Articles in Category: Anti-Dumping

Thyssenkrupp and Tata Steel have finally made it to the altar.

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After 18 months of mostly behind-the-scenes negotiations to resolve several potentially “deal-off” stumbling blocks, all the major issues have been resolved. The two firms have signed a memorandum of understanding to create a 50:50 joint venture based in Amsterdam, Netherlands, called Thyssenkrupp Tata Steel (TTS).

The behemoth will rank second to ArcelorMittal with 21 million tons of annual steel capacity generating sales of €15 billion ($17.8 billion) and employing 48,000 people, The Telegraph reported.

New Focus

TTS will focus on three main production hubs: Ijmuiden in the Netherlands, Duisburg in Germany and Port Talbot in South Wales, the paper reports, Analysts say improved viability will come from cost savings of between €400 million and €600 million a year arising after 2,000 redundancies and another 2,000 jobs going out of the combined business as overlapping operations are removed.

Not surprisingly, TTS sees the value proposition as the enhanced opportunity for the combined group to move its business up the value chain in cooperation rather than competition with each other.

Hans Fischer, Tata Steel Europe’s chief executive, said “We need to focus on higher value products, China has huge overcapacity and there is a risk they will flood the market. The answer is not to compete with them, but try but find a solution where we have products that cannot be produced easily. We need to be a technology leader.”

Tata wriggling out of the old British Steel Pension fund liabilities was the final major hurdle to overcome — albeit to be fair, at considerable cost to the parent — and the willingness of British workers to agree to an end to the final salary scheme and reduced benefits for existing members underlines their desperation for a deal, matched by compromises made in Germany by workers fearful of the prospects of foreign competition with the European steel industry.

But therein lies the dilemma.

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After a required five-year review, existing antidumping duty orders on carbon and alloy seamless standard, line, and pressure pipe (CASSLP) from Japan and Romania were kept in place after a vote Tuesday by the U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC).

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According to the Uruguay Round Agreements Act, the Department of Commerce must revoke an antidumping or countervailing duty order, or terminate a suspension agreement, after five years unless the Department of Commerce and the USITC determine that “revoking the order or terminating the suspension agreement would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of dumping or subsidies and of material injury USITC within a reasonably foreseeable time.”

According to a USITC release, Chairman Rhonda K. Schmidtlein, Vice Chairman David S. Johanson, and Commissioner Irving A. Williamson voted in the affirmative. Commissioner Meredith M. Broadbent voted in the affirmative with respect to Japan and in the negative with respect to Romania.

The five-year sunset reviews in the case — Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe from Japan and Romania — were instituted Sept. 1, 2016.

The determination came on a third review of the orders. The second review of the orders led to a continuation of them as of Oct. 11, 2o11, for both Japanese and Romanian imports of the products.

According to the USITC’s posted notice explaining its determination to conduct full reviews for CASSLP imports from each country, it noted that it received a joint response filed on behalf of Vallourec Star, LP and U.S. Steel, domestic producers of CASSLP.

“Because these producers accounted for a substantial majority of domestic production of CASSLP pipe in 2015, the Commission determined that the domestic interested party group response was adequate,” the explanation noted.

Although the Commission did not receive a response from any interested parties in Japan, it received a joint response filed by S.C. Silcotub S.A., a Romanian producer of CASSLP pipe, and Tenaris Global Services (U.S.A.) Corporation, an affiliated U.S. importer of subject merchandise from Romania, the explanatory document said.

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The Commission’s public report containing information on the reviews will be available by Oct. 31 and can be accessed, once available, at http://pubapps.usitc.gov/applications/publogs/qry_publication_loglist.asp.

In another five-year sunset review, the Commission voted Sept. 14 to keep in place existing antidumping duty orders on steel nails from the United Arab Emirates.

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The U.S. Department of Commerce has been busy this year.

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The department added another investigation to its agenda, announcing late last week that it had launched antidumping and countervailing duty investigations into titanium sponge imports from Japan and Kazakhstan.

