NALCO

It’s, of course, no secret that India’s Eastern Ghats have some of the world’s finest bauxite reserves, a crucial raw material in the making of aluminum.

FREE Download: The Monthly MMI® Report – covering the Aluminum market.

Experts have been of the opinion that once mining was allowed in full swing, the Indian aluminum industry could attract multibillion dollar investments, opening up not only employment opportunities for thousands but contributing about $25 billion to the Indian exchequer in about 15 years.

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While Indonesia has banned the export of unprocessed ore, China, its largest consumer, continues to stockpile aluminum ingredient bauxite. In neighboring India, though, producers are still trying to explore the means of increasing bauxite mining, and turning two of the country’s provinces, rich in high-grade bauxite, into the world’s “most preferred” destination for investments in the aluminum industry.

FREE Download: The Monthly MMI® Report – covering the Aluminum market.

A few days ago, at an international seminar organized by the International Bauxite, Alumina and Aluminium Society (IBAAS) in India, speakers talked of clearing hurdles that were in the way of bauxite mining in India’s Eastern Ghats, propelling the two provinces in the region, Andhra Pradesh and Odisha, into the world’s most sought-after bauxite destinations.

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India’s National Aluminum Company Limited (Nalco) and the country’s third-largest producer of aluminum, may soon be getting access to a new 65-million-ton bauxite reserve to expand its alumina refinery from 2.1 million tons a year to 3.1 million tons a year by 2016. A draft of a detailed project report (DPR) for the expansion of […]

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Last week, the Indian government finally decided to disinvest up to 10 percent of its shares in one of its prized companies – National Aluminum Co. Ltd (NALCO) – an issue that was hanging fire for a while. The Empowered Group of Ministers headed by Finance Minister P. Chidambaram had fixed the floor price at […]

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Continued from Part One. Not only steel manufacturers, but even aluminium producers in India are now vying for a larger piece of the auto market pie, what with vehicles getting increasingly lighter and stricter pollution norms. Hindalco Industries Ltd, the world’s biggest supplier of aluminum to carmakers, may double group sales to US $33 billion […]

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Continued from Part One. President of Vedanta Aluminum Ltd, India’s numero uno aluminum producer, Mukesh Kumar, told Reuters that due to the closure of some of the aluminum smelters in the US, the demand had improved marginally. Vedanta Aluminum is part of the billionaire Anil Agarwal-controlled Vedanta Group, and produces about 40 percent of the […]

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Despite a decline in profits for the first quarter reported by India’s state-run National Aluminum Company Ltd (Nalco), aluminum producers here remain optimistic about the sector. Most of this sentiment is based on the likely positive demand from the automobile and power sectors which are expected to see an increase in the last months of […]

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As we mentioned in Part One, there is a time lag between the milestones set up for the park at the planning stage and the ground realities. One of the reasons for this is that same old perennial problem that plagues almost all major projects in India – land. Delays in land acquisition have become […]

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A Bahrain-based company, Midal Cables, announced its move to set up an aluminum conductor-and-rod manufacturing unit in the Indian state of Odisha. The total project will bring in about US $53 million in investment. The more important part of that story is the location of this new unit. Midal is keen on setting up this […]

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Continued from Part One. For Nalco, one of India’s largest state-run aluminum producers, the recent slide in metal prices pinched its profit margins to the smallest in 12 years. In a PTI interview, its chairman had admitted that all their calculations with aluminum “had gone wrong.” So much so, that to shore up its bottom […]

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