Articles in Category: M&A Activity

bas121/Adobe Stock

This morning in metals, officials from Thyssenkrupp’s home German state indicated they are confident the merger proposed for the German firm and Tata Steel can be pushed through, a mothballed U.K. steel plant is now back up and running, and Great Lakes steel production picked up last week.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

Time to Make a Deal

Tata Steel and Thyssenkrupp recently came to an agreement to merge their European operations — however, there are still some hurdles to clear in order to seal the deal on the move.

On Wednesday, German officials in North Rhine-Westphalia, the state in which Thyssenkrupp is located, indicated they were confident that management of the company would be able to strike a deal with workers, Reuters reported.

Gupta to Revive Shuttered Former Tata U.K. Facility

Sanjeev Gupta, of Liberty Speciality Steels, re-opened a steel facility Wednesday in the U.K. that was closed by former owner Tata Steel, The Economic Times reported.

Gupta revived a small bloom caster at its Aldwarke works facility in Rotherham, the Times reported. The move comes more than a year and a half after the facility was closed by Tata Steel UK.

Great Lakes Steel Production Up

Production of steel in the Great Lakes region recently got a boost, ticking up 2.7% last week, according to The Northwest Indiana Times.

Free Download: The September 2017 MMI Report

Last week, 684,000 tons of steel were produced in the region, according to the report citing data from the American Iron and Steel Institute (most coming from the northwest Indiana counties of Lake and Porter).

Thyssenkrupp and Tata Steel have finally made it to the altar.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

After 18 months of mostly behind-the-scenes negotiations to resolve several potentially “deal-off” stumbling blocks, all the major issues have been resolved. The two firms have signed a memorandum of understanding to create a 50:50 joint venture based in Amsterdam, Netherlands, called Thyssenkrupp Tata Steel (TTS).

The behemoth will rank second to ArcelorMittal with 21 million tons of annual steel capacity generating sales of €15 billion ($17.8 billion) and employing 48,000 people, The Telegraph reported.

New Focus

TTS will focus on three main production hubs: Ijmuiden in the Netherlands, Duisburg in Germany and Port Talbot in South Wales, the paper reports, Analysts say improved viability will come from cost savings of between €400 million and €600 million a year arising after 2,000 redundancies and another 2,000 jobs going out of the combined business as overlapping operations are removed.

Not surprisingly, TTS sees the value proposition as the enhanced opportunity for the combined group to move its business up the value chain in cooperation rather than competition with each other.

Hans Fischer, Tata Steel Europe’s chief executive, said “We need to focus on higher value products, China has huge overcapacity and there is a risk they will flood the market. The answer is not to compete with them, but try but find a solution where we have products that cannot be produced easily. We need to be a technology leader.”

Tata wriggling out of the old British Steel Pension fund liabilities was the final major hurdle to overcome — albeit to be fair, at considerable cost to the parent — and the willingness of British workers to agree to an end to the final salary scheme and reduced benefits for existing members underlines their desperation for a deal, matched by compromises made in Germany by workers fearful of the prospects of foreign competition with the European steel industry.

But therein lies the dilemma.

Read more

This morning in metals news, a new European steel giant could be coming on the scene, that giant could result in the loss of thousands of jobs and aluminum hits a five-year high ahead of further Chinese supply cuts.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

Tata Steel, ThyssenKrupp Agree to Merge European Operations

The New York Times reported Wednesday that Tata Steel and ThyssenKrupp had agreed to a deal to merge their European steel operations — a merger that has been in the news for more than a year.

According to the report, while there are still some obstacles to completion of the merger, if it goes through the merged operation would make the second-largest steelmaker in Europe, behind only ArcelorMittal.

Merger Could Yield Loss of 4K Jobs

While the potential merger of the Indian steel giant Tata and German firm ThyssenKrupp’s European operations might be cause for celebration for some, it won’t be for a considerable number of workers, according to one report.

