This Morning in Metals: Newly Developed Magnesium Sheet Billed as 1.5 Times Stronger Than Aluminum

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This morning in metals news, a team of researchers has developed a magnesium alloy that is billed to be at least 1.5 times stronger than aluminum sheet metal, copper is up and one analyst writes that China should not be the primary focus of the U.S. steel industry.

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A New Metal

Aluminum is renowned for its many qualities, including its strength, light weight and durability.

Now, scientists have developed a new magnesium alloy that appears to be even stronger than aluminum sheet metal.

According to a phys.org report, a team at NIMS and Nagaoka University of Technology has developed a high-strength magnesium sheet metal that “has excellent formability comparable to that of the aluminum sheet metal currently used in body panels of some automobiles.”

According to the report, the new magnesium alloy is lighter than aluminum and composed of common metals, making it a low-cost material.

Copper Gets a Boost

Copper rose Monday on news of supply disruptions and a weak dollar, according to Reuters.

The metal crossed the $6,000 dollar mark while the U.S. dollar approached 13-month lows.

Elsewhere, halting of mine operations also pushed prices up. In Chile, talks last week fizzled between union workers and management at the Zaldivar copper mine.

According to the report, the government-mediated talks will continue into this week.

China’s Not the Problem?

Ever since the Trump administration announced Section 232 investigations into steel and aluminum imports, China has been the primary focus. Chinese excess capacity, the administration and many in the U.S. aluminum and steel industries argue, has driven prices down worldwide and negatively impacted U.S. primary producers.

Clyde Russell, however, writing for Reuters, argues that China isn’t the U.S.’s biggest obstacle when it comes to strengthening its domestic steel industry.

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Russell points to statistics showing China’s relatively small U.S. market share, which even lags behind fellow Asian countries Japan, South Korea and India. In May, China was the 10th-largest supplier of steel products to the U.S., Russell writes.

Russell argues that rather than looking at China, the U.S. should focus on fellow North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) partners Canada and Mexico, which exported significantly more steel in May to the U.S. than did China.

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