This Morning in Metals: Chinese Steel Exports Down to 3-Year Low

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This morning in metals news, Chinese exports of steel are down to levels not seen in a few years, aluminum prices get a boost from talks of Chinese output cuts and a group of former White House economists wrote President Donald Trump in an attempt to convince him not to go forward with imposing tariffs on steel imports.

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Steel Exports Down in China

Chinese steel exports are down to three-year lows, according to a Bloomberg report.

Chinese excess capacity has been at the heart of the Trump administration’s Section 232 investigation into steel (and aluminum) imports, but it appears as if that oversupply is on the decline.

According to Bloomberg, China is “exporting a lot less of the metal as government-ordered closures of illegal plants tighten supply and improving local demand spurs mills to sell more at home.”

Aluminum Prices Get Good News

Sticking with China, aluminum prices surged 2.8% on news of Chinese production cuts, according to Reuters.

In related news, our Stuart Burns wrote about the issue of Chinese oversupply this morning, and whether announced measures to close plants — in efforts to cut production — are actually meaningful.

Former White House Economists on Section 232 Tariffs: Don’t Do It

When it comes to the the Trump administration’s Section 232 investigation of steel imports and the possibility it could hit foreign suppliers with tariffs, a number of former White House economists agree on one thing: It’s a bad idea.

According to a report in The Los Angeles Times and other outlets, 15 former White House economists sent a letter to the White House explaining why the tariffs would be a bad idea. According to the report, the letter is signed by economists from both sides of the aisle, and includes the signatures of two former Federal Reserve chairmen: Ben Bernanke and Alan Greenspan.

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It’s unlikely that such a letter will have much pull with Trump and his administration at large, but it is notable for the simple fact that a group of ideologically differing economists agree on a singular issue (in this case, whether or not to impose steel tariffs).

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