“The Department of Commerce intends to act swiftly to halt any unfair trade practices and will render our decisions at the earliest opportunity, while also assuring a full and fair assessment of the facts,” Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross said in a release. “The U.S. market is the most open in the world, but we must take action to ensure U.S. businesses and workers are treated fairly.”

The new investigation marked the 65th new antidumping or countervailing duty probe of the year by the Department of Commerce. Through Sept. 14, the number of new investigations has increased by 45% compared with the same time frame last year, according to the Department of Commerce release.

The case comes on the heels of petitions filed by Titanium Metals Corporation (TIMET) on Aug. 24.

The investigations will seek to determine whether titanium sponge from Japan and Kazakhstan is being sold at less than fair value, as well as if the imports from Kazakhstan are receiving countervailable government subsidies.

Imports of titanium sponge from Japan and Kazakhstan were valued at an estimated $144.8 million and $374,000, respectively, according to the Department of Commerce.

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The U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) will make a preliminary determination in the cases on or before Oct. 10. Assuming the ITC determines there is a reasonable indication that imports of the product threaten the domestic industry, the Department of Commerce will then issue a preliminary determination in the countervailing duty case by Nov. 17, 2017, and the antidumping cases by Jan. 31, 2018.

TIMET, based in Exton, Pennsylvania, supplies nearly a fifth of the world’s titanium, and has production facilities in both the U.S. and Europe, according to its website.

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Before we head into the weekend, let’s look back at some of the top stories on MetalMiner this week.

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Earlier this month, the U.S. Department of Commerce issued a preliminary determination on Chinese aluminum foil — one that could have a major impact on Chinese aluminum foil producers.

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On Aug. 8, Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced that Chinese aluminum foil has benefited unfairly from government subsidies ranging from 16.56 to 80.97%.

“The United States is committed to free, fair and reciprocal trade, and will continue to validate the information provided to us that brought us to this decision,” Ross said in a release. “The Trump Administration will not stand idly by as harmful trade practices from foreign nations attempt to take advantage of our essential industries, workers, and businesses.”

Well, China’s Ministry of Commerce had a response of its own last week.

Wang Hejun, director of the Ministry of Commerce’s Trade Remedy and Investigation Bureau, questioned the ruling, citing the Chinese government’s cooperation, according to a release on the Ministry of Commerce’s website.

The release also states Hejun said China urges the U.S. to act “prudently” to avoid negative impacts bad influence on the economic and trade relationship between the U.S. and China.

According to Reuters, the Ministry of Commerce posted a statement on its Wechat account, in which Hejun said the United States rebuffed the Chinese government’s offers to cooperate with the investigation before making its ruling.

The Department of Commerce’s Aug. 8 ruling was only a preliminary determination. However, at the conclusion of the countervailing duty investigation, duties of approximately 81% could be slapped onto Chinese foil imports.

According to the Department of Commerce release, barring any delays it is expected to announce its final determination on Oct. 24.

In 2016, imports of aluminum foil from China were valued at an estimated $389 million, according to the Department of Commerce.

The aluminum foil countervailing duty investigation is one of 64 initiated from Jan. 20 to Aug. 8 — a 40% increase from the same time period last year, according to the Department of Commerce.

In other aluminum investigations, the Department of Commerce’s Section 232 investigation of aluminum imports is still pending. The investigation was launched April 17 (along with a 232 investigation of steel imports). Although those investigations do not specifically target China, much of the discussion from the administration and those within the domestic steel and aluminum industries has focused on China and excess capacity. Other nations, however, including the European Union bloc, have expressed concern about the impact of Section 232 actions and their effects.

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According to Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act, Ross has 270 days to present the president with a report outlining recommendations, which makes for January deadlines for the aluminum and steel cases.

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India’s protectionist measures to safeguard its steel industry seem to be paying off.

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As reported consistently by AG Metal Miner, the Indian government, responding to the call of its steelmakers, had time and again imposed various forms of anti-dumping measures and fines to stop cheap imports of steel — especially from the world’s steel manufacturing leader, China.

Along with the U.S. and Brazil, India was said to be one of the world’s leading initiators of anti-dumping investigations, according to the World Trade Organization (WTO).

Well, now, all this has resulted in India’s steel exports doubling to 8.2 million tons and imports have been slashed by about one-third in 2016-17.

As per a report by the Press Trust of India (PTI), quoting from portions of the released Economic Survey, the rise in exports of steel could also wipe away the excess capacity built up in the steel sector. The mid-year survey by the government said steel imports had declined in 2016-17, while exports of steel had doubled.

Alloy imports dipped by 36.6% to 7.4 million tons in 2016- 17 against 11.7 million tons in the previous fiscal year. Exports doubled to 8.2 million tons last fiscal year, over 4.1 million tons in the corresponding year.

The news was welcomed by steel companies like Tata Steel. T.V. Narendran, managing director for Tata Steel India and South East Asia, told newsmen that steel demand in India was increasing, making it just right to make future investments. Stability was being witnessed in the steel sector globally, though it had faced some problem two years ago, Narendran told reporters.

Ironically, much of Indian steel joy stems from its traditional rival China, where there’s been a visible improvement in the economy — which meant much of its steel being produced was once again being used within the country. It was against the backdrop of China’s economic slowdown that the global steel industry had faced distress due to decline in global demand.

The Indian survey report said, in response to the dumping of cheap imports, the government in 2016 introduced a host of measures like raising Basic Customs Duty, imposition of Minimum Import Price (MIP) and anti-dumping duties in order to shield domestic producers. The government imposed the MIP for steel in February 2016 for a period of one year.

On April 12, 2016, India initiated countervailing duty investigation concerning imports of certain hot-rolled and cold-rolled stainless steel flat products originating in China.

According to the WTO, India’s share in total global steel exports increased from 1.1% in 2000 to 2.8% in 2016. During this period, China’s share in total steel exports rose from 3.7% in 2000 to 19.2% in 2016. Japan’s share in total steel exports in 2000 which was 12.2%, but fell to 9.1% in 2016.

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Meanwhile, the U.S. share in total steel imports was 17.0% in 2000, but has since come down to 12.1% in 2016.

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This afternoon in metals news, supply-side reform in China is having significant effects on global markets, U.S. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer calls for trade action to combat cheap imports of steel and aluminum from China and other countries, and scientists have resolved a long-standing mystery about a prehistoric copper smelting event.

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Chinese Supply-Side Reforms Leave Their Mark

There are many who question the impact of China’s efforts to curtail excess production, but according to a report by Platts, supply-side reforms in the country are having major impacts around the world.

China’s net steel exports through the first seven months of the year were down almost a third, according to the report. Hot rolled coil prices have also risen in the process, reaching their highest point since 2013.

“Given the current protectionist bent that seems to span the globe, it will be interesting to see how China’s metal exports will be perceived in a few years’ time,” the Platts report concludes. “In the US, for example, there is not enough steel capacity to deliver upon the infra-build being promised by President Trump, should Section 232 be imposed, and the build go ahead.”

Schumer Calls for Action on Cheap Steel, Aluminum Imports

The Trump administration launched Section 232 investigations into imports of steel and aluminum, with a particular focus on China.

On Tuesday, U.S. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, a Democrat, sounded a similar note, according to a report in the Watertown Daily Times.

“There are top notch manufactures like Alcoa and Nucor ready to provide high-quality aluminum and steel to businesses in and around the country, but China’s overproduction has resulted in a substantial threat to Upstate New York’s metal industry by making it almost impossible for companies that play by the rules to compete,” Schumer said in a statement.

According to the report, Schumer has sent letters to Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross and United States Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer on the matter.

Scientists Resolve Ancient Copper Smelting Mystery

For more than half a century, the origins of a copper smelting event at a prehistoric archaeological site has remained a mystery.

