China MES

A report released recently concludes that treating China as a market economy in anti-dumping investigations would “severely damage the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) steel industries and harm NAFTA economies.”

Free Sample Report: Our Annual Metal Buying Outlook

The study, composed of three economic analyses, was conducted by leading economists from Capital Trade Incorporated in Washington, DC;  the Centre for Spatial Economics in Ontario, Canada; and IMCO in Mexico City, Mexico.

Six steel industry groups — the American Iron and Steel Institute, the Steel Manufacturers Association, the Canadian Steel Producers Association, CANACERO, the Specialty Steel Industry of North America and the Committee on Pipe and Tube Imports — sponsored the report. They issued the following statement:

“China is a state-run economy and does not operate on market principles, yet it argues that it must be treated as a market economy as of the 15th anniversary of its accession to the WTO in December 2016. This third-party report found that granting China market economy status is premature and would lead to significant job losses in our sector, and in steel communities where plants are being idled and jobs are already being decimated. This is unacceptable.”

Read more

Arguably, no issue has impacted the steel industry more than imports.

Free Sample Report: Our Annual Metal Buying Outlook

With multiple trade cases filed in 2015, service centers reeling with higher than average months-on-hand inventory levels (at prices that exceed the current market), US producers operating at 71.3% capacity utilization, the last thing the industry needs to hear is China somehow ascending to the World Trade Organization with full “market economy” status.

Nobody Thinks China Operates a Market Economy

According to a new report issued by trade specialist law firm Wiley Rein entitled, The Treatment of China as a Non-Market Economy Country After 2016 discusses what changes in market status China should expect to receive after 1 provision in the original negotiated WTO agreement expires on December 11, 2016.

China’s Protocol of Accession (to the WTO as a full member) requires that China and more specifically, its government, not meddle, “…its control over prices of key inputs to many manufactured products.”

Read more