This Afternoon in Metals: Gold Moves Up, Germany Awaits G20 Steel Talk

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This afternoon in metals news, gold inches upward, partially stemming from concerns on the heels of a North Korean missile test; Germany, among others, waits to hear what the U.S. has to say about steel; and, in anticipation of protectionist policies from the Trump administration, U.S. Steel rose by 8% in June.

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Gold Up on N. Korea Concerns

After North Korea’s recent test strike of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), the price of gold ticked upward, a common reaction for the safe-haven metal.

“Safe-haven buying re-emerged in the gold market after the latest missile test in North Korea,” ANZ Research said in a note to Reuters.

Also looming over the gold price are the minutes of June’s Fed meeting, which many awaiting for news about the Fed’s plans for further interest rate hikes this year, Reuters reported.

Germany Anticipates Trump Administration’s Words on Steel

While China is the central focus of the Trump administration’s Section 232 investigations of steel and aluminum imports, other nations are interested in the investigations’ results.

Germany is among those nations, as a top exporter of steel to the U.S. The Germans are waiting to hear from President Donald Trump during the G20 summit, which begins on Friday in Hamburg, Germany.

When asked during a news conference Wednesday whether steel would be an issue discussed during the G20 summit, German government spokesman Steffen Seibert said, “That will become apparent. It also remains to be seen what the American president brings (to the meeting).”

U.S. Steel Up Big

Many expect the Trump administration to announce new tariffs or quotas, a result of the 232 investigations into steel and aluminum imports launched in April.

While the policy recommendations of those probes haven’t been announced, some U.S. businesses are feeling pretty good about what those protectionist policies might do for them. For example, U.S. Steel went up 8% in June.

But what happens next? A self-imposted Department of Commerce deadline came and went this past Friday with no announcement of the steel investigation’s conclusion. According to Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act, the Secretary of Commerce has 270 days to prepare a submit a report to the president.

As such, the Trump administration still has plenty of time to think about the subject of steel imports. With that said, any momentum felt by the domestic steel industry as a result of talk of impending protectionist policies could begin to deflate the longer the process drags out. Many are looking to Trump’s participation at the Group of 20 summit later this week for more specific answers regarding the president’s thoughts on steel overcapacity.

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