Renewables MMI: Tax Bill to Put Half of U.S. Wind Power Projects In Jeopardy?

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The Renewables MMI dropped 2.5% for the month of December, ending at a value of 78.

Here’s What Happened

  • Since our recalibration of this index back in May 2017 to better take into account cobalt price fluctuations, the Renewables MMI has been slowly but surely gaining ground the latter half of 2017, hitting a high of 84 in September.
  • Within this basket of metals and materials used in the renewable energy industry, the Big Heavy is the U.S. steel plate price. Yet from November to December, that price point only dropped a single dollar per short ton.
  • The China steel plate price, however, did move much more – increasing 4.3% on the month.

What’s Going On in the Background?

  • The biggest news for the renewables industry has been the controversial tax plan put forth by legislators and still awaiting final House/Senate reconciliation – mainly, the fact that the Base Erosion Anti-Abuse Tax (BEAT) has been kept intact in the latest version of the Senate bill.
  • As Sydney Lazarus wrote in MetalMiner last week, currently, “many companies have large multinational corporations finance wind or solar energy projects, and in return, give the latter the renewable energy credit that the government provides.” But the BEAT tax, which is meant to discourage multinationals from moving profits abroad — and which the Senate bill kept intact — would make the crucial solar investment tax credit (ITC) and wind production tax credit (PTC) “unusable for multinational banks and other corporations who have low tax rates,” according to this article.
  • It’s unclear if this move was intentional or not, but regardless, it injects huge uncertainty into the renewable energy industry as the bill hurtles toward law. (Some, such as American Wind Energy Association’s Peter L. Kelley, say it “could put an end to more than half of the country’s wind projects,” as reported by Lazarus.

What Metal Buyers Should Look Out For

  • Keep an eye out on steel plate’s raw material inputs — iron ore prices increased over the past month, as we reported in our December Monthly Buying Outlook, while coal prices decreased. Although steel plate prices appear a bit sluggish at the moment, China’s demand is something worthy of paying attention.

Key Price Movers and Shakers

  • The steel plate price in the U.S. rose from $692 to $693 per short ton for December.
  • Steel plate prices from China rose 4.3% to $685.10 per metric ton, while the Korean plate price dropped.
  • While we’re still waiting for the final GOES coil price this month, the neodymium price dropped considerably, doing its part to drive the overall index reading down for the month.

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