Articles in Category: Metal Pricing

Nickel prices reached a 10-month low this week due in part to concern over demand from China, a top consumer of the metal.

According to a report from Reuters, these concerns were supported by Chinese trade data, indicating falling imports on the alloying material used to make stainless steel.

Want a short- and medium-term buying outlook for aluminum, copper, tin, lead, zinc, nickel and several forms of steel? Subscribe to our monthly buying outlook reports!

Nickel traded on the London Metal Exchange ended Wednesday at $9,225 per metric ton, its lowest mark since June of last year.

John Meyer, SP Angel analyst, told the news source he anticipates nickel to be supported by concern over supplies of ore from the Philippines, which recently announced the ordered closure of more than half its mines in order to protect water sources.

“There is still a lot of stock for the market to burn,” Meyer told Reuters.

Nickel Trailing Other Industrial Metals

Our own Raul de Frutos wrote earlier this month of the downward pressure seen on nickel prices during Q1, which is in stark contrast to other industrial metals that have rallied during that same time.

Wrote de Frutos: “Nickel prices are struggling to make headway this year. Nickel’s supply narrative is rather complex and it’s exposed to significant changes depending on what policy makers in Indonesia and The Philippines do next. On the other hand, stainless buyers should continue to monitor their price risk exposure. Investors’ sentiment on industrial metals remains bullish and that could still trigger unexpected prices swings on the upside.”

How will nickel and base metals fare in 2017? You can find a more in-depth copper price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. For a short- and long-term buying strategy with specific price thresholds:

The MetalMiner analyst team alerted subscribers and trialers last week to significant movement on the zinc front. Prices for the non-ferrous metal have pulled back over the past several weeks, and are now trading near key support levels.

Wrote our own Raul de Frutos: “The price weakness seems to come from longs exiting their positions rather than shorts coming to the market. This suggests that sentiment hasn’t shifted to bearish for now. This could be a good opportunity to time purchases (3-5 months’ worth of demand) while prices trade near $2,500/mt.”

Want a short- and medium-term buying outlook for aluminum, copper, tin, lead, zinc, nickel and several forms of steel? Subscribe to our monthly buying outlook reports!

While many may panic and see this price decline as the end of zinc’s bull run, de Frutos sees this movement as an ideal opportunity to make purchases at an attractive price.

de Frutos added: “After doubling in price since the beginning of 2016, prices are now struggling in the $3,000 per metric ton level. However, the price weakness seems to come from long position buyers exiting those positions rather than shorts coming to the market. This suggests that sentiment hasn’t shifted to bearish for now. At the same time, we see strong support near $2,500/mt, which could provide a good opportunity to time purchases.”

How will zinc and base metals fare in 2017? You can find a more in-depth copper price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. For a short- and long-term buying strategy with specific price thresholds:

Lead ore. Source: Adobestock.

Lead prices, along with tin, lost some ground on the non-ferrous metals market on April 18, due in part to stockists selling as the result of subdued demand in the user industries.

According to a report from the Business Standard, lead fell slightly lower than tin with copper dropping by an even smaller margin.

Want a short- and medium-term buying outlook for aluminum, copper, tin, lead, zinc, nickel and several forms of steel? Subscribe to our monthly buying outlook reports!

Elsewhere in the realm of non-ferrous metals, lead’s sister metal zinc has seen its prices fall off sharply over the past several weeks.

Our own Raul de Frutos warns that now is the time to buy, although it’s important not to panic and view this as the end of zinc’s bull run. In fact, this is nothing more than a great opportunity to purchase the metal at an attractive price.

de Frutos wrote: “After doubling in price since the beginning of 2016, prices are now struggling in the $3,000 per metric ton level. However, the price weakness seems to come from long position buyers exiting those positions rather than shorts coming to the market. This suggests that sentiment hasn’t shifted to bearish for now. At the same time, we see strong support near $2,500/mt, which could provide a good opportunity to time purchases.”

