aluminum price

I know it sounds a bit geeky, but we at MetalMiner love to hear about new applications for aluminum. This latest development is not exactly going to change the global demand-supply balance for aluminum but it does showcase one of the many qualities the metal possesses, one which is sometimes overshadowed by aluminum’s lightweight or easy formability.

Benchmark Your Current Aluminum Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

Aluminum’s use in batteries is nothing new. Aluminum–air batteries have been a topic of research for some time and work by producing electricity from the reaction of oxygen in the air with aluminum. They have one of the highest energy densities of all batteries, but they are not widely used because of problems with high anode cost and by-product removal when using traditional electrolytes. Read more

With aluminum premiums on the rise in the U.S. and Europe, and Japanese inventories falling amid growing demand, producers are upping the ante by charging the Pacific Rim a higher premium for the second quarter in a row.

According to a recent report from Reuters, three global aluminum producers offered buyers in Japan a premium of $135 per metric ton for shipments of the metal in Q2. This would mark an increase of 42% quarter-over-quarter.

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“The producers claimed that the rise mainly reflected higher premiums in the U.S. market, but we think $135 is too high as we don’t feel much supply tightness here,” a source at an end-user told the news source, adding that his company would aim for premiums at around $120-125/mt.

Aluminum Leads the Charge in February

Our own Raul de Frutos wrote this week that of all the industrial metals, aluminum performed the best in February with prices on the London Metal Exchange growing above $1,9000 per metric ton. This marks the first time since May 2015 prices have been this high for the metal.

Wrote de Frutos: “In February, China finally approved its Air Pollution Control regulations, which came into effect on the March 1.The world’s largest nation-producer of the metal will force about a third of aluminum capacity in the provinces of Shandong, Henan, Hebei and Shanxi to be shut down over the winter season, which runs from the middle of November through the middle of March.”

How will aluminum and base metals fare in 2017? You can find a more in-depth copper price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. For a short- and long-term buying strategy with specific price thresholds:

 

Aluminum led industrial metals in February. Prices on the London Metal Exchange rose above $1,900 per metric ton for the first time since May 2015.

Benchmark Your Current Aluminum Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

In February, China finally approved its Air Pollution Control regulations, which came into effect on the March 1.The world’s largest nation-producer of the metal will force about a third of aluminum capacity in the provinces of Shandong, Henan, Hebei and Shanxi to be shut down over the winter season, which runs from the middle of November through the middle of March.

Aluminum MMI

The idea was first proposed in January and initially there was skepticism. Markets know that in the aluminum industry it takes time to ramp down and ramp back up production with smelters taking significant losses. This time, China is committed to enforcing the new law and it will prevent local authorities from protecting local smelters.

Capacity Crunch

Some 40% of China’s total capacity is potentially affected and analysts estimate that a 1.3 million mt of output will be lost. However, this figure could be larger since the new law will also impact the supply of raw materials such as alumina and carbon anode plants. Other industry analysts see a loss of 3 mmt of aluminum capacity.

The previous years of supply surplus might provide some cushion against the sort of disruption planned by Beijing. However, this potential supply shock is unprecedented in the aluminum industry and could translate into a complete game changer in terms of aluminum’s fundamentals.

Chinese citizens have previously protested about pollution issues, but tensions are getting much worse. In February, more than 200 people chanted and held banners outside the Daqing city government headquarters to protest against a new aluminum plant. Although the plant would produce more than 30,000 jobs to locals, they now prioritize pollution reduction over employment. As we’ve warned in previous reports, it’s hard to put a limit to aluminum’s price potential as smog moves to the top of Beijing’s policy agenda.

Midwest Premiums Hit $0.1/Pound

Midwest premiums rise to $0.1/pound. Source: MetalMiner IndX.

Midwest premiums continued to climb in February, hitting an almost three-year high. As we warned last month, in addition to higher aluminum prices due to supply cuts, we could see higher aluminum premiums this year due to ongoing trade tensions, just as we saw the spread between domestic and international steel prices widen.

The U.S. experienced a sharp contraction in aluminum smelting capacity over the past year. This has created a case of supply shortfall within the U.S., which now depends on aluminum imports to satisfy its rising domestic demand.

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This year, the U.S. launched a formal complaint against the Chinese government with the World Trade Organization over subsidies it says Beijing provides to the country’s vast aluminum industry. The fight against imports is getting more serious and this is something that could support domestic aluminum premiums this year.

