Articles in Category: Anti-Dumping

list of commodities prices, including copper price, silver price, oil price and gold price

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Before we head into the weekend, let’s take a look back at the week that was and some of the metals storylines here on MetalMiner, including coverage of the copper price, how the Biden administration will handle the former Trump administration’s metals tariffs and much more.

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Week of Feb. 22-26 (copper price, aluminum tariff and much more)

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aluminum foil

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The US Department of Commerce this week announced final margins for anti-dumping and countervailing duties on aluminum foil from China.

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DOC calculates AD, CVD margins for aluminum foil

According to the Aluminum Association, the Department of Commerce announced anti-dumping and countervailing duty margins “in connection with the first annual administrative review of the unfair trade orders on certain aluminum foil.”

In its analysis, the DOC used sales information for Jiangsu Zhongji Lamination Materials Co., Ltd. and Xiamen Xiashun Aluminum Foil Co., Ltd. 

“The Aluminum Association and its members are pleased that the Commerce Department continues to enforce vigorously the anti-dumping and countervailing duty orders on aluminum foil from China,” said Tom Dobbins, president and CEO of the Aluminum Association.

Dobbins said the unfair trade orders are “leveling the playing field.”

However, he also said it is “discouraging” that Chinese producers are exporting foil using unfair trade practices.

“Today’s announcement reinforces the need for continued vigilance to ensure that foil imports from China are competing fairly in the U.S. market,” he added.

The Department of Commerce calculated a combined anti-dumping and countervailing duty rate of 71.98% for Jiangsu Zhongji Lamination Materials.

Meanwhile, the DOC calculated a combined rate of 67.45% for Xiamen Xiashun Aluminum Foil Co.

The duties also apply to “other cooperative respondents” whose shipments the DOC did not analyze individually.

The calculations cover aluminum foil that came into the United States between Aug. 14, 2017 and March 31, 2019.

“The unfair trade orders on aluminum foil from China continue to be effective in ensuring fair competition with imports from China,” said John M. Herrmann, lead counsel to the domestic industry. “We will continue our efforts to ensure the effectiveness of these unfair trade orders, including aggressive efforts to identify and thwart schemes to evade enforcement of the orders.”

Other investigations

Meanwhile, the Department of Commerce late last year launched investigations related to aluminum foil imports from five other countries.

The DOC in October launched probes related to imports from Armenia, Brazi, Oman, Russia and Turkey.

The period of investigation runs from July 1, 2019, to June 30, 2020.

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antidumping duty

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The United States International Trade Commission (USITC) last week voted to maintain antidumping duties on non-oriented electrical steel.

The MetalMiner 2021 Annual Outlook consolidates our 12-month view and provides buying organizations with a complete understanding of the fundamental factors driving prices and a detailed forecast that can be used when sourcing metals for 2021 — including expected average prices, support and resistance levels.

USITC rules in five-year sunset review on antidumping duties

The USITC conducted a five-year sunset review of antidumping duties on non-oriented electrical steel (NOES). The review covered imports from China, Germany, Japan, Korea, Sweden and Taiwan.

Manufacturers use NOES in such applications as electric generators and motors.

Last week, the USITC said revoking the duties would likely result in “continuation or recurrence of material injury.”

Furthermore, the UISTC opted to maintain existing countervailing duties on imports from China and Taiwan.

Per the Uruguay Round Agreements Act, the Department of Commerce must revoke an antidumping duty or countervailing duty order after five years unless doing so would lead to “continuation or recurrence of dumping or subsidies” and “of material injury … within a reasonably foreseeable time.”

The USITC initiated the review process Nov. 1, 2019.

However, the initial investigation began in 2013 after AK Steel filed petitions with the Department of Commerce and USITC.

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aluminum ingot stacked for export

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This morning in metals news: the Senate Committee on Appropriations allocated funding for a new Aluminum Import Monitoring system; the United States International Trade Commission voted to continue an aluminum foil investigation; and natural gas inventories are at a record high.