But recently, a team of scientists hit paydirt at the Late Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük in central Turkey.

“Scholars have been hotly debating the origins and spread of metallurgy for decades, mainly due to the relationship this technology had with the rise of social complexity and economy of the world’s first civilisations in the Near East,” according to a report in phys.org.

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According to the report, a study published Tuesday in the Journal of Archaeological Science concludes that that after “the re-examination of a c. 8,500-year-old by-product from metal smelting, or ‘slag’, from the site of Çatalhöyük presents the conclusive reconstruction of events that led to the firing of a small handful of green copper minerals.”

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This morning in metals news, the U.S. aluminum industry expressed support for the U.S. Department of Commerce’s ruling that Chinese aluminum foil is benefiting from government subsidies, Indian steel company Tata Steel is expected to detach its U.K. pension scheme from its business and, in consumer products news, a recent report says copper cocktail mugs may be causing food poisoning.

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DOC Rules Chinese Aluminum Foil Benefits From Government Subsidies

The U.S. aluminum industry came out in support of a U.S. Department of Commerce ruling Tuesday, which said that Chinese aluminum foil was benefiting from government subsidies.

According to the preliminary determination of the countervailing duty investigation, Chinese exporters of aluminum foil received countervailing subsidies 16.56 to 80.97%, Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced Tuesday.

Per a DOC release, the Commerce Department “will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect cash deposits from importers of aluminum foil from China based on these preliminary rates.”

“The United States is committed to free, fair and reciprocal trade, and will continue to validate the information provided to us that brought us to this decision,” Ross said. “The Trump Administration will not stand idly by as harmful trade practices from foreign nations attempt to take advantage of our essential industries, workers, and businesses.”

Per the release, imports of aluminum foil from China last year were valued at an estimated $389 million.

The Aluminum Association applauded the DOC determination.

“The association and its foil-producing members are very pleased with the Commerce Department’s finding and we greatly appreciate Secretary Ross’s leadership in enforcing U.S. trade laws to combat unfair practices,” said Heidi Brock, President and CEO of the Aluminum Association, in a prepared statement. “This is an important step to begin restoring a level playing field for U.S. aluminum foil production, an industry that supports more than 20,000 direct, indirect, and induced American jobs, and accounts for $6.8 billion in economic activity.

“U.S. aluminum foil producers are among the most competitive producers in the world, but they cannot compete against products that are subsidized by the Chinese government and sold at unfairly low prices.”

The ruling stems from the March 9 filing of antidumping and countervailing duty petitions by The Aluminum Association’s Trade Enforcement Working Group. The petition marked the first time the Aluminum Association has filed unfair trade cases on behalf of its members in its nearly 85-year history, according to the Aluminum Association release.

Tata Steel Inches Closer to Potential Merger

According to a BBC report, an announcement from Tata Steel regarding the separation of its British pension scheme from its businesses could be coming within days.

The pension scheme has been a “significant barrier” in merger talks between Tata and German steel producer ThyssenKrupp, according to the report.

According to the BBC, Tata “has been in negotiations with pension regulators and trustees” of the £15 billion British Steel Pension Scheme.

Health Officials Say Copper Cocktail Mugs Could Cause Food Poisoning

A recent report might give drinkers of Moscow Mules pause.

CBS News reported health officials in Iowa made the declaration that copper cocktail mugs — often used to drink the popular Moscow Mule cocktail — might cause food poisoning “after examining the poisonous nature of copper and copper alloys mixing with food.”

Per an advisory bulletin from Iowa’s Alcoholic Beverages Division, the federal Food and Drug Administration’s Model Food Code prohibits copper from coming into direct contact with foods that have a pH below 6.0 — for example, vinegar, fruit juice or wine.

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The Moscow Mule, an increasingly popular cocktail, includes lime juice.

The U.S. Department of Commerce. qingwa/Adobe Stock

This morning in metals news, the still-pending Section 232 investigations into steel and aluminum imports, raw steel production is up 2.7% in the U.S. year-over-year and aluminum has reached its highest point in 2.5 years.

