Commentary

Tired of being an also ran?

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Having status symbols no better than the guy next door? Ever pulled up in your yacht only to find, 10 minutes later, a guy with a yacht twice the size pulls into the same bay right next to you? Yeah, tiresome isn’t it?

Who Needs a Ferrari When You Can Have a Gold iPhone 7?

Well, while everyone else is queueing outside an Apple store from midnight before the next morning release of a new smartphone, we have something so much better for you. This is the new iPhone 7 from Goldgenie, finished in 24-karat Gold, Rose Gold or Platinum, and if that is not enough for you they do a super luxury version edged and decorated with Swarovski Crystals and even high-quality diamonds. Here’s the best bit, this exclusive, oh-so-cool, piece of one-upsmanship (if there is such a word) luxurious collection will be available with prices starting at just $3,150 (£2,400).

goldgenie_gold_iphone7_550

Why buy a bigger yacht when you can have a 24-karat gold iPhone 7? Source: goldgenie.

However if you really want to push that boat out and outdo the sheikh next to you, go for the $14,300 (£11,000 ) Diamond Rockstar. A bargain, right? It is also rumored that the luxury brand may even be replicating the $3 million (£2.3m) iPhone 6s Diamond Ecstasy encrusted with over 800 diamonds. Read more

This week, most exchange-traded metal prices came down to Earth as the Federal Reserve hinted it may finally increase interest rates. The hardest hit was copper, which hit a two-month London Metal Exchange low. Weaker Chinese imports over the past few months and the bearish calls of some major banks have exacerbated copper’s recent price fall.

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When construction is strong in, China copper imports surge… but with them falling? It doesn’t look like demand in the world’s largest consumer is keeping up. Copper is just one of many metals that would be affected by interest rate increases and more hawkish behavior from the Fed, in general, but unlike other non-ferrous metals whose prices have increased on the LME this year — such as zinc and tin — copper has not shown strong demand and generally falling supply. Copper never was fundamentally strong even when its price jumped in Q2.

Trump Trumpets Trade

Politics met metals this week as Republican Presidential Nominee Donald Trump became the first candidate for President to promise to label China a currency manipulator and take action at the World Trade Organization accordingly.  He also promised to instruct the office of the U.S. Trade Representative to bring more trade cases against China. You’d think he’d be nicer to the country that used to make his ties.

Let’s Exchange, No Spoofs!

The London Metal Exchange and CME Group made headlines this week as the former cut fees in half this month as an apology for moving its live “ring” (where traders make deals using hand gestures on big red couches) trading to a backup location after structural problems were discovered at its brand new London office. As for CME Group, it cracked down on a rogue trader, suspending him for at least 60 days, for “spoofing.” Spoofing is the practice of setting up electronic trades to create demand only to pull out of them at the last minute.

India Hates Steel Dumping, Too

India joined the U.S. and E.U. this week in placing tariffs on cheap imports of hot-rolled and cold-rolled flat steel. Although six countries saw their imports to the world’s largest democracy tariffed, China was, again, the main dumping culprit.

Aluminum Association: Let’s Make a Deal

Speaking of China, not only does the Aluminum Association — North America’s largest trade association of primary smelters — still want a bilateral trade deal with China to set up rules for imports from the People’s Republic, but it signaled this week that it would pursue tariffs similar to those steel has won against Chinese importers if it can’t get the deal it wants for its producer members.

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The AA may even ask the International Trade Commission to reclassify some imports of “semi-finished” product to make them subject to existing taxes.

Nickel symbol handheld in front of the periodic tableNickel futures traded down Tuesday this week due in part to a burgeoning overseas trend and subdued demand.

The London Metal Exchange was the source of this weakening trend with sluggish demand attributed to alloy makers in the domestic spot market, according to a report from The Economic Times.

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Nickel wasn’t alone in its LME downward trend as most industrial metals retreated on the heels of commentary from the Federal Reserve, which fueled speculation that U.S. borrowing costs will rise in the coming year. Read more

The month of August has seen the Indian government slap anti-dumping duties on the import of a variety of steel products from six countries including China, South Korea, Brazil and Indonesia.

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In the first week, the import duty was imposed on hot-rolled steel products, while a few days ago, the duty was enforced on certain cold-rolled flat steel products from different countries to protect the domestic industry from cheap imports.

In the first case, anti-dumping duties $474-557 per metric ton were imposed on hot-rolled flat products of alloy or non-alloy steel from China, Japan, South Korea, Russia, Brazil and Indonesia, according to a government notification.

Coiledsteel_585

Imports of coiled steel will be heavily tariffed in India, too. Source: iStock.

The duty will be in force for six months until February 7.

Hot-Rolled Duties

An anti-dumping duty of $474 per ton was imposed on import of hot-rolled flat products of alloy or non-alloy steel of a width up to 2,100 millimeter with a width up to 25 mm from Korea and Japan.

According to an Indian Express report Korean firms affected by this were Hyundai Steel Co. and POSCO. Three Japanese companies — JFE Steel Corp., Nippon Steel and Sumitomo Metal Corp. are also on the list. A similar anti-dumping duty was slapped on imports of similar products from China. Exporters Angang Steel Company Ltd. and Zhangjiagang were among the hardest hit. Imports of the same from Indonesia, Russia and Brazil attracted the $474 per mt duty. Read more

Iron ore prices have done an amazing job of defying gravity, the price has risen 41.7% this year after three straight years of losses according to Australia’s Business Insider.

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Prices for 62% fines hit $61.75 per dry ton this week and have averaged $53.64 per dry metric ton this year.

