This Morning in Metals: Canadian Steel Industry Can Breath ‘Sigh of Relief’

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This morning in metals news, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the Canadian steel industry can breath a sigh of relief after obtaining an exemption from the U.S.’s recently announced 25% steel tariff, the tariffs throw a wrench into India’s export plans and Reuters’ Andy Home opines on the way forward for the aluminum market in a post-U.S.-tariff world.

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Canadian Steel Industry Enjoys Tariff Exemption (For Now)

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said members of the Canadian steel industry can breath a sigh of relief, CNN reported.

North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) partners Canada and Mexico received temporary exemptions from the U.S.’s forthcoming tariffs of 25% and 10% on steel and aluminum imports, respectively. However, the key word is “temporary,” particularly as NAFTA renegotiation efforts continue and the U.S. hopes to win concessions from its NAFTA peers.

In an interview Monday with CNN’s Anderson Cooper, Trudeau addressed the notion that the temporary exemption would serve as a bargaining chip for the U.S. in the NAFTA talks.

“We’ll just respond the way we have, with focus on the work we do together and not too much worry about the rhetoric,” Trudeau told Cooper.

India’s Export Ambitions Complicated by Tariffs

Steel Minister Chaudhary Birender Singh said the U.S. tariff on steel could disrupt India’s efforts to become a major steel exporter, Reuters reported.

India expects a loss of $130 million due to the U.S. import tariffs, according to a note prepared by the steel ministry, Reuters reported.

What’s Next for the Aluminum Market?

Canada, Mexico and Australia have secured exemptions of some form from the U.S.’s announced tariffs, and other countries and trading blocs (namely the European Union) are lobbying for exemptions of their own.

So, given the climate of negotiations, both economic and inherently political in nature, what does that mean for the global aluminum market going forward?

Thus far, the LME price hasn’t changed much, Reuters’ Andy Home wrote, while the CME Midwest Premium has nearly doubled since the beginning of the year.

On a production level, already announced and forthcoming capacity restarts in the U.S. will inch the capacity utilization rate closer to the previously announced goal of 80%.

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The tariff, of course, will lead to a rise in costs for consumers. As Home writes, the beverage industry and can makers will seek exemptions on the grounds that domestic production won’t be able to meet their demand, while also arguing that imported aluminum for their purposes doesn’t constitute a national security threat.

Comment (1)

  1. Nguyen Phuc says:

    With Trump’s impulsiveness, “sigh of relief” can not last long. With this tariff, competition is definitely higher than before.

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