Commentary

Dean A. Pinkert is a partner in Hughes Hubbard’s International Trade practice. He is a former Commissioner of the U.S. International Trade Commission. Pinkert was nominated by President Bush and confirmed by the Senate in 2007, and was designated Vice Chairman by President Obama in 2014.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

As a commissioner, Pinkert participated in numerous anti-dumping, countervailing duty, and safeguard investigations, including the special safeguard investigation of passenger tires that resulted in import relief for the domestic tire industry and was upheld by the World Trade Organization. He participated in an unprecedented number of final determinations in Section 337 investigations during his tenure, notably dissenting in an electronic devices case that went to President for policy review. President Obama, relying on many of the factors cited in the dissent, overruled the commission for the first time since 1987.

Dean Pinkert

Former ITC Vice Chair A. Dean Pinkert. Source: Hughes Hubbard.

Pinkert spoke with MetalMiner Editor Jeff Yoders by phone about several issues facing metals producers and manufacturers, including global steel and aluminum overcapacity and how the new Trump administration can approach trade and overcapacity issues. This is part one of our discussion.

Jeff Yoders: Do you feel that the current tools being used to regulate trade are effective in dealing with global steel overcapacity? And global overcapacity for other metals?

Dean Pinkert: If you go back a year now, to the G20 decision to look at the overcapacity situation regarding steel, there has been a lot discussion, and there will be more, but, eventually, they will be able to figure out a way to proceed with a plan to reduce worldwide overcapacity. I just saw today that some of the aluminum interests around the world are looking to initiate that same type of process with regard to aluminum production.

That tells you that there’s a sense that there is progress being made on the steel side and the aluminum producers feel that they’re in a similar worldwide overcapacity issue and they want to see if that G20 process, intended to get the amount of product produced worldwide, down could be successful. Read more

Unlike the U.S., which has retained a paper $1 bill, the U.K. did away with the venerable pound sterling banknote in 1983, replacing it with a round dual-metal, £1 coin much to the disgust of traditionalists.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

Broadly speaking though, the £1 coin has been relatively successful in terms of longevity compared to the paper note. The former has lasted 40 years but the latter about nine months, but at a cost, the British one pound (£) coin has suffered from high levels of counterfeiting.

One pound coin

The new £1 coin, now with security features! Source: the Royal Mint.

There are thought to be more than 30 million fake £1 coins in circulation, adding up to 2.55% of coins according to a recent article in The Sun newspaper. The current pound coin is made up of 70% copper, 24.5% zinc and 5.5% nickel — weighing a mere 9.5 grams. The coin also has a diameter of 22.5 mm (7/8 inch) and a thickness of 3.15 mm (1/8 inch). The new pound coin is also constructed from two different colored metals like the old one, but the new version contains an iSIS security feature (a new high-security coinage currency system developed by The Royal Mint). Read more

I had the pleasure of attending the S&P Global Platts Steel Markets North America conference held recently in Chicago.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

The general outlook at the conference for steel markets in the year ahead was notably optimistic, although each of the initial speakers differed in who and/or what the audience should pay attention to in the coming months and years.

Conference keynote speaker, Herb Black, CEO of American Iron & Metal Company had his eyes on Turkey and its burgeoning scrap market. Timna Tanners, Managing Director of U.S. Metals and Mining at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, encouraged the audience to focus on China, while Beth Ann Bovino, Chief U.S. Economist for S&P Global Ratings, spoke to present macroeconomic conditions with a watchful eye on the current administration and potential post-election policy changes. Read more

A lighted underground tunnel in a nickel mine.

Nickel prices remained steady last week due to a lack of new fundamentals that would drive the commodity either up or down.

According to a recent report from the Economic Calendar, nickel traded on the London Metal Exchange at $10,210 to $10,115 a metric ton with support at $9,860/mt and resistance at $10,735/mt.

Want a short- and medium-term buying outlook for aluminum, copper, tin, lead, zinc, nickel and several forms of steel? Subscribe to our monthly buying outlook reports!

Leia Toovey, writing for the Economic Calendar, said “Nickel futures experienced upside earlier in the month when Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte threatened to stop all mining in the world’s biggest exporter of nickel. This comes after the Philippines suspended mining activities at numerous nickel mines found to be in violation of environmental regulations.”