Uncertainty Growing in Aluminum Market

It’s not exactly surprising that some in the aluminum and steel industries are feeling anxious about the Section 232 investigations, still unresolved, initiated by the Trump administration in April.

According to a report in Platts, that’s exactly how some are feeling on the aluminum side. Not only that, the uncertainty is making what was already considered a volatile aluminum market even more volatile.

Another potential consequence of the investigation? The cost of downstream products could go up, according to industry sources cited by Platts.

Raw Steel Production Down From Previous Week, Up For the Year

The American Iron and Steel Institute released its weekly raw steel production data on Monday, and the numbers are both up and down.

For the week ending Aug. 5, production was down 0.4% from the previous week ending July 29. Production for the week ending Aug. 5 amounted to 1,762,000 tons.

Production for the year to date, however, was up 2.7%, with 53,870,000 tons produced through Aug. 5 this year.

Aluminum Heats Up

The durable metal reached a 2.5-year high Tuesday on news of Chinese supply cuts and signs of strong Chinese demand, Reuters reported.

According to the report, 3.21 million tons of production will be shut down in China’s Shandong province.

LME aluminum eclipsed the $2,000/ton mark on Tuesday, reaching as high as $2,007 — the highest since December 2014, according to Reuters.

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Anxiety is rising among Europe’s steelmakers that a potential U.S. plan to levy steel tariffs, on national security grounds, could have a disastrous impact on the region’s sales into the market.

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Reuters reported that the European steel association Eurofer is worried that “….measures potentially stemming from the U.S. section 232 investigation may lead to a proliferation of disastrous global trade flow distortions.”

Eurofer is worried on two counts. First, it is worried that with China largely already cut out of the U.S. market by anti-dumping legislation, the axe will fall on imports from other regions, of which Europe is a major supplier. Many European countries are already experiencing steep declines in sales to the U.S. between 2015 and 2016 — in some cases of 50% — but the largest, Germany, remains the fifth-largest external supplier to the U.S. of flat-rolled products, according to International Trade Administration data.

The second worry is that should the investigation support bans or large duties, suppliers in the affected countries will look for alternative mature, high-value markets for their products, namely the EU. This would potentially flood an already overcrowded market with more low-priced material.

Having championed free trade in recent statements, Europe may have to eat its own words if it is forced to find ways to counter such a flood. Reuters reports that moves are already afoot, at the G20 summit in Germany last weekend, leaders from the world’s 20 leading economies set an August deadline for an OECD-led global forum to compile information about steel overcapacity. That also includes a report on potential solutions, due in November, which could result in the region acting of its own.

In reality, Europe may not be the primary target of the president’s 232 action. Supplies from Canada, Brazil, Mexico, South Korea, Japan and Russia dwarf those from Europe, but that will not necessarily stop the region from suffering considerable collateral damage.

The move would come at an unfortunate time for the European steel industry.

After prices rose nearly 50% last year, they have since fallen back some 10% this year, according to Reuters. Demand, however, is recovering with a 1.9% rise forecast for this year, according to Eurofer, suggesting prices could stabilize (although demand growth is expected to ease again next year, with only 1% growth forecast).

EU Strikes Back?

However, The Guardian reports Europe is also looking at retaliatory measures, should they suffer exclusion or tariffs because of the 232 action. The paper quotes the European Commission president, Jean-Claude Juncker, who is reported to have said that if the U.S. took measures against Germany and China’s steel industries, the EU would “react with counter-measures.”

The article says one industry in the Europeans’ crosshairs is Kentucky bourbon, worth $166 million to the state last year and directly employing some 17,500.

Kentucky was staunchly supportive of Trump during his campaign, with 62.5% of the electorate voting for him.

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“I am telling you this in the hope that all of this won’t be necessary,” Juncker said during the G20 summit. “But we are in an elevated battle mood.”

Bellicose talk, indeed.