Lead Price Outlook for 2017

How will lead and base metals fare in 2017? You can find a more in-depth copper price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. For a short- and long-term buying strategy with specific price thresholds:

Lithium Australia is making inroads to Germany for a joint venture with Deutsche Rohstoff, parent company of Tin International, in an attempt to uncover lithium in the region for production purposes.

Want a short- and medium-term buying outlook for aluminum, copper, tin, lead, zinc, nickel and several forms of steel? Subscribe to our monthly buying outlook reports!

According to a recent report from Business News, the key piece in the venture is Tin International’s Sadisdorf Tin deposit, a globally renowned Altenberg mine, which has been dormant since 1991 following 500 years of production. The mine is believed to contain a lithium-rich mica that is suited for Lithium Australia’s proprietary extraction means.

Adrian Griffin, managing director at Lithium Australia said, “The joint venture with Tin International provides Lithium Australia with a low-cost entry into an established JORC resource, albeit originally established for tin.”

“There is little doubt that a substantial Lithium inventory also exists and the focus of the joint venture is to fast-rack the project to feasibility,” he added. “The experience provided by Tin International will be a key element in expediting the evaluation process and we are pleased to have them as a partner.”

Your Tin Price Outlook for 2017

How will tin and base metals fare in 2017? You can find a more in-depth copper price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. For a short- and long-term buying strategy with specific price thresholds:

Set of copper pipes of different diameter lying in one heap

The copper industry is still reeling from its crisis of plummeting prices, but hope is on the horizon and a recovery is underway albeit a gradual one.

According to a recent report from Reuters, falling prices led to a reduction in output, but industry executives announced this week in a meeting in Chile, a top producer nation of the metal, that any recovery will be a slow one.

Want a short- and medium-term buying outlook for aluminum, copper, tin, lead, zinc, nickel and several forms of steel? Subscribe to our monthly buying outlook reports!

“The market seems to have left behind its worst moment, although it’s very premature to anticipate a new cycle of high prices,” Chilean Mining Minister Aurora Williams told the conference, according to Reuters.

Arnaud Soirat, copper and diamonds unit chief at Rio Tinto added that copper prices could receive support from external factors, including pending mine closures and ore grade decline.

“Copper’s long-term fundamentals are quite positive, and we expect to see further demand growth from emerging markets,” he told Reuters, forecasting a small deficit this year.

Copper Prices on Upward Trajectory?

Reuters also reported that copper consultancy CRU is projecting copper prices to trend upward over the next 3-4 years.

Said Vanessa Davidson, director of copper research: “We expect pressure on costs to continue…but we see copper prices rising faster than operating costs, ensuring that profit margins increase.”

How will copper and base metals fare in 2017? You can find a more in-depth copper price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. For a short- and long-term buying strategy with specific price thresholds:

If “imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, then perhaps being labeled a “disruptor” and compared to the likes of Amazon by an industry luminary isn’t such a bad thing either. Referring to the recent launch of MetalMiner (SM) Benchmark, Denny Oates, CEO and President of Universal Stainless named MetalMiner as a potential “threat” to the industry [stainless] at the recent Specialty Metals Conference hosted by MSCI in March.  

I guess it all depends on your perspective. When it comes to the inevitable arrival of price transparency in metals markets you can see the proverbial glass as half empty or as half full. We (and a growing number of other industry leaders) view it in a far more positive light. It’s simple really — when it comes to consumer demand for transparency, the choice is  pretty clear — get on the train or get run over by it. As former Chief of Staff of the U. S. Army, General Eric Shinseki, put it less delicately:  “If you don’t like change, you’ll like irrelevance even less.”

It’s natural to view any change to the status quo as potentially threatening but that most basic of human instincts — to fear something new — can often prevent you from seeing the opportunities that change brings. This, the first of a multi-part series on MetalMiner (SM) Benchmark, will attempt to shed light on this crowd-sourced application and show metal buying organizations as well as service centers and producers how this new capability can serve as an enabler creating trust between buyers and sellers, accentuating often overlooked value added capability, quality and on time delivery.  It also reduces uncertainty, speculation, and risk for all parties.