Nickel Prices Break Even in Q1

Our own Raul de Frutos recently wrote extensively on the current state of the nickel market, and found that while most industrial metals will finish Q1 2017 on the upside, nickel is one exception.

de Frutos wrote: “The metal has traded up and down to finish the first quarter close to flat. Nickel prices are significantly higher than they were one year ago and traders are now finding little reason to be any more bullish than bearish due to a mix of news that helps both positions.”

He concluded that nickel is in dire need of new fundamental price drivers, positive or negative.

“With all of this uncertainty, industrial buyers might want to wait for new clues before making purchasing decisions,” he wrote.

How will nickel and base metals fare in 2017? You can find a more in-depth copper price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. For a short- and long-term buying strategy with specific price thresholds:

Did you honestly think it had gone away? In the week that the U.K. government is set to announce article 50, formally notify its European partners that it plans to leave the E.U. within two years, we’re reminded of the ongoing political process which is likely to add significant volatility in the year ahead.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

The U.K.’s (or at least Great Britain’s, Scotland is vowing to hold its own referendum on staying in the U.K.) decision to leave the E.U. will have far-reaching consequences but, realistically, does not look likely to signal a breakup of the E.U. itself. Recent elections in the Netherlands saw a swing back to liberal pro-E.U. political parties and a rejection of more xenophobic and anti-E.U. sentiments as espoused by Geert Wilders and his Party for Freedom. Although she is likely to do well in the first round, the Dutch result does not bode well for Marine Le Pen in the upcoming French elections with pro-E.U. parties doing well in the polls. The E.U., politically, is currently showing a united front particularly in its pre-negotiating stance with the U.K.

Clean Break? Or Regulatory Cooperation?

Britain, on the other hand, is waging what can the politely be called an internal debate between those who are lobbying for a hard Brexit or clean break from all E.U. laws and institutions, and those on the other side taking a more pragmatic view that it could be in Britain’s interest (if it genuinely wants some form of open access to E.U. markets) to maintain compliance with many E.U. regulations and institutions. Read more

Following the fortunes of Boeing and Airbus, you could be forgiven for thinking that aircraft manufacturers always run late, over budget, and the resulting end product can struggle to meet initial expectations.

Emrbaer E2

The Embraer E2. Source: Embraer.

But Brazil’s Embraer, the world’s third-largest commercial jet maker, has shown with its next generation narrow body regional aircraft, the E-2 series, that it doesn’t have to be that way. Embraer introduced the aircraft at the Paris Airshow in 2013 and it was first displayed last summer at the Farnborough Airshow just 45 days after its maiden flight. The aircraft is set to be delivered on time, on budget, and even slightly underweight.

Segment Dominance

Embraer has been very successful with their current E-jet series and the new E-2 program looks set to maintain the company’s 55% market share dominance of the regional jet market. The E-2 will commence deliveries in the first half of 2018 and variants will be capable of carrying between 70 and 130 passengers. An FT article notes that Embraer has a backlog of commitments from airlines for 690 E2 aircraft, including firm orders of 275.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

The company has struck a wide-ranging and exclusive arrangement with Alcoa Corp. for aluminum sheet and plate for the wings, skins and fuselages of the model, with other Alcoa products being used in key applications such as wing ribs, fuselage frames and other structural parts. The long-term collaboration is said by Aluminum Today to be worth $470 million to Alcoa. “PurePower” engines will be supplied by Pratt & Whitney. Read more

This part two of our sit down with Steel Manufacturers Association President Philip K. Bell at the recent S&P Global Platts Steel Markets North America conference here in Chicago. Bell currently serves on the Department of Commerce International Trade Advisory Committee on Steel (ITAC 12), advising the Secretary of Commerce and United States Trade Representative on trade policy, trade agreements, and other trade related matters that benefit U.S. businesses, workers, and the economy.

Jeff Yoders: You mentioned that the proposed border-adjustment tax is something you have to be very, very careful about.

Philip K. Bell: Ironically, when I look at things the administration should prioritize, I would really like to see infrastructure rise higher on that top five list as opposed to things like a healthcare repeal because that’s one clear way that you can jump start the steel industry.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

Philip K. Bell

Philip K. Bell. Source: SMA

The steel industry, to me, if you look at it in the simplest terms, is based on cost and demand. You can help lower steel producers’ costs by reducing taxes and regulatory burdens, but you can increase demand by having this $1 trillion infrastructure plan and that would be very important. Making sure you deal with countries that dump, subsidize exports, etc. would also help.

JY: Using countervailing duties, anti-dumping duties and the existing tools commerce has, right?

