New Rules for North Dakota Oil Shipments, Alcoa Shuts Down Brazilian Smelter

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Spring has sprung here at MetalCrawler and beleaguered commodity markets are hoping for a renewal themselves as steel production is predicted to fall in Japan, the once-mighty aluminum industry in Brazil faces another shutdown and new shipment rules could cause even more back-ups in transportation of North Dakota oil.

New Oil Shipment Rules

Following a spate of explosive accidents involving North Dakota crude oil, the state on Wednesday began requiring companies to remove certain liquids and gases from oil before it’s loaded onto rail cars, a move industry and state regulators believe will make for safer shipments.

Free Download: Cost Certainty for Overseas Oil Shipments

The rules, developed over the past year, require all crude from the oil patch to be treated by heat or by pressure to reduce its volatility before being loaded onto train cars. The new rules require North Dakota crude to have vapor pressure below 13.7 pounds per square inch, which is less than the 14.7 psi threshold national standard recognized as stable. Winter-blend gasoline that contains 10% ethanol is rated at 13.5 psi.Industry officials initially balked at the regulations, saying the state’s crude was being unfairly singled out and the new standards would slow production and increase costs.

Japanese Steel Production Falls to 6-Year Low

Japan’s crude steel output for April-June is forecast to drop 7.8 percent from a year earlier to the lowest for the quarter in six years, the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) said on Thursday.

The fall would mark the latest in a series of signs of economic slowdown, clouding the outlook for Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s drive to reflate the economy and spurring calls for more monetary stimulus.

South American Aluminum Production Wanes

US aluminum producer Alcoa announced this week the full shuttering of its Alumar smelter in Brazil.

Alcoa and minority partner BHP Billiton curtailed two potlines at the 440,000-metric-tons-per-year plant over the course of 2013 and 2014. Now the third and last will also be mothballed.

It’s the fifth, and largest, Brazilian smelter to be shuttered since 2009 – a major retreat for what was once one of the world’s top producing countries.

Reuters’ Andy Home writes that’s it’s symptomatic of a broader decline in primary aluminum production in South America.

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