First, let’s set aside emotion and take a look at the facts — what has price transparency really meant in other industries? Let’s begin with the problem because most new solutions and innovations come from addressing an actual problem. In this case, the number one problem we hear from our audience always involves a version of “where can I get the price of (fill in the blank)?” And that “fill in the blank” typically covers aluminum, steel, stainless steel, copper, tinplate and GOES (grain-oriented electrical steel). In our world, if a customer wants something, figuring out how to give it to them is a good thing.

We’d argue that buying organizations constantly want to know:

  • the price of the specific metal they are buying (form/alloy/grade/thickness)
  • the forecast for that specific metal they are buying
  • the historical price for that specific metal they are buying
  • what other people are paying for that specific metal they are buying
  • what the drivers are for the specific metals that they are buying

In that same presentation by Denny Oates, he argues wisely (below) the different strategies industry players, both mills and service centers will have to take in order to succeed.

Benchmarking

The role of the “trusted advisor” appears prescient, except that we’d argue that being transparent with customers on what constitutes a “fair and reasonable market price” is something service centers need to embrace not fear. Trust between supplier and buyer is the currency of business in the new, high information, digital world in which we live. A case in point: An Accenture study of B2B sales suggests that 94% of B2B buyers say they conduct some form of online research before purchasing a business product. For large corporate purchases of more than $5,000, 34% spend over three hours researching products. Metals price benchmarking does not change buyer behavior, it simply makes it easier.  What’s interesting, though, is what happens when sellers embrace transparency and use it to endear customers to them.   Read more

Liquid metal

The Chinese aluminum industry has been able to cut costs by essentially selling liquid metal to nearby product manufacturers. Source: Adobe Stock/Kybele.

The head of aluminum for Rio Tinto Group is making a bold prediction: prices for the metal are heading for an “extremely” volatile crossroads.

According to a recent report from Bloomberg, Alfredo Barrios cites uncertainty with the timing of China curbing production, which will further serve to keep investors on the edge of their seats.

Want a short- and medium-term buying outlook for aluminum, copper, tin, lead, zinc, nickel and several forms of steel? Subscribe to our monthly buying outlook reports!

“That’s really where the uncertainty is at the moment,” Barrios told Bloomberg in an interview at their Toronto office. “There’s no doubt that if you look at the supply side, if you look at the environmental issues, sooner or later that will change. But when is a question mark.”

China continues its fight against pollution by ordering to reduce steel and aluminum output in more than two dozen northern cities.

Aluminum Price Impacted by Overcapacity, High Inventory

Barrios added that overcapacity and high inventory could impact aluminum price increases in the near future.

“There’s a number of factors which will dampen any price increase if it goes too far,” he told the news source. “If you look at what are the fundamental reasons behind why prices are where they are, and how different they are from a year ago, it’s sometimes very difficult to see what has made aluminum be higher at all. What’s changed so radically in the last year?”

How will aluminum and base metals fare in 2017? You can find a more in-depth copper price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. For a short- and long-term buying strategy with specific price thresholds:

Liquid steel.

Innovation in steelmaking is coming from novel uses of liquid metal. Source: Adobe Stock/Photollug.

One South Korean steelmaker is seeing significant business returns as a result of rising steel prices.

According to a recent report from Reuters, POSCO, the steelmaker in question, said its estimated Q1 operating profit likely grew 82%, far exceeding analyst expectations. The reason? Rising steel prices outpacing raw material cost growth.

Want a short- and medium-term buying outlook for aluminum, copper, tin, lead, zinc, nickel and several forms of steel? Subscribe to our monthly buying outlook reports!

It is also worth noting that POSCO’s (formerly the Pohang Iron & Steel Company) estimated revenue grew 17% in Q1 with final Q1 numbers expected to be reported sometime in April.

