No Resolution For Section 232s, Yet, As Trump Administration Mulls Options

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Talk of tariffs stemming from the Trump administration’s Section 232 investigations of steel and aluminum imports has seemingly softened over the last couple of weeks, but the overall trade dynamic between the to countries remains tense.

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First, President Trump told the Wall Street Journal last week that “we don’t want to do it at this moment” in reference to trade actions on steel imports resulting from the administration’s Section 232 investigation.

Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 gives the Secretary of Commerce authority to conduct comprehensive investigations to determine the effects of imports of any article on national security. The investigations were announced open in April. By law, the investigation must be concluded, including a submitted report, within 270 days of its opening.

More recently, a shift toward a negotiated agreement seems to be gaining favor. According to Inside U.S. Trade ($), Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross suggested “voluntary” agreements, according to House Ways & Means Committee members who met with Ross on July 27.

However, in terms of getting any additional clarity on what the administration plans to do, the committee members left the July 27 briefing without much of that.

“I don’t think that there was a lot of clarification,” Richard Neal (D-MA) told Inside U.S. Trade.
The deadlines for the Section 232 investigations are well down the road (not until January), but, until then, talk is likely to continue about what the administration will or won’t do, in addition to what other relevant parties could do in retaliation.
In similar news, the administration and many in the U.S. steel industry have pointed to China’s excess capacity as the major problem for the domestic industry, leading to suggestions of tariffs or quotas targeting China (but also affecting other steel-producing countries).
Talk of trade remedies against China, however, hasn’t just been limited to steel and aluminum.
Bloomberg reported earlier today that the Trump administration could go after China for perceived intellectual property violations.
According to the Bloomberg report, the administration is considering invoking another article — Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974.
In essence, Section 301 is the mechanism by which the U.S. can respond to countries in violation of trade agreements or engaging in unfair trade practices. The move would further increase tensions between the U.S. and China, particularly in light of Trump’s admonishments of China for not doing enough to rein in North Korea.

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