Aluminum MMI Inches Up While Base Metals Fall

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Industrial metals for the most part fell in April, but that wasn’t the case for aluminum. The lightweight metal outperformed its peers as aluminum is expected to be the next target of supply-side reform in China, according to Goldman Sachs.

The New Steel?

While China tries to transition from a manufacturing economy to a service-driven one, it is aiming to cut industrial overcapacity due to environmental problems. China previously indicated its strong intentions to implement supply-side reforms in the steel industry. As a result, steel prices in China rose by 70% in less than a year.

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China’s energy intensive aluminum smelters receive nearly 90% of their energy needs from coal. In addition, China has received a lot of international pressure to reduce its aluminum capacity. For these reasons, aluminum could be the new steel this year.

To start, China announced in late February that it would cut as much as 30% of its aluminum production over the winter months. As my colleague Stuart Burns put it, “Beijing has shown solid intent in this direction, already denying planning approval to 2 million tons of new capacity in China’s northwest province of Xinjiang and clamping down hard on plants elsewhere that it deems to be failing environmental standards.” In addition, industry watchers believe that this might just be the beginning as more closures are expected to come in heavily industrialized provinces.

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