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U.S. construction spending unexpectedly fell in January as the biggest drop in public outlays since 2002 offset gains in investment in private projects, pointing to moderate economic growth in the first quarter.

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The Commerce Department said on Wednesday that construction spending declined 1% to $1.18 trillion. Construction spending in December was revised to show a 0.1% increase rather than the previously reported 0.2% decline.

Economists polled by Reuters had forecast construction spending gaining 0.6% in January rather than the loss that was booked.

Construction MMI

Our Construction MMI held steady this month despite the falling spending. The component metals of the sub-index still have bulls behind them, despite the flat performance. Steel construction materials such as rebar and h-beams are still posting big gains but scrap and others saw a loss.

It’s almost as if construction products are still in demand, particularly in China’s construction sector, even as U.S. construction experiences a pullback.

In January, public construction spending in the U.S. tumbled 5%, the largest drop since March 2002. That followed a 1.4% decline in December. Public construction spending has now decreased for three straight months.

Outlays on state and local government construction projects dropped 4.8%, also the biggest drop since March 2002. This could be an ominous sign for construction spending this year, provided, of course, that a major infrastructure plan, such as the $1 trillion plan President Trump continues to promise, doesn’t pass quickly enough to boost construction prices. The longer that it takes to pass an infrastructure plan, the less likely it is to boost contractors’ bottom lines this year.

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That boost is needed for our aging infrastructure, too. Spending on state and local government construction projects has now dropped for three straight months. Federal government construction spending plummeted 7.4% in January, the largest decline since May 2014. The drop snapped three consecutive months of gains.

Spending on private construction projects actually rose 0.2% in January, but could not make up for the loses in government projects.

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A recent article from news service Reuters raises concerns over the continued strength of the aluminum price.

Benchmark Your Aluminum Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

Global aluminum prices have risen over the last six months, led by a strong rebound in the Chinese market. From a low of just over 9,000 yuan (electric town) in November 2015, the Shanghai price as risen steadily to above 14,000 yuan today as this graph from Thompson Reuters illustrates.

Source: Reuters

Spurred by healthy demand and the rising price, smelters have responded with gusto. As primary metal production in the rest of the world has fallen by an annualized 182,500 metric tons per year, output in China has surged. Although monthly figures are subject to considerable swings, Reuters reports January hitting a record of 2.95 million mt according to figures from China’s non-ferrous metals industry association. That is equivalent to an annualized rate of 34.7 mmt or 56% of global output, a staggering 19% year-on-year growth. Read more

The 3-Month LME aluminum price soars. Source: Fastmarkets.com.

Aluminum prices hit $1,900 per metric ton this week. Aluminum has surged 13% so far this year.

China Proposes Supply Cuts to Fight Pollution

We already predicted at the beginning of January that China’s supply would be the most important price driver to watch this year.

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In February, a Chinese government document proposed that about a third of aluminum capacity in the provinces of Shandong, Henan, Hebei and Shanxi be shut down over the winter months. If implemented, they would be some of the most radical steps so far to tackle air quality in the country of 1 billion’s most polluted cities. Read more

We warned last month that the mostly small losses the prices our MetalMiner IndX experienced were caused by investors taking profits.

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Our suspicions were confirmed when almost all of our sub-indexes had big price rebounds this month. The Automotive MMI jumped 12.2% Raw Steels 8% and Aluminum 6%. Even our Stainless Steel MMI only dropped 1.7% and has taken off since February 1 as nickel supply is even more in question now with both the Philippines and Indonesia’s raw ore exports in question.

The bull market is on for the entire industrial metals complex. Last month’s pause was necessary for markets to digest gains but the strong positive sentiment for both manufacturing and construction shows no signs of ebbing in the U.S. and Chinese markets.

One of the biggest social challenges facing the authorities in Beijing is that of environmental pollution. It’s not just the western media that is fixated by measures of particulate matter and images of impenetrable smog in Beijing, the general population has been moved to outright demonstration and the impact on the health of those living in the affected areas is an extremely serious issue causing widespread discontent. Beijing knows it must come to grips with this problem. Drastic action is required, and recent reports suggest the authorities are finally considering just that.

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According to CRU Group, the Chinese Ministry of environmental protection is consulting industry groups such as the China Nonferrous Industry Association about a proposal to shut down 30% of the aluminum smelting capacity and 50% of alumina refining capacity during the big winter heating period from November to March in an effort to reduce coal-fired power consumption. Rumous of this proposal contributed to recent rises in aluminum prices even though the impact would not be felt before the end of 2017 and there is still considerable debate on how viable such a policy would-be.