Source: Business Insider

Source: Business Insider

The raw material has variously been called the darling of the commodities market and by Citicorp as 2016’s hot commodity but many are now beginning to ask if enough is enough and just how much support there is for current price levels let alone further rises. Read more

In a speech in Tampa, Fla., Wednesday afternoon, Republican Presidential Nominee Donald Trump outlined a seven-point plan to bring millions of jobs to the U.S. that involved labeling China a currency manipulator.

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He proposed renegotiating unconfirmed trade agreements such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership and told his audience he would pull the U.S. out of the North American Free Trade Agreement. In a first, Trump challenged China for “illegal activities” and vowed to label the country he did real estate business with a currency manipulator.

“I am going to instruct my Treasury Secretary to label China a currency manipulator,” he said. “Any country that devalues their currency in order to take unfair advantage of the United States — and all of its companies who can’t (then) compete —will face tariffs and to stop the cheating.”

Getting Tough With China

Trump also vowed to instruct the office of the U.S. Trade Representative to bring trade cases against China, both in this country and at the World Trade Organization. Read more

Apparently, when the government is a shareholder in your business. Questions are being raised as to why the French government has gone soft on Renault‘s emissions probe, omitting crucial details a Financial Times article states.

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The government report, published last month, concluded that some Renault models emitted nitrogen oxide at nine to 11 times higher than European Union limits, the article states. But three of the 17 members of the commission said that the published report did not include the full details of their findings, including the fact that a NOx “trap” in the Renault Captur went into overdrive when the sport-utility vehicle was prepared for emissions testing but not during normal driving conditions.

It was similar software that induced changes in behavior that tipped off U.S. authorities investigating Volkswagen “defeat devices” last year.

Apparently, Renault was not the only manufacturer to fare badly in the probe, which covered some 86 vehicles from a dozen automakers; yet the report did not find any cases of intentional attempts to cheat emissions, admitting that the government tries to give a positive brand image to firms it was invested in and hoped to push manufacturers in the right direction rather than seek prosecution.

One wonders what their attitude would be if it were Toyota or General Motors found to be posting erroneous data? The same article said the Fiat 500x registered NOx emissions almost 17 times European Union limits.

In Renault’s case, the Captur’s NOx trap purged five times in rapid succession at the end of scripted test preparations, allowing the car to produce much lower emissions than on the road the article explained, suggesting the car’s software could have detected that a test was being performed.

“Everything in a car is controlled by software now,” one commission member said, many of whom asked to remain anonymous. “We can’t be sure that Renault’s software detected the test like Volkswagen’s, but it seems that Renault has optimized the NOx filter to target this very specific set of conditions.”

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It would seem it may well have benefited Renault to have both the judge and jury in the dock with you, but does it benefit the wider community the government was elected to represent? This story, no doubt, has further to run.

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative recently sent to Congress a draft Statement of Administration Action for the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a procedural step necessary before a draft implementing bill is sent to Congress.

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According to the fast-track law, the trade rep must send a draft SAA to Congress at least 30 days before it submits a draft implementing bill, but that does not mean it will be submitted in that timeframe, that’s just merely the minimum before a bill can be sent. The trade rep sent notification August 12th. Read more

Another Chinese steelmaker, Bohai Steel Group, has been given a bailout and Japan’s Tokyo Steel Manufacturing has left prices unchanged for three months.

Bohai Bailout

Bohai Steel Group, the indebted state-owned conglomerate, may receive help from a local government bailout fund to restructure its debts, the online financial magazine Caixin said over the weekend.

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Bohai Steel, which was created in 2010 through the combination of four manufacturers, holds liabilities of $28.9 billion (192 billion CNY) from 105 creditors, alongside assets of nearly CNY 290 billion, Caixin reported.

The Tianjin government plans to create a local asset manager to assist in the debt workout of Bohai Steel, alongside other troubled Tianjin enterprises, the magazine said.

Restructuring of the group represented the biggest since the global financial crisis, Standard & Poor’s analyst Christopher Lee told Reuters in March.

Tokyo Steel Leaves Prices Unchanged

Tokyo Steel Manufacturing, Japan’s top electric arc furnace steelmaker, said on Monday it would keep product prices unchanged for the third month in September, reflecting a slow recovery in its local market.

Free Download: The August 2016 MMI Report

Tokyo Steel’s pricing strategy is closely watched by Asian rivals such as POSCO, Hyundai Steel Co. and Baosteel, which all export to Japan.

a handful of granular zinc on a white backgroundPreliminary data from the International Lead and Zing Study Group reveals the global market for refined zinc metal was in deficit from January to May this year with reported total inventories also declining over that same time frame.

Decreases in output from India, Australia, Peru, Ireland and the U.S. led to the significant 7.7% reduction in global zinc mine production in the first half of 2016, compared to the same time period in 2015.

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“World output of refined zinc metal declined by 3.6% with reductions in India, Japan and the U.S. being partially balanced by increases in the Republic of Korea and Namibia,” the ILZSG report stated.

The report also stated that world demand for refined zinc metal grew 0.6% due to the rise in Chinese apparent usage, to the tune of 8.2%, that offset declines in Japan, Taiwan, the Republic of Korea and the U.S.

Lastly, Chinese imports of zinc contained in zinc concentrates fell substantially, by 26% with the country’s net imports of refined zinc metal growing by 112%.

Metal Prices Bullish on Global Stock Markets

Investors are becoming more positive on the health of the global economy, which could translate to industrial metals demand growth. The reason? Global stock markets continue to rise, and have already made up for their losses following Brexit.

You can find a more in-depth zinc price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. Check it out to receive short- and long-term buying strategies with specific price thresholds.