EPA Clean Power Plan Won’t be Stayed While It’s Argued in Court

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An appeals court will allow the EPA Clean Power Plan to stay in effect while it is argued in court and China’s plans to tame its largely state-run metals producers are starting to become more clear.

Clean Power Plan Will Stay in Effect

The Washington D.C. Circuit on Thursday refused to put the Environmental Protection Agency Clean Power Plan on hold until legal challenges to the rule are completed, but they did fast-track a trial on the legality of the new rule.

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The Obama administration considers this an early victory as it looks to defend and implement the sweeping regulations that would slash carbon emissions from existing power plants.

29 States and several industry groups petitioned to overturn the CPP or, at the very least, block it from being implemented while the legal battle plays out. They’ve argued that they’ll be irreparably harmed by starting the compliance process, even though they’re likely to succeed in convincing the court that the rule is illegal.

However, the D.C. Circuit panel shot the request down in a two-page order, though it said the appeals court would expedite the consideration of the case and schedule oral arguments for June 2.

China’s Metals Transition Plan

China’s plans to set up funds to manage coal and steel capacity closures and stockpiling schemes for metals such as aluminum have offered nervous markets some clarity on the likely future make-up of the country’s sprawling and predominantly state-run metals and mining industries. But it’s still way too early to tell if these initiatives even can be successful in taming overproduction.

As the world’s largest producer of aluminum, steel and other metals, and the biggest consumer of copper and iron ore, China is crucial to global metals markets which have slumped in the past year as Chinese industrial demand growth slowed.

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After weeks of talks between government officials and leading metals producers, Beijing looks set to take a direct approach to managing capacity cuts and layoffs in coal and steel. It will provide smaller-scale financing deals to groups of producers of non-ferrous metals, such as aluminum, for stockpiling and capacity cutback initiatives.

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