The merger of the two firms’ European operations could lead to the loss of 4,000 jobs, according to CNNMoney.

The merger is expected to cut costs by between €400 million and €600 million ($720 million) a year, according to the report.

Aluminum Soars to Five-Year High

Aluminum continued its strong 2017, hitting a five-year high, Reuters reported.

Not surprisingly, news from China has much to do with the rise, as supply cuts are forthcoming from Chinese producer Chinalco, according to the report.

Free Download: The September 2017 MMI Report

LME aluminum traded at $2,191 per ton, its highest since September 2012, according to Reuters.

China Zhongwang is a company that is used to controversy.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

Then again, you don’t get to be the world’s second-largest aluminium extruder in the space of a few years without ruffling a few feathers.

Zhongwang’s attempts to muscle in on the global stage by buying Aleris Corp immediately ran into opposition from U.S. senators. Just this week, Zhongwang USA, an investment firm backed by Zhongwang Group’s chairman and Aleris Corp, announced its intention to extend the deadline for a decision by two weeks to end September, Reuters reported.

Zhongwang USA is not part of Hong Kong-listed China Zhongwang Holdings Ltd, but Liu Zhongtian heads up both companies — a fact that has clouded multiple investigations against one entity or another in recent years.

Read more

gui yong nian/Adobe Stock

This morning in metals news, U.S. steel production is up for the year, copper backed off its three-year high and a U.S. firm extended its merger deal with a Chinese company.

Steel Production Up 3.2%

According to data released by the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI), U.S. raw steel production is up 3.2% in the year to date (through Sept. 2) compared with the same time frame in 2016.

Adjusted production through Sept. 2 amounted to 60,900,000 net tons, up from the 59,025,000 net tons last year to the same point last year.

For the week ending Sept. 2, domestic raw steel production was 1,747,000 net tons, up 8.6% for the same week in 2016 and up 0.4% from the previous week (ending Aug. 26).

Copper Falls Back

After hitting a three-year high, copper fell back slightly from that Wednesday.

LME copper fell 0.3% to $6,880 a ton by 0155 GMT, according to Reuters.

Staying Together

Aluminum and rolled products producer Aleris International extended a merger agreement with Chinese firm Zhongwang USA LLC, according to Platts.

The deal was extended to Sept. 15, according to the report. The deal was previously set to expire Aug. 31.

Before we head into the weekend, let’s take a look back at the week that was.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

  • In case you missed it, our August MMI Report is out. Metals like copper and aluminum hit record highs, and nine of our 10 sub-indexes posted upward movement as a result of a strong July. Will that momentum continue? Check back next month for the September MMI report.
  • Many have predicted a decline for iron ore prices, but as our Stuart Burns wrote on Monday, reports of its demise have been greatly exaggerated. A weak U.S. dollar, combined with strong equities and global GDP, have helped keep iron ore performing well, not to mention Chinese steel and the wider metals market. Read through for Burns’ assessment of the iron ore market.
  • In India, a boom of bauxite production is expected, wrote our Sohrab Darabshaw. In fact, it is expected to more than double by 2021. How is that possible? One reason, Darabshaw writes, is “increased domestic demand for aluminium, which will largely be sourced from the quintupling of land under mining lease in the Odisha province (which has the bulk of India’s bauxite reserves).”
  • One commodity almost everyone is interested in is oil. On Tuesday, Burns wrote about the future of oil prices. But, since this is MetalMiner, after all, those prices also have an effect on metal markets.
  • Everyone loves a good M&A story, and Burns had one earlier this week on the ongoing talks between Indian steel giant Tata Steel and Germany’s ThyssenKrupp. Plus, he touches on ArcelorMittal’s takeover of Italy’s Ilva. Burns writes: “For the first time in years, steelmakers at least seem to have a plan and are actively pursuing it. Whether that plan is to the eventual benefit or detriment of consumers remains to be seen — but a healthier domestic steel industry must certainly be advantageous to all.”
  • How about zinc? Burns wrote about the metal’s rise to $3,000, and the reasons behind zinc’s price hitting its highest point since 2007.
  •  Last week was a busy one for the U.S. Department of Commerce, which handed down preliminary determinations in countervailing duty investigations for both Chinese aluminum and silicon coming from a trio of countries.
  • Back in India, steel exports are on the rise as the Indian government’s protectionist measures seem to be paying off for its domestic industry.
  • Lastly, representatives of the U.S., Canada and Mexico began talks on Wednesday regarding renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the trade deal instituted in 1994. The U.S. is focused on, among other things, bringing down ballooning trade deficits with the two countries (particularly Mexico). The talks are scheduled to continue until Sunday, so check back for updates on the proceedings.

