Indian Steel Majors Look to Government for Help Against Cheap Imports

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Cold-rolled steel

ArcelorMittal, Inc., as reported by The Economic Times, suffered weak Indian domestic demand for steel as the rupee depreciated by more than 30% since 2010, which also made imports difficult. ArcelorMittal had to pay more import duties to get ore into its CEO’s native country (7.5%) as opposed to imports from Free Trade Agreement (FTA) countries, who paid just 0.8%, adding to the company’s financial burden.

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In February this year, Standard & Poors downgraded the company’s credit rating on lower than-expected profit though it maintained a stable outlook, saying ArcelorMittal would generate at least neutral cash flow and avoid meaningful debt increases over the next two years.

Weak Demand, Rising Imports

Most of India’s steel majors, such as ArcelorMittal, have, in recent times, been left trying to cope with weak demand and rising imports from China, Japan and South Korea.

Steel Authority of India Ltd.’s C.S. Verma, for example, has gone on record saying he is optimistic about a recovery in domestic demand in India, though that, to some extent, could be offset by a continued slump in export markets. Along with a few others, he feels steel prices, having plunged to a historic low, will only recover going forward.

A report released by Dun & Bradstreet earlier this week, reported  sentiments generally in tune with the sentiments of executives such as Verma. While the outlook for mining and metals industry remained volatile globally, in India, though, the formation of a stable government had “reaffirmed corporate and consumer sentiment significantly,” the report said.

The latest Sector Outlook for Metals in India 2015 report by the agency said demand was likely to improve as fiscal policy was better geared toward an investment-led growth strategy. The government policy shift could provide an overall metal sector could benefit.

Government Help

India’s Modi government and the local governments are trying their best to improve the local situation. Indian Steel and Mines Minister Narendra Singh Tomar announced that the government had planned to set up four steel plants in the provinces of Jharkhand, Karnataka, Odisha and Chhattisgarh.

Of the four, the one in Chhattisgarh is touted as the most important. SAIL and the National Mineral Development Corporation plan to create an ultra-mega steel plant there. It’s a multibillion-dollar greenfield project that, when complete, will have a 3 million metric-ton-per-year capacity. It is planned that both the company and the Chhattisgarh government will sign agreements for the project when Prime Minister Narendra Modi visits Chhattisgarh on May 9.

The author, Sohrab Darabshaw, contributes an Indian perspective on industrial metals markets to MetalMiner.

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