January MMI Report: The Oprah of Dead Cat Bounces

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Source: Adobe Stock/intheskies

Just like Oprah giving out cars, our January Metal Price Trends report was generous with the dead cat bounces this month. You get a dead cat bounce, copper! You get one, too, aluminum! You get a dead cat bounce, raw steels! Everyone gets a dead cat bounce!

Free Sample Report: Our January Metal Buying Outlook

Okay, not everyone. Construction, stainless steel, renewables and rare earths all lost ground and automotive was merely steady.

MM-IndX_TRENDS_Chart_January2016_FNL-TOPVALUE100

Still, it’s the most positive movement we’ve seen for many of these metals since early last year. We say they’re dead cat bounces — a cruel-sounding investment term for a temporary recovery from a prolonged decline or bear market, followed by the continuation of the downtrend (sorry, kitties) — because there is little reason to be optimistic that any of these gains will continue.

Stop Me Before I Bounce Again!

The main driver of commodity, and now stock market losses, has been the slowing Chinese economy and it’s looking worse this year than it did at the end of last. Financial institutions such as RBS are even advising clients to sell everything, save bonds, that’s not tied down.

This is great news for buyers but exactly what metal producers don’t want to hear. What’s worse, for them, is that everything the Chinese government is doing to try to turn their economy around, including a panic button system for its stock markets that actually caused more panic, isn’t working. My colleague Raul De Frutos also pointed out that purposely devaluing the yuan actually hurts metal prices.

How Low Can it Go?

The other big driver of the commodity price rout, the price of oil, shows no signs of turning around, either. Oil hit $30 per barrel this week stoking bankruptcy fears among US energy companies and it even temporarily created some nervousness among OPEC nations who clamored for an emergency meeting.

So don’t expect these price increases to continue as transportation and production costs follow oil’s race to the bottom. My colleague at our sister site Spendmatters, Kaitlyn McAvoy, reported that Goldman Sachs is predicting $20 per barrel for oil this year.  It’s not a very happy new year for metal producers… or cats.

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