PB: Right.

JY: I asked Chad Utermark, executive vice president of Nucor, what, exactly, their representatives had heard about when we might get to see the ideas for an infrastructure bill precisely because of that. This seems like a slam dunk for economic growth for all the industries that support construction. Why isn’t it being pushed more?

PB: We certainly would like to see infrastructure investment made a higher priority. I love the idea of public-private partnerships. The P3 approach is good, you’re going to bring better managerial skill with people who can manage the entire supply chain of infrastructure investment. Keep in mind, infrastructure can be financed this way, but it also needs to be funded (to an extent by the government). There are some infrastructure projects that are very important but might not appeal to private investors. They might not be easy to get done. Read more

We had a chance to sit down and discuss the issues facing members of the Steel Manufacturers Association with SMA President Philip K. Bell at the recent S&P Global Platts Steel Markets North America conference here in Chicago. Bell also currently serves on the  Department of Commerce International Trade Advisory Committee on Steel (ITAC 12), advising the Secretary of Commerce and United States Trade Representative on trade policy, trade agreements, and other trade related matters that benefit U.S. businesses, workers, and the economy.

Philip K. Bell

Philip K. Bell. Source: SMA

Jeff Yoders: We’ve heard a lot about North American Free Trade Agreement and what changes to it might mean in the last two days. How do your members feel about reopening NAFTA to changes?

Philip K. Bell: NAFTA is over 20 years old and it’s probably time to look at it again. A lot has changed over the last two decades. We hope the approach that the administration takes is one that’s more methodical and takes into account that not only are Canada and Mexico two of our biggest trade partners but, when it comes to the steel industry, they ARE our two largest trade partners.

There is a lot of integration in this area. You have a lot of steel producers that either have businesses in Mexico such as Gerdau, ArcelorMittal and Nucor — through its joint venture JFE — and you have a lot of companies that want to do business there like Steel Dynamics which is hoping to increase its presence in that market by importing flat-rolled into Mexico. Read more

The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries in general, and Saudi Arabia in particular, have done the U.S. oil industry a massive favor, and they are probably ruing the day they tried to squeeze America’s shale industry out of existence.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

The collapse in oil prices that ensued after Saudi Arabia-led OPEC opened the spigots two years ago forced American companies, and their many subcontractors, to innovate in a way that would never have happened so fast or gone so far without the imminent threat of survival forcing the pace.

Oil Prices Allow Reopening of Old Wells

Now, U.S. shale producers have achieved economies of scale that allow them to return to previously closed wells in fields like Eagle Ford and achieve 30% returns even at $40 a barrel. U.S. explorers may be making hay in the domestic market, but huge potential exists for these same firms to take their technology abroad. Read more

The head of an Indian zinc company is using the surge in metal prices to the financial benefit of his shareholders in a major way.

According to a recent piece from Bloomberg, Anil Agarwal, the billionaire head of Hindustan Zinc Ltd., is parlaying metal price increases into a $4 billion dividend for shareholders in what is being called a record return for the company.

Want a short- and medium-term buying outlook for aluminum, copper, tin, lead, zinc, nickel and several forms of steel? Subscribe to our monthly buying outlook reports!

The closest beneficiaries include Vedanta Ltd. (65% ownership) and the Indian government (30% ownership), Bloomberg stated. Hindustan Zinc is the largest zinc producer in India.

“Vedanta continues to be in a very good space given all its verticals are doing well and if they can reduce debt that would be a better ploy and would increase the returns for shareholders,” Sanjiv Bhasin, executive vice president at India Infoline Ltd., told the news source by phone. “Metals, as a proxy to global growth and given the stimulus announced in the U.S., have been the best asset class in the past one year, and it will continue to outperform.”

Zinc Price Rally Amps Up

Our own Raul de Frutos wrote earlier this week that zinc prices climbed the week prior and the metal is now trading near the milestone of $3,000 per metric ton, which is the last time prices have been at this point since September 2007.

de Frutos wrote: “Zinc has doubled in price since it hit bottom in January of last year. As prices climbed, many buyers probably made the mistake of thinking prices were too high, missing this spectacular rally. However, buyers that subscribe to our monthly outlook, didn’t miss this rally. We recommended buying forward starting in April of 2016. Ever since, prices have risen without looking back.”

How will zinc and base metals fare in 2017? You can find a more in-depth copper price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. For a short- and long-term buying strategy with specific price thresholds: