Army Corps Will Approve Dakota Access, Trump Trade Advisor Puts Germany on Notice

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Oil pipeline
Source: iStock

North Dakota Senator John Hoeven (R.) said the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is ready to provide the easement necessary to build the final leg of the $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline under North Dakota’s Lake Oahe.

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Hoeven said he spoke with acting Secretary of the Army Robert Speer and Vice President Mike Pence Tuesday.

The Army Corps issued a statement Wednesday saying it had initiated the steps outlined in President Donald Trump’s directive to complete the 1,172-mile crude oil pipeline but that no permit has been granted. A decision will be made “once a full review and analysis is completed” in accordance with the directive, Malcolm Frost, a spokesman, said in the statement.

U.S. Representative Kevin Cramer, a Republican from North Dakota, also said that the Army Corps had notified Congress of its plan to grant the easement. A spokesman for the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and others that have fought against its construction, said Tuesday that it will challenge any suspension of the federal environmental review that previously held up the pipeline. However, the Tribe lost a previous challenge in federal court when a judge approved the final eight miles of the route, noting that the proposed route does not go through tribal lands.

Navarro: Germany Takes Advantage of Undervalued Euro

Peter Navarro, the head of President Trump’s new National Trade Council, recently gave an interview to the Financial Times. The economist told the FT that Germany is using a “grossly undervalued” euro to “exploit” the U.S. The euro has weakened against the dollar over the past two years.

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He also told the FT that one of the administration’s trade priorities is unwinding and repatriating the international supply chains on which many U.S. multinational companies rely, “It does the American economy no long-term good to only keep the big box factories where we are now assembling ‘American’ products that are composed primarily of foreign components,” he said. “We need to manufacture those components in a robust domestic supply chain that will spur job and wage growth.”

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