Copper MMI Drops as Chilean Production Reaches Historic High

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In January, the Copper Monthly Metals Index (MMI) dropped 3.9%, falling back 3 points to the November 2018 level of 74. Lower LME copper prices drove the index lower.

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Similar to other base metals, LME copper prices fell in December. LME copper prices fell below the $6,000/mt level, which served as a stiff resistance level for most of 2017. Prices over this level indicate a bullish copper market, while prices below that level signal a more bearish trend. This level has represented a psychological signal for “Doctor Copper” since 2017.  

LME Copper prices. Source: MetalMiner analysis of Fastmarkets

So far in January, LME copper prices have increased. However, current levels remain below that $6,000/mt psychological ceiling. Trading volume also appears weaker, which does not support a sharp uptrend.

Global Copper Outlook

According to data released in January, Chilean copper production reached 540,720 tons in November, the highest level in 13 years. The increase was driven by higher ore grades and more efficient processes. As reported by Chile’s national statistics agency INE, copper production increased 7% in November versus October. Production reached its highest levels  since December 2005.

Anglo American announced that overall production will increase more than expected between 2018-2021. Forecasts suggest 2018 production increased by 2%, driven by increases in copper output. 2019 production could increase by another 3%, and 2020-2021 production by an additional 5%.

Despite this forecast by Anglo American, the International Copper Study Group (ICSG) announced a wider deficit in September. The global refined copper deficit increased to 168,000 tons in September from the previous 43,000 tons in August. For the first nine months of 2018, the market saw a 595,000-ton deficit versus the previous year’s deficit of 226,000 tons.

Chinese Scrap Copper

LME copper prices and Chinese copper scrap prices tend to follow the same trend. However, this month they traded differently. LME copper prices fell while Chinese copper scrap prices increased. The divergence between LME copper prices and Chinese copper scrap has become more notable recently, driven by lower scrap availability in China.

Source: MetalMiner data from MetalMiner IndX(™)

The spread has become smaller this month. The wider the spread, the higher the copper scrap consumption, and therefore, the price.

What This Means for Industrial Buyers

LME copper prices fell this month, moving below the $6,000/mt level. Buying organizations will want to understand how to react to the latest copper price movements. Adapting the “right” buying strategy becomes crucial to reduce risks. Only MetalMiner’s Monthly Outlook reports provide a continuously updated snapshot of the market from which buying organizations can determine when and how much of the underlying metal to buy.

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Actual Copper Prices and Trends

In December, most of the prices that comprise the Copper MMI basket fell. LME copper decreased by 4.87% this month. Indian copper prices also fell by 5.91%, while Chinese cash primary copper prices decreased by 3.83%. Prices of U.S. copper producer grades 110 and 122 fell by 3.36%. Meanwhile, the price of U.S. copper producer grade 102 decreased by 3.2%, to $3.64/pound.

Comment (1)

  1. Leo Stanley says:

    I’ve got 70K pounds on hand. Should I hold on till March before selling?

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