This Morning in Metals: India Takes Steps to Boost Steel Production

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This morning in metals news, India looks to boost its steel output, China expresses concern about the Trump administration’s Section 232 probe into aluminum and steel imports, and researchers have discovered a new, environmentally friendly way to extract copper.

India Prepares for Surge of Steel Production

India is looking to ramp up its steel output to 300 million tons, according to a report in the Press Trust of India.

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Steel Minister Choudhary Birender Singh announced today the steps that will be taken to ramp up production. Two new policies aim to boost production to 300 million tons by 2030, according to the report.

Self-sufficiency is the objective of the new national steel policy. Singh added the government has reached out to Coal India Ltd. to assure that there will be enough fuel to support the uptick in production.

China Awaits U.S. 232 Investigation Verdicts

According to the Chinese Commerce Ministry, China is “concerned” about the impending result of the Trump administration’s Section 232 investigation into aluminum imports — one for which China has been the central focus.

In a report from Reuters, Sun Jiwen, a spokesman for the Commerce Ministry, said the basis for the investigations — national security — is too broadly defined.

Yesterday, Reuters reported Trump was growing increasingly frustrated with China, particularly in reference to its handling of North Korea.

Unsurprisingly, there are tensions and concerns on both sides of the equation (although tariffs would affect other nations and not just China). Many expect the Trump administration to announce the Section 232 findings in the near future.

A New Way to Extract Copper

MIT researchers have discovered a way to separate pure copper from sulfur-based minerals while eliminating toxic byproducts in the process.

According to a report in MIT News, the research team identified the proper temperature and chemical mixture in order to “selectively separate pure copper and other metallic trace elements from sulfur-based minerals using molten electrolysis.”

The article notes: “Copper is in increasing demand for use in electric vehicles, solar energy, consumer electronics and other energy efficiency targets. Most current copper extraction processes burn sulfide minerals in air, which produces sulfur dioxide, a harmful air pollutant that has to be captured and reprocessed, but the new method produces elemental sulfur, which can be safely reused, for example, in fertilizers. The researchers also used electrolysis to produce rhenium and molybdenum, which are often found in copper sulfides at very small levels.”

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In addition to being a fascinating scientific discovery and process, a clean way to extract an increasingly important product like copper is a great development.

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