The MetalMiner 2021 Annual Outlook consolidates our 12-month view and provides buying organizations with a complete understanding of the fundamental factors driving prices and a detailed forecast that can be used when sourcing metals for 2021 — including expected average prices, support and resistance levels.

Senate includes funding for Aluminum Import Monitoring system

The domestic aluminum industry has long advocated for the creation of an aluminum import monitoring system. The Aluminum Association has often referred to the existing Steel Import Monitoring and Analysis system as a potential model.

Recently, the Senate Committee on Appropriations included $1.3 million in funding for a new aluminum import monitoring system during the fiscal year 2021.

“We are grateful for the committee’s leadership on this high priority issue for the U.S. aluminum industry, and we look forward to Congress taking action soon to enact this important provision in FY21 appropriations,” said Tom Dobbins, president and CEO of the Aluminum Association, in a release.

“Within Enforcement and Compliance, the Committee provides up to $1,300,000 for staffing and other necessary expenses to support development and implementation of the AIM system,” the Senate Committee on Appropriations said. “The Committee also encourages ITA to regularly consult with the aluminum industry on market dynamics to ensure the remedy is meeting its stated goal of supporting U.S. aluminum producers.”

USITC continues aluminum foil probe

The USITC voted to continue anti-dumping and countervailing duty investigation of aluminum foil from several countries.

The countries in question are Armenia, Brazil, Oman, Russia and Turkey.

In addition, the Department of Commerce will make preliminary countervailing duty determinations by Dec. 23, 2020. However, for its anti-dumping investigation, it will make preliminary determinations by March 8, 2021.

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The Department of Commerce made a preliminary determination in its anti-dumping investigation covering non-refillable steel cylinders imported from China.

The MetalMiner 2021 Annual Outlook consolidates our 12-month view and provides buying organizations with a complete understanding of the fundamental factors driving prices and a detailed forecast that can be used when sourcing metals for 2021 — including expected average prices, support and resistance levels.

DOC rules steel cylinders dumped from China

The DOC determined China dumped the steel products into the U.S. at margins between 57.83% and 114.58%.

The domestic petitioner in the case is Worthington Industries of Columbus, Ohio.

“As a result of today’s decisions, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to collect cash deposits from importers of non-refillable steel cylinders from China based on the preliminary rates noted above,” the DOC said in a release last week.

Imports of non-refillable steel cylinders reached a value of $21.5 million in 2019, per the DOC.

The U.S. International Trade Commission will make its final determination in the case by Feb. 22, 2021.

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Aluminum production

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This morning in metals news: the International Aluminum Institute released global aluminum production totals for September; the U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC) made duty determinations in the investigations related to imports of prestressed concrete steel wire strand; and September unemployment rates fell in 30 states.

The MetalMiner 2021 Annual Outlook consolidates our 12-month view and provides buying organizations with a complete understanding of the fundamental factors driving prices and a detailed forecast that can be used when sourcing metals for 2021 — including expected average prices, support and resistance levels.

Global aluminum production hits 5.42M tons in September

Global aluminum production reached 5.42 million tons in September, the International Aluminum Institute reported.

The total marked a decline from 5.52 million tons in August.

Chinese production totaled an estimated 3.15 million tons last month, down from 3.18 million tons the previous month.

USITC opts to maintain steel wire strand duties

In a five-year sunset review, the USITC voted to maintain existing duties covering imports of prestressed concrete steel wire strand.

The duties cover imports of the products from Brazil, India, Japan, Korea, Mexico and Thailand.

“The U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC) today determined that revoking the existing antidumping and countervailing duty orders on imports of prestressed concrete steel wire strand from Brazil, India, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Thailand would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury within a reasonably foreseeable time,” the USITC said in a prepared statement.

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Airbus and Boeing — or, more reasonably, Brussels and Washington — are still at it, haggling over subsidies both sides have received over the decades.

