mario Longhi and SSAB Americas President Chuck Schmitt flanked Trump and Ross at the memorandum-signing ceremony calling for the Section 232 investigation yesterday. The praise was universal from steel producers as one might expect, too. Still, Trump’s latest salvo on trade will renew concerns that China may retaliate.

China’s Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang said today the country needed to ascertain the direction of any U.S. investigation before it could make a judgment. There’s also the fact that Trump now claims that he and Chinese President Xi Jinping are the best of friends.

Chinese steel executives also repeated their mantra that overcapacity is not just China’s problem and it needs global coordination to resolve it, but also said it would be tough to rein in the sector.

“The Chinese government will not set export limits for the steel mills and could not keep track of every mill,” Li Xinchuang, vice chairman of the China Iron and Steel Association, told Reuters.

What may be more effective is rising steel prices in China and what looks more and more like a very real crackdown on pollution and dirty air in China. An early-year surge in Chinese steel prices has lifted the prices of its export products and China has lost its competitiveness with other markets. With coking coal prices increasing, Chinese steel prices could increase even more, which our Lead Forecasting Analyst, Raul de Frutos, pointed out this week.

Two-Month Trial: Metal Buying Outlook

On a personal note, this will be my last MetalMiner week-in-review. I have thoroughly enjoyed informing all of you wonderful readers and site users about the latest developments in metals markets these last three years. Thank you for taking advantage of our services. It has been an honor.

 

UPDATED 11:47 AM with Comments from President Trump, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and the American Iron & Steel Institute.

President Donald Trump will sign a directive asking for a speedy probe into whether imports of foreign-made steel are hurting U.S. national security, two administration officials told Reuters on Wednesday.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

Trump signed the memorandum related to section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 at the White House with leaders of some domestic steel companies, such as U.S. Steel‘s CEO Mario Longhi and SSAB Americas President Chuck Schmitt in attendance. The law allows the president to impose restrictions on imports for reasons of national security. The order would only task the Commerce Department with starting a probe into the imports and if they, indeed, harm national security. Reuters reported that Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross has already tasked Commerce personnel with starting the probe.

Trump said Ross and Commerce would be back “very, very soon” with recommendations about how to protect the American steel industry. He also repeated campaign trail criticism of the North American Free Trade Agreement and said that farmers in Wisconsin are also suffering from cheap imports of dairy products from Canada.

“Times of crisis call for extraordinary measures. Massive global steel overcapacity has resulted in record levels of dumped and subsidized foreign steel coming into the U.S. and the loss of nearly 14,000 steel jobs,” said Thomas J. Gibson, president and CEO of the American Iron & Steel Institute, the largest trade organization of North American steel producers. “The Administration launching this investigation is an impactful way to help address the serious threat posed by these unfair foreign trade practices, and we applaud this bold action.”

According to Ross, the investigation was “self-initiated” by Commerce and will consider “the domestic production (of steel) needed for the projected national defense requirement” and if domestic industries can meet that requirement. It will also look at “the impact of foreign competition on specific domestic industries and the impact of displacement of domestic product because of foreign imports.”

There are national security implications from imports of steel alloys that are used in products such as the armor plating of ships and require a lot of expertise to create and produce.

The Department of Commerce started investigations of imports of carbon and alloy steel wire rod from Belarus, Italy, South Korea, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Turkey, Ukraine, the United Arab Emirates, and the United Kingdom, and companion countervailing duty investigations of imports of carbon and alloy steel wire rod from Italy and Turkey. The investigations cover hot-rolled products of carbon and alloy steel.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

The alleged dumping margins range from 18.89% (Italy) to 756.93% (Russia) and both of the alleged countervailing subsidies are above de minimis (less than 2%). The U.S. International Trade Commission is scheduled to make its preliminary injury determinations on or before May 12, 2017.

The petitioners are Gerdau Ameristeel US Inc. in Florida, Nucor Corporation based in North Carolina, Keystone Consolidated Industries of Texas, and Charter Steel in Wisconsin.

President Donald Trump (R-N.Y.) is set to sign an executive order this afternoon ordering enforcement and review of the H-1B visa program, popular in the technology industry, on a visit to the headquarters of Snap-On Inc., a tool manufacturer in Kenosha, Wis., according to senior administration officials.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

He will also use what the White House called the “Buy American and Hire American” order to seek changes in government procurement that would boost purchases of American products in federal contracts, with one aim being to help U.S. steelmakers.

The moves show Trump once again using his power to issue executive orders to try to fulfill promises he made last year in his election campaign, in this case to reform U.S. immigration policies and encourage purchases of American products.

“Strong Buy America domestic procurement preferences for federally funded infrastructure projects are vital to the health of the domestic steel industry, and have helped create manufacturing jobs and build American infrastructure,” said Thomas J. Gibson, president and CEO of the American Iron and Steel Institute, the largest trade group for North American steel manufacturers. “The foundation of a strong Buy America program is the longstanding requirement that all iron and steel-making processes occur in the U.S. for a product to be Buy America compliant — from the actual steel production to the finishing processes. This ‘melted and poured’ standard has been successfully applied since 1983 and must continue to be the standard used in federal Buy America rules for steel procurement. We applaud President Trump for affirming his commitment to full and effective enforcement of our Buy America laws, and to addressing the issue of unfairly dumped and subsidized steel, in signing this Executive Order today.”