DOC Rules on Silicon Imports From Three Countries

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The U.S. Department of Commerce. qingwa/Adobe Stock

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s ruling Aug. 8 on Chinese aluminum foil wasn’t the only determination it announced that day.

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On top of the foil ruling — in which the department ruled that Chinese foil imports benefited unfairly from government subsidies, and as a result could be subject to duties of up to 81% — the DOC also issued a preliminary countervailing duty determination regarding silicon imports from Australia, Brazil and Kazakhstan.

According to a DOC release, silicon exporters from Australia, Brazil and Kazakhstan benefited from countervailing subsides of 16.23%, 3.69 to 52.07%, and 120%, respectively.

“We will continue to review all information related to this preliminary determination,” Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross said in the release. “The Trump Administration remains vigilant against foreign actors that take advantage of American workers and businesses.”

Imports of silicon metal from Australia, Brazil, and Kazakhstan were valued at an estimated $33.9 million, $60.0 million, and $17.5 million, respectively, according to the DOC release.

The petitioner is Globe Specialty Metals, Inc., which has production facilities in Alabama, New York, Ohio, and West Virginia.

The DOC’s rulings on silicon and aluminum foil are representative of the Trump administration’s emphasis on antidumping and countervailing duty probes. According to the DOC release, the administration has launched 64 investigations between Jan. 20 and Aug. 8, marking a 40% increase from the same timeframe last year.

Last year, the U.S. collected $1.5 billion in duties on $14 billion of imported goods “found to be underpriced or subsidized by foreign governments,” according to the DOC announcement.

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