Free Download: The August 2017 MMI Report

Unlike the steel mergers of the mid-noughties, the mergers currently in the news are born out of weakness, not strength, a recent Financial Times article suggests.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

According to the piece, profitability among the continent’s steelmakers plunged from a peak in the third quarter of 2008 — when each ton shipped delivered on average €215 in earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization — to just €46/tonne in the first quarter of 2016, according to calculations by UBS.

The figure has recovered since to about €83/tonne in the first quarter of 2017, but at the cost of 86,000 job losses since the financial crisis and years of losses contributing to the bankruptcy of the continent’s largest steel production plant, Ilva, in Italy.

Source Financial Times

Despite years of suboptimal capacity utilization, there has been limited rationalization of production continentwide, with governments fiercly opposing job losses in their backyard and steelmakers hoping the other guy will make the cuts. Even Ilva is now being taken over by ArcelorMittal rather than closing completely, and following a major investment will be back in production next year.

Source Financial Times

Although the industry acknowledges Europe will never need as much steel as it once did, ArcelorMittal is quoted as saying the industry is looking to governments to do more to stem imports from Russia and China, and facilitate the planned and phased closure of persistently loss-making plants. Less foreign competition and more consolidation is the agenda in the hope fewer more-consolidated steelmakers can achieve greater clout with buyers in a more constrained market, forcing through higher prices.

Source Financial Times

When ArcelorMittal’s takeover of Ilva is complete, the combined entity will control some 30% of European flat-rolled steel production, up from 26.5% for ArcelorMittal now. While Tata Steel’s proposed and much-delayed merger with ThyssenKrupp’s steel division — currently Europe’s second-largest steel producer — would raise their combined market share for hot-rolled flat products to over 20%.

Steel prices are already up nearly 60% from the bottom in 2015 on the back of improved recovery in steel demand and a gradual increase in anti-dumping legislation restricting some types of steel imports into Europe. Producers would like to see this go a lot further, of course, but consumers are fighting to keep the import market open, fearing — with some justification — that more action will reduce competition and result in significantly higher prices.

Free Download: The July 2017 MMI Report

For the first time in years, steelmakers at least seem to have a plan and are actively pursuing it. Whether that plan is to the eventual benefit or detriment of consumers remains to be seen — but a healthier domestic steel industry must certainly be advantageous to all.

Indian billionaire Anil Agarwal’s audacious purchase of 13% of mining giant Anglo American PLC  took the stock markets by surprise last week. But Agarwal, chairman of London-listed Vedanta Resources is known for his bold and sometimes seemingly counter-intuitive acquisitions.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

Agarwal has bought the shares in the name of his family trust Volcan, saying it is just an investment in a “great company with excellent assets,” stating that he had no immediate plans to launch a takeover, according to the Financial Times.

No one believes him, of course, or at least not the part about it just being an investment in a great company with excellent assets. True, the prospect of Agarwal’s Vedanta with a market cap of $2.99 billion, being able to takeover Anglo-American with a market cap of  $20.84 billion (£16.7 billion) is verging on the absurd, but the truth is Agarwal is probably more interested in a seat on the board and the opportunity to influence Anglo-American’s future in South Africa than seriously taking over a group that is seven times the size of his own.