Steel Industry Rallying Behind President Trump

Our own Jeff Yoders reported this week the American Iron and Steel Institute stands firmly in the corner of the Trump administration in supporting its executive actions against regulation. The AISI released a statement supporting the executive action lifting the Environmental Protection Agency‘s Clean Power Plan.

“The domestic steel industry has made substantial gains in reducing our energy usage as well as our environmental footprint, and we remain committed to our sustainable performance,” said Thomas J. Gibson, president and CEO of AISI. “However, these burdensome regulations could harm the international competitiveness of energy-intensive, trade-exposed U.S. industries like steel.’

How will steel and base metals fare in 2017? You can find a more in-depth copper price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. For a short- and long-term buying strategy with specific price thresholds:

A lighted underground tunnel in a nickel mine.

Nickel prices remained steady last week due to a lack of new fundamentals that would drive the commodity either up or down.

According to a recent report from the Economic Calendar, nickel traded on the London Metal Exchange at $10,210 to $10,115 a metric ton with support at $9,860/mt and resistance at $10,735/mt.

Want a short- and medium-term buying outlook for aluminum, copper, tin, lead, zinc, nickel and several forms of steel? Subscribe to our monthly buying outlook reports!

Leia Toovey, writing for the Economic Calendar, said “Nickel futures experienced upside earlier in the month when Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte threatened to stop all mining in the world’s biggest exporter of nickel. This comes after the Philippines suspended mining activities at numerous nickel mines found to be in violation of environmental regulations.”

Nickel Prices Break Even in Q1

Our own Raul de Frutos recently wrote extensively on the current state of the nickel market, and found that while most industrial metals will finish Q1 2017 on the upside, nickel is one exception.

de Frutos wrote: “The metal has traded up and down to finish the first quarter close to flat. Nickel prices are significantly higher than they were one year ago and traders are now finding little reason to be any more bullish than bearish due to a mix of news that helps both positions.”

He concluded that nickel is in dire need of new fundamental price drivers, positive or negative.

“With all of this uncertainty, industrial buyers might want to wait for new clues before making purchasing decisions,” he wrote.

How will nickel and base metals fare in 2017? You can find a more in-depth copper price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. For a short- and long-term buying strategy with specific price thresholds:

The head of an Indian zinc company is using the surge in metal prices to the financial benefit of his shareholders in a major way.

According to a recent piece from Bloomberg, Anil Agarwal, the billionaire head of Hindustan Zinc Ltd., is parlaying metal price increases into a $4 billion dividend for shareholders in what is being called a record return for the company.

Want a short- and medium-term buying outlook for aluminum, copper, tin, lead, zinc, nickel and several forms of steel? Subscribe to our monthly buying outlook reports!

The closest beneficiaries include Vedanta Ltd. (65% ownership) and the Indian government (30% ownership), Bloomberg stated. Hindustan Zinc is the largest zinc producer in India.

“Vedanta continues to be in a very good space given all its verticals are doing well and if they can reduce debt that would be a better ploy and would increase the returns for shareholders,” Sanjiv Bhasin, executive vice president at India Infoline Ltd., told the news source by phone. “Metals, as a proxy to global growth and given the stimulus announced in the U.S., have been the best asset class in the past one year, and it will continue to outperform.”

Zinc Price Rally Amps Up

Our own Raul de Frutos wrote earlier this week that zinc prices climbed the week prior and the metal is now trading near the milestone of $3,000 per metric ton, which is the last time prices have been at this point since September 2007.

de Frutos wrote: “Zinc has doubled in price since it hit bottom in January of last year. As prices climbed, many buyers probably made the mistake of thinking prices were too high, missing this spectacular rally. However, buyers that subscribe to our monthly outlook, didn’t miss this rally. We recommended buying forward starting in April of 2016. Ever since, prices have risen without looking back.”

How will zinc and base metals fare in 2017? You can find a more in-depth copper price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. For a short- and long-term buying strategy with specific price thresholds: