India

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It’s a story of two democratic countries and the policies they pursue vis-à-vis energy.

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So while the U.S. under President Donald Trump is kind of trying to revive its coal industry, far away India is doing the opposite – embracing clean energy with a vengeance and relying on it for much of its energy needs.

That’s one of the many reasons why India has also managed to beat the U.S. to the number two position in the renewable energy investment index released recently by UK-based accountancy firm Ernst & Young. China has continued to remain on top of this list, while the U.S. is now third. This is an annual ranking of the top 40 renewable energy markets in the world.

Those who prepared the report said that industry-friendly policies laid down by the Indian government, along with increasingly attractive economics, had changed the entire climate of the renewable energy sector of India.

Under Trump, the U.S. is seeing a shift in its energy policy. The president has issued orders to roll back many of the previous administration’s climate change policies, revive the U.S. coal industry and review the Clean Power Plan. Compare this to India’s neighbor China, which has announced that it would be spending $363 billion on developing renewable power capacity by 2020. Read more

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You should credit them for trying. As one of the first foreign multinationals to invest in the Indian market, General Motors has been persevering for over 20 years.

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This month, however, it has finally pulled the plug, announcing that it will stop making cars in India for the Indian market by the end of this year. That doesn’t mean it will cease all manufacturing. Although the firm has already stopped its production in Gujarat, it will continue with its manufacturing foundry at Talegoaon in Maharashtra, making parts and cars for export to the Asian and South American markets.

As part of a wider re-structuring aimed at improving profitability, the BBC reported, GM has put a $1 billion investment plan for India on hold, while also pulling back in South and East Africa. The firm plans to sell a 57.7% shareholding and grant management control to Isuzu in its East African operations, as well as stop selling cars in South Africa and sell its Struandale plant there to the Japanese firm in a re-structuring aimed at creating savings of $100 million per annum.

To be fair, minor successes aside, GM has struggled in India and failed to make much impact on a market originally dominated by domestic brands but latterly by Japanese and Korean firms. Even after more than 20 years, GM’s Chevrolet brand only has 1% of the market.

Commenting on the earlier plan to invest $1 billion in the market to develop its product range in what is forecast to become the world’s third largest car market, GM’s International president Stefan Jacoby is quoted as saying, “We determined that the increased investment required for an extensive and flexible product portfolio would not deliver a leadership position or long-term profitability in the domestic market.” Read more

This doubtful week, a Stanford economist made the bold proclamation that electric vehicles will completely displace their petrol and diesel counterparts by 2025, and India’s plan to triple steel production by 2030 was met with more than a few raised eyebrows.

Grand Plans

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Speaking of India, its ascent as a promising market for renewable energy has been truly impressive. Consultancy EY recently published its 2017 Renewable Energy Country Attractiveness Index (RECAI), and India took the number two spot, beating out the U.S., which slipped to third place.

India had been number nine in 2013, before Narendra Modi, who views developing renewable energy to wean India off coal as a top priority, became prime minister. Modi aims to boost India’s renewables capacity to 175 GW by 2022 (currently capacity stands at 57 GW).

India has similarly high ambitions for steel, as Sohrab Darabshaw reported earlier this week. The country aims to triple its steel production capacity by 2030, which would mean adding 182 million tons of capacity. Read more

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This morning in metals news, we have the latest rankings of promising renewables markets from EY, a continued decline in U.S. oil supply, and a weaker U.S. dollar.

The Renewables Race

China and India took the top spots on consultancy EY’s 2017 Renewable Energy Country Attractiveness Index (RECAI), edging past the United States, which had fallen from first to third place. The downward shift for the U.S. is largely due to the expected demise of the Clean Power Plan.

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Since taking office in 2014, India’s prime minister Narendra Modi has been nothing but ambitious in his plans to reduce the country’s dependency on coal and ramp up renewable energy capacity. India’s current renewables capacity stands at 57 GW, and Modi’s plan is to reach 175 GW by 2022, including 100 GW of solar. Read more

There have been some doubts over India’s stated plans to triple its steel production capacity by 2030. The Indian cabinet recently passed a revamped policy to the extent.

While some have welcomed the document, other sector experts have expressed uncertainty over the projections in the policy.

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Ratings agency Crisil, for example, said in a statement that the ambition to add 182 million tons of new steel capacities over the next 14 years under the National Steel Policy was unlikely to be achieved. Crisil’s doubts seem logical. After all, India has managed to add capacity at the annual rate of 55 million tons in the last decade.

The National Steel Policy 2017 projects crude steel production capacity of 300 million tons by 2030-31 from the present level of about 120 million tons and per-capita consumption of 158 kilograms of finished steel as against the current consumption of 61 kilograms. The policy also sees an increase in domestic availability of washed coking coal by 2030-31.

Crisil Research said that it expects 24-26 million tons of steel capacities to be added over the next five years, leading to aggregate steel capacity to rise to 140-145 million tons by 2021-22. Beyond this, Crisil said, the key factors that would determine the pace of capacity addition would be demand growth, continued government support, and pricing environment against the backdrop of global overcapacity led by China. Crisil has also projected a 6-6.5% growth in steel demand in India over the next five years, lower than the 7% annual growth rate projected by the government till 2030. Read more

India’s steel story continues to shine. The country’s consumption of finished steel goods is expected to grow by 6.1% in 2017 compared with 2016.

According to the World Steel Association (WSA), India’s steel product demand could reach 88.6 million tons in 2017, up from 83.5 million tons in 2016. WSA was also quite positive on India’s steel demand in 2018, projecting a growth of 7.1% to 94.9 million tons.

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Steel consumption in India’s neighboring country China, however, would remain flat in 2017. The WSA estimated a 2% slump in demand for 2018.

The Indian Steel Association, too, has said publicly that the country was well on its way to becoming the second largest consumer of steel, beating the United States to the second spot.

The WSA said in its report that the U.S. was expected to continue to lead the growth in the developed work in 2017-18, based on strong fundamentals, newly announced measures related to fiscal stimuli, and rising infrastructure spending. It has estimated that steel demand in the U.S. will grow by 3% in 2017 to 94.3 million tons and then by 2.9% in 2018 to 97.1 million tons.

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In India, in a further fillip to steel production, the government was contemplating making the use of Indian steel compulsory in all government or public sector funded projects. This would raise the per-capita consumption from 61 kilograms (134.5 pounds) to 160 kilograms (353 pounds) and increase production from 120 million ton to 300 million ton by 2030. The indication of this was recently given by Union Minister for Steel Chaudhary Birender Singh.

After reviewing the performance of Rashtriya Ispat Nigam Limited (RINL), the minister told reporters that “stringent measures” like imposing anti-dumping duty and minimum import price (MIP) had led to imports falling by 39% and exports increasing by 57%.

He added that the India’s national policy on steel would be unveiled soon, after receiving approval of the Union Cabinet.

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The move to make use of “Make in India” steel mandatory by government bodies comes in the wake of the central government’s commitment to support the domestic steel sector, which has been incurring losses during the last couple of years due to excess production and dumping of steel products from China into India.

Incidentally, India was aiming for a steel production capacity of 300 million tons by 2030, while the current capacity is 120 million tons and production was 90 million tons.

Think of Indian automotive manufacturing and you may think of a Japanese auto parts hub for the southeast Asia region, like Thailand only less successful. Or, you may think of failed projects like the home grown Tata Nano, but one sector that has been a rip roaring success story is motorcycles.

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According to the Financial Times, more than 16 million motorcycles and scooters were sold in India during the 2016 financial year, far more than in any other country and nearly six times the number of passenger cars sold. For many people, the motorcycle is their first and often only form of motorized transportation.

It’s a motorcycle or nothing. A car is still too much of a financial stretch for millions. So, a strong home market is to be expected but it is the growth of domestic brands and manufacturers that is the most encouraging. Those same manufacturers have been far more successful than their automotive peers in export markets. Indian motorcycle exports in that same 2016 period reached 2.5 million, up from 1.5 million five years before.

Venu Srinivasan, chairman of TVS, a particularly innovative and successful Chennai-based manufacturer, is quoted by the FT as saying “We’re hoping that within the next three years, exports should be 35 to 40% of our sales,” up from 20% today.

Image courtesy of www.bikepanthi.com.

Siddartha Lal — chairman of Eicher Motors, owner of motorbike producer Royal Enfield — has overseen the opening of showrooms in London, Paris and Madrid, hoping to capitalize on the retro appeal of the world’s oldest surviving motorcycle brand. The first Royal Enfield motorcycle was made in the U.K. in 1901, and while production in the U.K. ceased in 1970, it thankfully continued at the company’s Indian joint venture.

Royal Enfield image courtesy of www.motorivista.com.

Royal Enfield’s international ambitions have been fueled by surging sales at home of its relatively expensive (by Indian standards) bikes. The popular Classic 350 retails for about $2,000 (Rs130,000), compared with the even-less-expensive Hero Motocorp Splendor, the Indian market leader. Royal Enfield sold 60,113 motorcycles last month, compared with fewer than 52,000 in the whole of 2009. As the technology used in Royal Enfields improves, particularly the reliability of the electric motorcycles, the iconic brand is appealing to retro buyers in mature markets looking for something different, as much as poorer buyers looking for a rugged if simple motorcycle.

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But the TVS range is appealing to an altogether different buyer. Price is key, but in order to compete with its more sophisticated Japanese competitors, such as Honda Motor Co. and Yamaha, in its home market TVS has invested heavily in product development, outsourcing design to the U.K. and made extensive use of robots on the production line. Even BMW has outsourced production to TVS for motorcycles to be sold under the BMW brand in Europe. That’s confirmation, if any was required, that motorcycles are becoming one of an increasing number of industries in which India is making its mark as a global, not just domestic, player.

