• heroanimated-mm

    October Report Out!

    Grab our October forecast & market commentary report to help you buy smarter this fall.

    Get A Sample Now >

The Automotive MMI fell again in October, inching down 1.4% from its previous all-time low of 73.

Free Sample Report: Our Monthly Metal Buying Outlook

It’s more of the same for an automotive metals market that, while strong on both the supply and demand sides here in the US, is being dragged down by falling demand in other large markets. Automotive specialty metals have been cited as the savior and the future demand driver for many a steel or aluminum company in this bear market.

Automotive_Chart_October-2015_FNLGerdau is practically staking its entire Indian business on it. Aerospace and automotive are also regularly cited as the growth markets for stainless and aluminum overseas, too. The aluminum-bodied Ford F-150 continues to be the darling of the US automotive market with its lighter corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) load and its Denis Leary commercials about “military-grade” aluminum. Even the Super Duty is getting in on aluminum. The emerging markets were on the aluminum train before Ford was, too, and that trend is only growing.

US, European Auto Sales

So, what gives?

In September, US vehicle sales topped a SAAR (seasonally adjusted annual rate) of 18 million vehicles. Leading automakers reported the healthy year-over-year increase in sales number thanks, in part, to big gains over the Labor Day holiday weekend.

It wasn’t just us yanks buying cars constructed cold from specialty metals, either. The Czech Republic will report its highest car sales ever this year. The Volkswagen scandal might be hurting platinum prices but it’s clearly not denting overall vehicle sales, even in Europe where the scandal hits close to home with more diesel cars on the road.

VW has a market share of around 48% in the Czech Republic, a country of roughly 10.5 million people, with the company’s domestic maker Skoda Auto the top seller.

Chinese Demand Collapses

The fly in the automotive metals ointment is demand in China. Like steel, aluminum and other markets, the economic collapse in China has eroded what was once healthy automotive – and automotive metal – demand there.

The urbanization that economists counted on to fuel more Chinese car purchases went away with housing demand there, as well as the un-manipulated renminbi. Beijing is looking entirely to exports now (hence the purposeful devaluation) to pull its economy out of the doldrums, and isn’t even trying to goose those domestic markets much.

Free Download: Latest Metal Price Trends in the MMI Report

Sad to say, but no matter how strong the US or European automotive markets are, they can’t make up for the loss of Chinese demand, which numbers sales (and people) in the neighborhood of a billion. That’s one of the reasons so many steel companies are looking to India, with its large population, to make up for that demand. The problem there is India’s urbanization isn’t as far along as China’s was. Still, automakers and steel companies such as Gerdau are digging in there for the long haul. Here’s to hoping it’s not as long as some predict.

For this month’s key exact prices and trends, log in or sign up to be a MetalMiner member below!

For full access to this MetalMiner membership content:
Log In |
{Comments Off on Automotive MMI Dips Again, Sales Can’t Dent Low Steel, Aluminum Prices}

The monthly Aluminum MMI® registered a value of 76 in October, a decrease of 1.3% from 77 in September.

Free Sample Report: Our Monthly Metal Buying Outlook

Aluminum prices were more stable in September, only falling slightly from the previous month. This price stabilization is normal after 4 consecutive months of declines. Upside momentum is still lacking and it seems like the bears are firmly in control of this market. The aluminum trend keeps pointing down with no sign of a turnaround.

Aluminum_Chart_October-2015_FNLChina is Still Overproducing

The Aluminum Association expressed strong concern when the China Non-Ferrous Metal Industry Association (CNIA) called for the removal of a longstanding 15% tax on exported primary aluminum. This would increase the margins of Chinese exporters, potentially exporting more aluminum to international markets. Even with the tax in place, some in the US believe that aluminum producers in China are illegally mislabeling extruded products as semi-finished to avoid exports on billet.

Aluminum exports are up 22% on the year-to-date. Exports dropped over the past 2 months but production still looks high in China, so the drop in exports likely relates more to weaker global demand. Some analysts are waiting for a rebound in exports when final reports from last month come out.

Another interesting highlight of September was that Alcoa, Inc. will split itself into 2 companies. The firm has found that its legacy smelting business, the company’s vertically integrated structure, is not the advantage it once was.

One half retains the Alcoa name and comprises the legacy business of bauxite mining, alumina production and primary aluminum smelting. The second half of the business, or the “value add” business, is yet to be named, although it’s believed to include much of Alcoa’s specialty aluminum business and recent acquisitions such as titanium fabricator RTI.

Free Download: Compare With Last Month’s MMI Report

Two months ago we mentioned the slide in Alcoa shares. Even though the company made good acquisitions and investment in downstream value-added activities, its stock couldn’t buck the falling trend in aluminum prices. On top of that, premiums fell in September below $0.07/lb for the first time since January 2012, hurting the margins of Alcoa and the rest of the US aluminum producers.

For key exact aluminum price drivers and trends, log in or sign up below!

For full access to this MetalMiner membership content:
Log In |
{Comments Off on Aluminum MMI Slightly Down, The Bears Are Still in Control}