aluminum price

Aluminum prices have risen around 15% since the beginning of the year.

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The metal is currently trading at a two-year high, just below $1,950 per metric ton. A slow but steady rise.

The aluminum 3003-H14 Sheet price. Source: MetalMiner Price Benchmark.

This year’s rally comes as markets tries to price in Chinese anti-pollution capacity cuts next winter. The world’s largest nation-producer of the metal will force “about a third of aluminum capacity in the provinces of Shandong, Henan, Hebei and Shanxi to be shut down over the winter,” reported Reuters, which runs from the middle of November through the middle of March, putting at risk about 1.3 million mt of production. Read more

Speaking at S&P Global Platts’ recent Steel Markets North America conference, noted trade attorney Alan Price of the Washington law firm Wiley Rein said the World Trade Organization case that the federal government filed on behalf of aluminum producers against Chinese overproduction of the light metal in January, will essentially serve as a guide for other industries looking to challenge state-subsidized companies’ overproduction for export in the People’s Republic.

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“The solutions to Chinese overcapacity are to follow the money and see who’s subsidizing it,” said Price, who has represented several U.S. industries in anti-dumping and countervailing duty legal actions against Chinese producers, as well as WTO disputes. “China has not fundamentally reformed its excess capacity. The rest of the world’s production has remained stable, but the explosion in Chinese capacity is still there.”

Alan Price

Alan Price, image courtesy of Wiley Rein

Price said the aluminum case fundamentally attacks the mechanism China uses to back up failing businesses, the availability of subsidized money in China known as “money for metal” on the municipal, state and federal level there.

“The WTO case involving aluminum, challenges, fundamentally, the Chinese subsidization system,” Price said. “It goes after the financial systems of China and how everything is financed. In aluminum you can track all the companies involved. There are around 10 and it’s a much more understandable beast, much more understandable problem than the vastness of the Chinese steel industry. This case will fundamentally decide if China will be allowed to prop up failing businesses.” Read more

If you can’t beat them, then join them? That may be the gist of UC Rusal’s latest proposal for dealing with Chinese aluminum overproduction: an OPEC-like organization for the global aluminum industry.

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In a Reuters article the world’s largest aluminiu producer outside of China was quoted by the TASS news agency at an economic conference in Russia’s Black Sea resort of Sochi as suggesting that Industry ministers should get together and explore ways and means of creating a producers club.

Liquid metal

The Chinese aluminum industry has been able to cut costs by essentially selling liquid metal to nearby product manufacturers. Source: Adobe Stock/Kybele.

The trade minister quoted by TASS, Denis Manturov, talked of creating a single policy in the area of standards and technology but, in reality, there would be little to be gained if that was the sole purpose. More attractive to western smelters in general, and Rusal in particular, would be any mechanism that curbed China’s growing dominance of the primary aluminum market.

Rusal was, until a few years ago the world’s largest aluminum producer. In 2016 Rusal produced 3.685 million metric tons, according to Reuters, but China now produces over half the world’s aluminum with Chinese producers overtaking the Russian firm. China’s Hongqiao is now the world’s biggest aluminum producer overtaking Rusal in 2015 and again in 2016. Read more

I know it sounds a bit geeky, but we at MetalMiner love to hear about new applications for aluminum. This latest development is not exactly going to change the global demand-supply balance for aluminum but it does showcase one of the many qualities the metal possesses, one which is sometimes overshadowed by aluminum’s lightweight or easy formability.

Benchmark Your Current Aluminum Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

Aluminum’s use in batteries is nothing new. Aluminum–air batteries have been a topic of research for some time and work by producing electricity from the reaction of oxygen in the air with aluminum. They have one of the highest energy densities of all batteries, but they are not widely used because of problems with high anode cost and by-product removal when using traditional electrolytes. Read more

With aluminum premiums on the rise in the U.S. and Europe, and Japanese inventories falling amid growing demand, producers are upping the ante by charging the Pacific Rim a higher premium for the second quarter in a row.

According to a recent report from Reuters, three global aluminum producers offered buyers in Japan a premium of $135 per metric ton for shipments of the metal in Q2. This would mark an increase of 42% quarter-over-quarter.

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“The producers claimed that the rise mainly reflected higher premiums in the U.S. market, but we think $135 is too high as we don’t feel much supply tightness here,” a source at an end-user told the news source, adding that his company would aim for premiums at around $120-125/mt.

Aluminum Leads the Charge in February

Our own Raul de Frutos wrote this week that of all the industrial metals, aluminum performed the best in February with prices on the London Metal Exchange growing above $1,9000 per metric ton. This marks the first time since May 2015 prices have been this high for the metal.

Wrote de Frutos: “In February, China finally approved its Air Pollution Control regulations, which came into effect on the March 1.The world’s largest nation-producer of the metal will force about a third of aluminum capacity in the provinces of Shandong, Henan, Hebei and Shanxi to be shut down over the winter season, which runs from the middle of November through the middle of March.”

