Author Archives: Sydney Lazarus

This doubtful week, a Stanford economist made the bold proclamation that electric vehicles will completely displace their petrol and diesel counterparts by 2025, and India’s plan to triple steel production by 2030 was met with more than a few raised eyebrows.

Grand Plans

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Speaking of India, its ascent as a promising market for renewable energy has been truly impressive. Consultancy EY recently published its 2017 Renewable Energy Country Attractiveness Index (RECAI), and India took the number two spot, beating out the U.S., which slipped to third place.

India had been number nine in 2013, before Narendra Modi, who views developing renewable energy to wean India off coal as a top priority, became prime minister. Modi aims to boost India’s renewables capacity to 175 GW by 2022 (currently capacity stands at 57 GW).

India has similarly high ambitions for steel, as Sohrab Darabshaw reported earlier this week. The country aims to triple its steel production capacity by 2030, which would mean adding 182 million tons of capacity. Read more

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This morning in metals news, we have the latest rankings of promising renewables markets from EY, a continued decline in U.S. oil supply, and a weaker U.S. dollar.

The Renewables Race

China and India took the top spots on consultancy EY’s 2017 Renewable Energy Country Attractiveness Index (RECAI), edging past the United States, which had fallen from first to third place. The downward shift for the U.S. is largely due to the expected demise of the Clean Power Plan.

Free Download: The May 2017 MMI Report

Since taking office in 2014, India’s prime minister Narendra Modi has been nothing but ambitious in his plans to reduce the country’s dependency on coal and ramp up renewable energy capacity. India’s current renewables capacity stands at 57 GW, and Modi’s plan is to reach 175 GW by 2022, including 100 GW of solar. Read more

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Now’s the time to buy those solar panels you’ve been saving up for. This week, Tesla announced that it is taking orders and deposits for solar roof tiles that look stunningly like… regular roof tiles. But therein lies the appeal, and the $42-per-square-foot cost isn’t so bad either, lower than what industry analysts expected, Bloomberg reported.

Keep Your Eye on Silver

This growing interest in solar energy has been supporting the demand for silver, according to the Silver Institute’s World Silver Survey 2017, which Taras Berezowsky covered on MetalMiner this week. As Berezowsky wrote, “According to the report, silver demand for photovoltaic applications shot up 34% to reach 76.6 million ounces. This growth was the strongest since 2010, and it was driven by a 49% increase in global solar panel installations.”

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In addition, “automotive will be an interesting sector to watch,” Berezowsky wrote. Silver demand could be driven up further as the world moves towards electric vehicles — whose engines and circuit boards require silver — however slowly, as Stuart Burns noted earlier this morning.

Bearish Times

“If you are a metal buyer, it doesn’t matter if you buy aluminum, copper, steel or tin,” Raul de Frutos wrote in his commodities outlook this week. “The information in this article is important for you.” Commodities may have enjoyed a bull market in early 2016, but things appear to have shifted to the bear-ish. “Commodities not only have struggled to make new headway,” de Frutos wrote. “In the past few days they have weakened significantly. Recent moves in China have caused a significant shift of sentiment in financial markets.” Read more

This morning in metals news, we’ve seen prices for copper and gold reach three-week highs and lows, respectively.

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Threat of Supply Disruption Has Driven Up Copper Prices

Copper prices reached a three-week high today, Reuters reported, driven by potential supply disruptions. This news comes after yesterday’s rally near the Grasberg copper mine in Indonesia. Thousands of workers from the Indonesian unit of Freeport McMoRan Inc. took part, protesting against layoffs that resulted from the company’s contract dispute with the government.

Freeport had laid off 10% of its workforce, with potentially more layoffs to come. As a response, the union representing the workers has threatened to strike for the month of May.

A Three-Week Low for Gold Prices

In contrast, gold prices fell on Monday as the threat of a U.S. government shutdown faded and the U.S. dollar edged slightly higher. The metal has dropped to $1,255.50 per ounce, the lowest gold prices have been since April 10, according to FactSet data. Political tensions in Europe had kept gold prices up so far this year, but that trend seems to have been reversed.

In related news, S&P Global Platts reported that gold production in China, the world’s top gold producer as well as consumer, fell significantly in Q1 2017. In this past quarter, China produced 101.2 tons of gold, which is a 9.3% drop compared with 111.6 tons in Q1 2016.

Bernanke Argues in Favor of a Border Adjustment Tax

Former Federal Reserve Chair Ben Bernanke came out in support of the proposed border adjustment tax (BAT), suggesting to CNBC that the GOP had not presented the idea well. Bernanke argued that a stronger dollar would negate any negative effects of the BAT – which would tax imports and exempt exports – by increasing U.S. companies’ purchasing power and lowering the cost of overseas manufacturing.

First, some good news. Congress approved a week-long spending measure today, narrowly preventing a government shutdown from occurring tomorrow, which also happens to be President Donald Trump’s 100th day in office. Phew.

And talking about nail-biters, this week kicked off with the first round of French presidential elections. Advancing to the May 7 runoff are independent centrist Emmanuel Macron, who had come out on top with 23.75% of the votes, and controversial far-right candidate Marine Le Pen, who won 21.53%.

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The results “may not have matched Britain’s Brexit referendum of last year or the United States of America’s presidential election of Donald Trump in upsetting the pollsters,” wrote MetalMiner co-founder Stuart Burns, “but it does say a lot about the mind set of French voters all the same.”

Over in the U.S., this week the Trump administration announced plans to slash individual and business income tax rates. The proposal will have businesses, big or small, paying 15% (the current corporate tax is 35%). As for a border adjustment tax on imports, the latest news reports are saying Trump has abandoned the idea. This past week, Jeff Yoders spoke with Americans for Prosperity and Freedom Partners on this very topic of a BAT.

“AFP sees the BAT as very similar to a VAT and [AFP thinks] that its overall impact would be similar,” Yoders wrote. “I, myself, have been known to a be a VAT conscientious objector, as well. I do think, though, that the idea of a BAT, while it certainly has VAT similarities, is intriguing in that it uses the corporate income tax to encourage manufacturing in the U.S.”

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To send off our (erstwhile) colleague Jeff Yoders, let’s end this Week-in-Review with another article from him. This week, he published the final part of an interview with Dean A. Pinkert, former International Trade Commission vice chair, on issues facing metals producers and manufacturers; the Trump administration; and tax policy. Don’t miss it!