Part Two: How Green is My Supply Chain?

by on
Style:
Category:
Green

In part one of this two-part series, I discussed the growing importance of the carbon footprint. Some important questions might remain. How do I measure the carbon footprint of my products, and why should I? There are three reasons:

(more…)

Part One: How Green Is My Supply Chain?

by on
Style:
Category:
Environment, Green

The concept of climate change and the need to reduce carbon emissions is far from widely accepted in the U.S., but viewpoints are beginning to change, largely due to customer demand. Japan and the European Union were early converts to the argument that we are changing our planet’s weather patterns, and much of the current legislation is appearing in these countries. Given the trend, though, the U.S. will not be far behind.

We have all heard a great deal about carbon emissions and the ways both individuals and companies can reduce electricity usage and save on transportation. That’s the easy part. The expenditure is simple to quantify, and the carbon emissions are easy to measure. The much larger challenge for companies is measuring the carbon footprint of a product, defined here as the total set of greenhouse gas emissions caused by the production of one unit of a product. This implies knowledge of the carbon emissions released at each stage of the supply chain and production as well as the transportation of all the raw materials and components. To offer an example, the Carbon Trust, an independent company funded by the UK government, recently illustrated the components that create the carbon footprint of a can of cola.

(more…)