How will aluminum and base metals fare in 2017? You can find a more in-depth copper price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. For a short- and long-term buying strategy with specific price thresholds:

 

Aluminum led industrial metals in February. Prices on the London Metal Exchange rose above $1,900 per metric ton for the first time since May 2015.

Benchmark Your Current Aluminum Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

In February, China finally approved its Air Pollution Control regulations, which came into effect on the March 1.The world’s largest nation-producer of the metal will force about “a third of aluminum capacity in the provinces of Shandong, Henan, Hebei and Shanxi to be shut down over the winter,” according to Reuters, which runs from the middle of November through the middle of March.

Aluminum MMI

The idea was first proposed in January and initially there was skepticism. Markets know that in the aluminum industry it takes time to ramp down and ramp back up production with smelters taking significant losses. This time, China is committed to enforcing the new law and it will prevent local authorities from protecting local smelters.

Capacity Crunch

Some 40% of China’s total capacity is potentially affected and analysts estimate that a 1.3 million mt of output will be lost. However, this figure could be larger since the new law will also impact the supply of raw materials such as alumina and carbon anode plants. Other industry analysts see a loss of 3 mmt of aluminum capacity.

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U.S. construction spending unexpectedly fell in January as the biggest drop in public outlays since 2002 offset gains in investment in private projects, pointing to moderate economic growth in the first quarter.

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The Commerce Department said on Wednesday that construction spending declined 1% to $1.18 trillion. Construction spending in December was revised to show a 0.1% increase rather than the previously reported 0.2% decline.

Economists polled by Reuters had forecast construction spending gaining 0.6% in January rather than the loss that was booked.

Construction MMI

Our Construction MMI held steady this month despite the falling spending. The component metals of the sub-index still have bulls behind them, despite the flat performance. Steel construction materials such as rebar and h-beams are still posting big gains but scrap and others saw a loss.

It’s almost as if construction products are still in demand, particularly in China’s construction sector, even as U.S. construction experiences a pullback.

In January, public construction spending in the U.S. tumbled 5%, the largest drop since March 2002. That followed a 1.4% decline in December. Public construction spending has now decreased for three straight months.

Outlays on state and local government construction projects dropped 4.8%, also the biggest drop since March 2002. This could be an ominous sign for construction spending this year, provided, of course, that a major infrastructure plan, such as the $1 trillion plan President Trump continues to promise, doesn’t pass quickly enough to boost construction prices. The longer that it takes to pass an infrastructure plan, the less likely it is to boost contractors’ bottom lines this year.

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That boost is needed for our aging infrastructure, too. Spending on state and local government construction projects has now dropped for three straight months. Federal government construction spending plummeted 7.4% in January, the largest decline since May 2014. The drop snapped three consecutive months of gains.

Spending on private construction projects actually rose 0.2% in January, but could not make up for the loses in government projects.

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A recent article from news service Reuters raises concerns over the continued strength of the aluminum price.

Benchmark Your Aluminum Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

Global aluminum prices have risen over the last six months, led by a strong rebound in the Chinese market. From a low of just over 9,000 yuan (electric town) in November 2015, the Shanghai price as risen steadily to above 14,000 yuan today as this graph from Thompson Reuters illustrates.

Source: Reuters

Spurred by healthy demand and the rising price, smelters have responded with gusto. As primary metal production in the rest of the world has fallen by an annualized 182,500 metric tons per year, output in China has surged. Although monthly figures are subject to considerable swings, Reuters reports January hitting a record of 2.95 million mt according to figures from China’s non-ferrous metals industry association. That is equivalent to an annualized rate of 34.7 mmt or 56% of global output, a staggering 19% year-on-year growth. Read more

The 3-Month LME aluminum price soars. Source: Fastmarkets.com.

Aluminum prices hit $1,900 per metric ton this week. Aluminum has surged 13% so far this year.

China Proposes Supply Cuts to Fight Pollution

We already predicted at the beginning of January that China’s supply would be the most important price driver to watch this year.

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According to Reuters, in February, a Chinese government document proposed an aluminum shut down for approximately a third of aluminum capacity in several provinces during the winter months. This shut-down would have a significant impact toward reducing pollution for some of China’s most polluted cities.

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We warned last month that the mostly small losses the prices our MetalMiner IndX experienced were caused by investors taking profits.

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Our suspicions were confirmed when almost all of our sub-indexes had big price rebounds this month. The Automotive MMI jumped 12.2% Raw Steels 8% and Aluminum 6%. Even our Stainless Steel MMI only dropped 1.7% and has taken off since February 1 as nickel supply is even more in question now with both the Philippines and Indonesia’s raw ore exports in question.

The bull market is on for the entire industrial metals complex. Last month’s pause was necessary for markets to digest gains but the strong positive sentiment for both manufacturing and construction shows no signs of ebbing in the U.S. and Chinese markets.