Shutdown Plan

The provinces in question are Shandong, Shanxi, Hebei and Henan, home to a significant portion of China’s aluminum smelting and alumina refining capacity. According to an article by Aluminum Insider, Shandong produces 11 million metric tons of aluminum per year, Henan turns out 3.8 mmt, Shanxi is good for 1 mmt, while Hebei puts out 100,000 mt a year. Those four provinces account for 37% of the country’s total output of aluminum. Shandong refines 23.5 mmt of alumina per year, Henan produces 12.6 mmt, and Shanxi produces 20 mmt each year, combining to produce around 78% of the country’s total alumina output. Read more

China is a top producer of aluminum, and its ongoing battle against pollution could lead to production cuts and, subsequently, skyrocketing aluminum prices.

According to a recent report from Reuters, the aluminum price rally could also potentially be offset by the oversupply situation. Any kind of extreme market fluctuation would be dependent on the Chinese government following through on the shutdown of aluminum-rich provinces during the winter months.

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“When the government in the past tried to implement measures to control production it wasn’t very successful,” Edgardo Gelsomino, research director at consultancy Wood Mackenzie, said. “The only time production cuts really happened in China was when the economics of the smelters didn’t work.”

Aluminum Prices Begin Year on a Strong Note

Our own Raul de Frutos wrote recently on exactly how much US aluminum prices and premiums can rise in 2017. Well, they started off the year strong. “While robust demand has supported aluminum prices, investors’ eyes have recently turned to the supply side of the equation. In December, China’s share of global aluminum output was more than 56%. The giant producer’s share of supply is now facing some serious risks,” de Frutos wrote.

He concluded: “In addition to higher aluminum prices due to supply cuts, we could see higher aluminum premiums due to the ongoing trade tensions, just as we saw the spread between domestic and international steel prices widen.”

How will aluminum and base metals fare in 2017? You can find a more in-depth copper price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. For a short- and long-term buying strategy with specific price thresholds:

In January, aluminum prices broke through the $1,800 per metric ton level. That was an important development signaling that bulls are taking over. Just a month ago we pointed out that prices had upside potential.

We believe the key this year will be on the supply side and not as much on the demand side. These are some factors that could limit growth in aluminum output this year:

Pollution in China

A recent Chinese government document proposed that about a third of aluminum capacity in the provinces of Shandong, Henan, Hebei and Shanxi should be shut over the winter months. That sparked excitement among aluminum investors. These provinces account for over 20% of global aluminum output.

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In addition, late last month the country passed a law that will allow it to impose environmental protection taxes from January 2018, following an outbreak of hazardous smog in northern China where many industrial producers are located.

The takeaway is that China is taking air pollution seriously. Given that coal burning is the biggest contributor to air pollution in China, industrial metals supply could shrink this year, particularly steel and aluminum. Environmental closures are looking increasingly likely in China this year. What’s still up in the air is how much energy-efficient capacity will replace shutdowns in dirty capacity.

Trade Barriers

The fight against imports is getting more serious and this is something that could support not only aluminum prices but also midwest premiums, which rose to $0.09/pound in January. Recently, the U.S. launched a formal complaint against the Chinese government with the World Trade Organization over subsidies it says Beijing provides to the country’s vast aluminum industry.

In addition, U.S. customs officials seized $25 million worth of aluminum linked to a Chinese billionaire accused of stockpiling the metal across the world. The move is the most potent action yet by federal authorities probing whether U.S. companies connected to Chinese magnate Liu Zhongtian illegally avoided nearly 400% tariffs by routing the metal through other countries.

The same combination of domestic environmental and foreign trade imperatives already forced China to get serious about steel capacity closures. Is it possible that we see a similar outcome in aluminum? Quite likely.

Rising Raw Material Costs

Many analysts argue that cutbacks in China won’t happen because aluminum prices are well above last year’s levels, when prices were trading at $1,450/mt. However, it’s important to note that production costs are well above last year’s levels, too. The increase in production costs will limit additional restarts this year.

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Chinese coal production dropped 10% last year. Thermal coal prices doubled and hard coking coal prices quadrupled. China also proposed to close 50% of alumina refining capacity in Shandong, Shanxi, Hebei and Henan from November to March. Alumina prices already rose by more than 50% in 2016. Further shutdowns are likely to support prices of the raw material this year.

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