Source: Financial Times

Anglo-American has made no secret of its desire to divest some of its more troublesome South African investments.

Two-Month Trial: Metal Buying Outlook

The political instability and red tape in South Africa has caused the miner problems in recent years and Anglo has already sold two assets to Vedanta including the Gamsberg zinc project in the Northern Cape which Vedanta should bring to production next year. Read more

Late last week, Indian media was rife with reports of Vedanta Resources PLC Chairman Anil Agarwal making a “surprise” bid for about 13% of mining giant Anglo American PLC for $2.4 billion, even as the British newspapers headlined the development as a “raid.” Anglo American owns De Beers, one of the world’s largest diamond exploration and mining companies.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

The move to acquire the shares was made through Agarwal’s personal investment firm Volcan Investments in London.

Here’s the lowdown on Anglo American: The U.K.-headquartered Group, with operations in South Africa, North and South America, Asia and Europe, has revenue of $23 billion, EBITDA (earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization) amount to $6.1 billion, and it has a market value of over $20 billion. In addition to diamonds, Anglo is a global player in platinum and base metals and minerals — it mines copper, nickel, niobium and phosphates. It also sells commodities such as iron ore and manganese, metallurgical coal and thermal coal.

When the 13% shares are acquired, Agarwal’s Volcan will be the second-biggest shareholder after the South African Government investment firm Public Investment Corp., which owns 14%. Volcan, said news reports. Volcan intends to finance the investment through mandatory exchangeable bonds. Led by JPMorgan Chase & Co., the bond sale will take place on or around April 11, the closing date.

Agarwal is the founder of Vedanta but he said he doesn’t intend to make a takeover offer for Anglo American, though a merger between the two failed last year. Incidentally, in 2010, Vedanta acquired Anglo American’s portfolio of zinc assets in Namibia, South Africa and Ireland.

Agarwal told the Sunday Times that he “liked” Anglo’s entire balanced portfolio, both in South Africa and elsewhere.

Some years ago, through his entities, Agarwal had also signed an agreement with the South African government for sharing mining technology.

Two-Month Trial: Metal Buying Outlook

He said he would be “fully supportive of the board, management and strategy”.

Metal trader turned mining tycoon Agarwal started as a scrap dealer way back in 1975, and his has been a rags to riches story so far but we’ll have to wait and see if his interest in Anglo American is more than just that of a minority investor.

The surprise announcement that PSA, holding company for the Peugeot, Citroën and DS brands, is in talks with General Motors to acquire GM’s European Opel and Vauxhall brands has set the cat among the pigeons in European capitals.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

One of the first justifications for any major merger or takeover is the opportunity for cost reduction from economies of scale and consolidation. PSA’s interest in the Opel/Vauxhall brands has some logic to it.

Constructeur Automobile Mondial?

Acquiring the brands would catapult PSA into the major league, closer to Volkswagen and Fiat in terms of automobile sales volume. Not surprisingly, the French publication Le Monde was one of the first to cover the story in depth (site est en francais, mes amis). As the newspaper explains, for GM, Opel and Vauxhall make up only 12% of the company’s production of roughly 12 million vehicles a year, but for PSA an additional 1.2 million units on top of the existing 1.9 million should create considerable opportunity for economies of scale, at least in the European market where PSA currently sells 1.9 million vehicles out of a total production of 3.1 million worldwide.

Will a deal selling Opel/Vauxhall to Peugeot mean more 308s? Source: Adobe Stock/mrivserg.

The worry in European capitals, though, is that those economies will be achieved by closing production facilities. With PSA 14% owned by the French government and Opel a major employer in Germany, the telephone lines between Paris and Berlin have no doubt been humming seeking reassurances that if European approval is to be given, no job losses will result in Germany or France. Read more