Niocorp One Step Closer to Producing Scandium in Nebraska; No OPEC Output Cut Extension Without One for Iran

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NioCorp Developments Ltd. has successfully produced high-purity 99.9% commercial grade Scandium Trioxide from its Elk Creek, Ne., Superalloy Materials Project and the company has finalized plans for a proposed scandium purification circuit there.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

Niocorp also announced that it anticipates public release of the results of its Elk Creek Feasibility Study in the second calendar quarter of 2017. Following the release of the study, the company intends to intensify efforts to secure government permits and obtain project financing to prepare for the launch of construction operations in Nebraska.

NioCorp’s successful production of a high-purity commercial grade scandium, an element used to make superstrong and light alloys used in both the automotive and aerospace industries, was conducted at SGS Mineral Services lab in Lakefield, Ont., Canada. This is a major milestone in Niocorp’s plans to become one of the world’s largest producers of the high-value metal. A 99.9% purity level, otherwise known as 3Ns or “three nines” scandium, meets or exceeds the purity needed for the additive’s use in virtually all of its mainstream commercial applications, including ultra-high-performance aluminum-scandium alloys for the aerospace and automotive industries, in the solid oxide fuel cell industry, and in other defense and non-defense applications.

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NioCorp said in a news release that the test showed its scandium product meets or exceeds the purity specifications of all potential customers with whom it has been in discussions.

OPEC Output Cut Threatened: Saudi Arabia Demands Iranian Cut

Saudi Arabia may demand that Iran, which is allowed a slight rise in output under the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries’ deal with member-states and non-members such as Russia, commit to an output reduction as a condition of continuing the cuts, people familiar with the kingdom’s thinking told S&P Global Platts.

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