The action and counteractions, originally started by the U.S. to stem what it saw as a rising European rival to Boeing’s dominance, has been rumbling on for 16 years. Both sides are at fault, the WTO has ruled.

The latest development, as Reuters recently reported, is the WTO has ruled that European government loans to Airbus were unfairly subsidized through low-interest rates while Boeing received unfair support from tax breaks.

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Airbus and Boeing again take center stage

Both sides say they have remedied past flaws and are now in line with WTO rules.

However, the U.S. side feels loans still on Airbus’s books continue to provide unfair support. Furthermore, Washington thinks the European planemaker should repay interest on historic loans set at below-market rates.

Brussels says if that’s the case then Boeing should repay previous subsidies in the form of tax breaks.

The impasse has led to Washington applying $7.5 billion of, tariffs, that most favored tool, on E.U. goods. Meanwhile, the E.U. is asking the WTO later this month to apply $4 billion of tariffs on U.S. goods.

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nickel

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Before we head into the weekend, let’s take a look back at the week that was and the metals storylines here on MetalMiner, including: the nickel market; aluminum prices on the SHFE and LME; China’s metals rebound; and much more.

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Week in Review, Oct. 12-16 (nickel market, China’s metals rebound and more)

The MetalMiner 2021 Annual Outlook consolidates our 12-month view and provides buying organizations with a complete understanding of the fundamental factors driving prices and a detailed forecast that can be used when sourcing metals for 2021 — including expected average prices, support and resistance levels.

India

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Some Indian experts are of the view that the U.S.’s newly imposed import tariff on aluminum sheet products, including on Indian aluminum sheet, will not affect Indian aluminum producers in a major way.

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U.S. slaps anti-dumping duty on Indian aluminum sheet, sheet from 17 other countries

Last Friday, the U.S. imposed fresh tariffs on U.S. $1.96 billion worth of aluminum sheet products from 18 countries, including India.

The U.S. imposed the duty after determining the goods were being dumped, according to U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross.

“The Department’s aluminum sheet investigations constitute the broadest U.S. trade enforcement action in two decades,” Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “We look forward to receiving parties’ comments on the preliminary determinations that aluminum sheet imports from 18 countries have been dumped, and in some cases unfairly subsidized, into the U.S. market.”

Ross added tariffs were being immediately imposed even though the department’s reading was the dumping was preliminary.

“As a result of these decisions, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to collect cash deposits from importers of common alloy aluminum sheet from the above-named countries based on the preliminary rates noted above,” the Department of Commerce said in a release announcing the preliminary determination.

In addition to India, the other countries on the list are: Brazil, Croatia, Egypt, Greece, Indonesia, Italy, Oman, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Taiwan and Turkey.

The U.S. petitioners in the investigation are the Aluminum Association Common Alloy Aluminum Sheet Trade Enforcement Working Group and its individual members.

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India

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India’s Commerce Ministry has launched an inquiry, based on a complaint by Indian steel players, to review the need to reimpose anti-dumping duties on certain steel products imported from at least seven countries, the New Indian Express reported.

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Reimposition of anti-dumping duties

A few months ago, India imposed duties on steel products imported from the U.S., China, Korea, European Union, South Africa, Taiwan and Thailand. With the duties, India aimed to safeguard Indian steel manufacturers from cheap imports.

However, the Commerce Ministry’s Directorate General of Trade Remedies (DGTR) launched a an anti-dumping probe. The investigation follows an application filed by Jindal Stainless Ltd, Jindal Stainless (Hisar) Ltd and Jindal Stainless Steelway Ltd. The “sunset” review covers imports of cold-rolled flat products of stainless steel, of width ranging from 600-1,250 mm from the seven countries.

Countries can impose tariffs on such dumped products to provide a level playing field for domestic manufacturers.

Dumping happens when a company or country exports an item at a price lower than the price of the one made in its domestic market. As such, dumping impacts the product price in the importing nation.

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