Marketing Ploys: Organic, Green, Titanium?

by on
Style:
Category:
Green, Non-ferrous Metals

My husband bought a box of cereal a few weeks ago promoting the fact that it was 75% organic. Never mind what the remaining content contained. Always the skeptic, I expect that a good percentage of these marketing claims are just that…”claims”. Over on SpendMatters editor Jason Busch joked that L’Oreal (the make-up company) had been planning some cost reduction strategies. I posted a comment joking that they are likely using re-cycled plastics (to lower costs of course) and then get to slap the “environmentally friendly, green label” to the product line and charge me more in the process.

But these ploys are just for consumer products right?

Apparently not. According to this Popular Science article, industrial products companies are praising the virtues of Titanium. But the substance does not appear to back up the hype. Steel doesn’t command a price premium. What kinds of items are we talking about? Master Lock locks and golf clubs, two products heavily associated with Titanium.

I got a chuckle out of the simple experiments the author deployed to check authenticity of said products. Essentially, “hold any genuine titanium metal object to a grinding wheel (even a little grindstone on a Dremel tool will do), and it gives off a shower of brilliant white sparks unlike any softer common metal” and you know you are dealing with the real thing. If however, you see shorter yellow sparks this may just be stainless steel. And no sparks may be aluminum. Next time you are at Home Depot thinking about a bike lock, you might just consider the house label.

–Lisa Reisman

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.