Germany

The Baltic Dry Index (BDI) usually steals the headlines when it comes to discussion of the world’s shipping fleets, and is often quoted when analysis of the global economy refers to international trade. The Dry Index is a measure of bulk shipping rates and although the Baltic Exchange quotes a range of vessel sizes and […]

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Japan is facing an electricity crunch this summer, potentially so severe, that companies such as Komatsu, the world’s No. 2 maker of construction machinery, have said they will move factories overseas if electricity supply isn’t guaranteed. Bloomberg reports that all but one of Japan’s 54 reactors are now offline after the March 11 earthquake and […]

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Outside of Europe, the Netherlands is often overlooked in the debt crisis debate and analysis, largely because it lacks the GDP of other core countries — $780 billion as compared to Germany’s $3.28 trillion and France’s $2.56 trillion. (Even Spain at $1.41 trillion and Italy at $2.01 trillion are considerably larger.) But the Netherlands is also overlooked […]

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Continued from Part One. In the autumn of 2010, the International Monetary Fund thought Greece would shrink by a rather modest 2.6 percent in 2011. We now know the economy last year fell about 7 percent. The Greek fiscal position was bad not only because of a lack of effort, but also because the economic […]

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While General Motors and its European counterparts have been having some overcapacity problems in Europe, Volkswagen, Europe’s leading carmaker, is the shining star as far as Eurozone manufacturing — and sales success — goes. VW reported record profits last week, amid speculation that the European auto market will contract once again in 2012 — the […]

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Europe’s car companies could be said to mirror the European economies in the sense that there’s a stark contrast between the haves and have-nots, or between the profitable and the loss-making. Unlike the US, where all carmakers were pulled down post-2008 and some teetered on the edge of bankruptcy while others actually went into Chapter […]

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Continued from Part One. It is widely believed by many, and even openly discussed in Brussels, that Greece could be the first to go. If it does, Portugal may well follow. It seems untenable that Italy could fail, but without collective support, it’s just as hard to see how it can stay. Italy has €33 […]

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Just about everyone outside of Europe’s ruling elite sees the Euro as a train crash in slow motion. Every day, we open our papers or turn on our screens to be greeted by yet more depressing reports of rising bond yields, squeezed bank lending, austerity measures and slowing growth, but just how bad are things […]

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A draft of the European Commission study on joint Ëœeurobonds,’ reported by the Financial Times last week, makes the intriguing suggestion that gold could be used as collateral for fundraising by European states being priced out of the commercial market. The idea is that governments would use their physical gold holdings to underwrite if not […]

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The game has changed for the nuclear industry post-Fukushima, at least in the Western world, if not globally. After previous nuclear incidents, there usually was a pause while national bodies reviewed the reasons for the event and upgraded safety standards, but the Fukushima incident seems to be impacting Europe much like Three Mile Island did […]

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