China Aims to Be Metals Price Setter, Not Just Largest Consumer

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Source: Adobe Stock/kropman.

China, this year, is becoming more than just the world’s largest metals consumer, it’s also taking a larger role in setting metals prices. While oil prices have crept up this summer, another selloff could be caused when refined products in storage finally come to market.

China is Taking a Bigger Role in Setting Metals Prices

The prices of metals from aluminum to zinc have long swayed to the beat of the world’s largest manufacturing nation, Reuters’ Andy Home writes.

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But this is the year that China has emerged from the limelight to take center-stage in the trading of those metals. On one day alone, March 10, trading volumes on the Dalian Exchange iron ore contract exceeded one billion metric, more than the combined annual output of the world’s biggest three producers, Rio Tinto Group, BHP Billiton and Vale SA.

Another Oil Glut is Likely Due to Products in Storage

In its July Oil Market Report, the International Energy Agency warned about shockingly high levels of refined oil products sitting in storage. Gasoline, diesel and heating oil are built up to such high levels in so many parts of the world, that a sharp rise in crude oil prices is unlikely in the short run, oilprice.com reported.

Two-Month Trial: Metal Buying Outlook

The IEA said that “the fact that crude oil has in the past two months moved within a range in the high $40s/bbl should be a relief for some producers.” But it went on to caution that “the existence of very high oil stocks is a threat to the recent stability of oil prices.”

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