India’s renewable energy sector just got bigger thanks to an investment from U.K.-owned CDC Group  of up to $100 million to support renewable energy projects.

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The announcement was made by the U.K.’s Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industry Strategy Greg Clark at the inaugural India-U.K. Energy for Growth Dialogue in New Delhi on April 6. He also met with India’s Minister for Power, New & Renewable Energy, Coal and Mines, Piyush Goyal, to talk about large-scale, private sector investments between the two countries in the area of energy.

The two ministers agreed that on the power and renewables front, the focus will be on the introduction of performance-improving smart technologies, energy efficiency and accelerating the deployment of renewable energy.

For some time now, CDC Group Plc, the U.K. government’s development finance institution, has made its known that it seeks to set up its own renewable energy platform focused on the eastern part of India, and even neighboring countries such as Bangladesh.

The finance institution is contemplating leveraging its experience in running Globeleq Africa, a company in which it acquired a majority stake in 2015, for green energy investments in Asia. Globeleq has a 1,200-megawatt gren power generation capacity spread across Côte d’Ivoire, Cameroon, Kenya, South Africa and Tanzania.

As reported by MetalMiner, India aims to generate over half of its electricity through renewable and nuclear energy by 2027. The world’s largest democracy published a draft 10-year national electricity plan in December, which said it aimed to generate 275 gigawatts of renewable energy, and about 85 gw of other non-fossil fuel power such as nuclear energy, by the next decade. This would make up 57% of the country’s total electricity capacity by 2027, more than meeting its commitment to the Paris Agreement of generating 40% of its power through non-fossil fuel means by 2030.

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India has been taking massive forward strides in the renewable energy sector. Already, as per one estimate, it is set to overtake Japan as the world’s third-largest solar power market in 2017.  Taiwanese research firm EnergyTrend predicted that the global solar photovoltaic demand was expected to remain stable at 74 gw in 2017, with the Indian market experiencing sustained growth. The country was expected to add 14% to the global solar photovoltaic demand, the equivalent of the addition of 90 gw over the next five years.

As requested by Japan, the World Trade Organization (WTO) has set up a dispute settlement panel to decide the row over India’s imposition of a safeguard duty on imports of iron and steel products.

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MetalMiner has reported on this case in the past. Japan’s request was made after New Delhi imposed safeguard duties on several iron and steel products, which India claimed violated global trade rules.

India’s finance ministry imposed definitive safeguard duties on imports of hot-rolled flat products of non-alloy steel in coils to counter a surge in imports from several countries, including Japan. India’s stand has been that such cheap imports “caused injury to domestic steel industries.”

As both the nations failed to arrive at a solution, Japan petitioned the WTO for the formation of a dispute resolution panel.

Soon after the WTO announcement, though, India objected to Japan’s WTO request for a “prompt’’ resolution of its dispute against India’s duties on steel imports.

India’s contention is that there’s “no rationale” for treating the dispute any more urgently than other WTO disputes it’s involved in and the same standard should be applied to all disputes.

In December, Japan dragged India to the WTO against measures taken on imports of iron and steel products. Incidentally, Japan is the second-largest steel producer in the world.

The dispute assumes some amount of significance as both India and Japan signed a comprehensive free trade agreement, meant to avoid this type of arbitration, in 2011.

This was Japan’s second attempt to ask the WTO to set up a panel after the first was blocked by India in March. India expressed disappointment over Japan’s insistence on the WTO panel despite its “sincere efforts” to resolve the matter in a bilateral manner.

It normally takes about 20 months to settle a dispute at the WTO, but according to WTO rules, in cases of urgency, the parties to the dispute, panels and the Appellate Body make every effort to accelerate the proceedings.

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The Japanese government reportedly estimated that the tariffs could cost Japanese steel companies about $220 million through March 2018.

The safeguard duties imposed by India also gave rise to complaints from other WTO members.

The seesaw battle between steelmakers in China and India took a new twist recently with a report in a Chinese newspaper calling the Indian government on its “protectionist” stance on steel.

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The state-run Global Times newspaper said in a report, referring to India’s decision to award its first bullet train project to Japan, that India needed to have a “sober” look vis-a-vis China when it came to solutions for India’s proposed railway network revamp or its entirely new high-speed rail project.

The high-speed “bullet train” project is likely to commence in 2018 on a 315-mile (508-kilometer) route between Mumbai and Ahmedabad. It’s slated to be completed by 2023.

India has been waging a war against cheap steel imports into the country for some time now, with Chinese steel companies high on their bad guy list. The government imposed taxes in various forms not to protect its own steel industry, but to equalize import prices to production costs. Over 80% of the funding for the project is coming from Japanese investments. Read more