Even With Rio Tinto plc Bullish, Copper Prices Have Further to Fall

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The red metal met the Red Cross earlier this week in the kickoff post of our series on health-acquired infections (HAI) and copper’s role in the war against them – but what hospital procurement officers and facilities management departments may want to know is, what’s up with the copper price?

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First step in the multi-step program of “What’s Up With the Copper Price?” is a look back at where prices have been: MetalMiner’s monthly Copper MMI® registered a value of 75 in June, a decrease of 2.6% from 77 in May.

Copper_Chart_June-2015_FNL

The index decline was driven mainly by spot and 3-month London Metal Exchange prices, US copper producer grades 102 and 110, and Chinese copper wire.

What’s Up With That?

Second step in the multi-step program of “What’s Up With the Copper Price?” is knowing some of the underlying fundamentals that may have to do with its shift. For that, we turn to MetalMiner Editor-at-large Stuart Burns, who writes that:

“Analysts expect China’s copper demand to grow by 4% this year, yet that figure is based on considerable use in power grid investment and assumes government spending plans will be met. Power grid investment actually fell by 8.65% in April, according to the FT, and in the first four months of this year China completed Rmb86.6bn of grid investment, only 20% of the planned amount for the year.

Investors agree with the pessimistic outlook cutting their net long positions in copper, joining Chinese speculators who have been betting against copper all year.

A CNBC report says recent weakness is due to weak premiums, high scrap discounts and a failure of the seasonally strongest quarter for copper to translate into solid demand. China’s factories are now approaching a summer slow-down and with it lower metal consumption.”

Outside China, there’s always Mongolia – and the Oyu Tolgoi copper mine, from which Rio Tinto‘s recent bullishness is born. According to the FT, “Rio Tinto recently forecast that copper prices will recover faster than expected with demand outstripping supply within two years. This bullish forecast comes as the Anglo-Australian miner steps up talks in May with the Mongolian government aimed at finalizing a deal on a $6 billion expansion at Oyu Tolgoi, which had been stalled for months. The lack of new copper projects in the pipeline could result in a market deficit earlier than expected,” the paper indicates, “but even if Rio Tinto was right, 2 years is still a long period of time where we could see further price declines.”

What’s Up With the Market?

For the third step in the multi-step program of “What’s Up With the Copper Price?”, we cast our focus onto the future by turning to our metals procurement specialist, Raul de Frutos:

“Copper prices have been rallying since February and, in the short term, they could continue doing so. For the short term, consider placing orders now for known demand. Don’t buy long-term forward, as copper is in a bearish market and we expect prices to lose steam soon and come back to lower levels.”

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Actual Monthly Copper Prices, Trends

At $6,088 per metric ton, the primary copper cash price was down 2.5% on the LME. Last month, the price of US copper producer grade 110 dropped 2.2% to $3.52 per pound. The price of US copper producer grade 102 decreased by 2.1% this month, ending at $3.71 per pound. The copper 3-month price saw a small decline on the LME this month, falling from $6,218 to $6,090 per metric ton. Chinese copper wire fell a slight 0.9% over the past month to $7,076 per metric ton. The cash price of Chinese copper finished the month at $7,233 per metric ton after dropping 0.9%. Korean copper strip closed the month at $8.00 per kilogram after dropping 0.3%.

The Japanese copper cash price climbed 4.4%, settling at $6,264 per metric ton.

Chinese bright copper scrap traded sideways last month, staying around $5,370 per metric ton.

FREE Download: Compare With The May MMI® Report.

The Copper MMI® collects and weights 12 global copper metal price points to provide a unique view into copper price trends over a 30-day period. For more information on the Copper MMI®, how it’s calculated or how your company can use the index, please drop us a note at: info (at) agmetalminer (dot) com.

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