MetalMiner Prices

Aluminum Prices

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Carbon Steel Prices

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Nickel Alloy Prices

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Stainless Steel Prices

View quotes and charts of the North American Stainless Steel Index and current pricing for 304 Sheet, and 430 Sheet

Titanium Prices

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Articles on: Metal Prices

The Commerce Department launched an investigation on Wednesday to determine whether a flood of aluminum imports from China and elsewhere was compromising U.S. national security, a step that could lead to broad import restrictions on the lightweight metal.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said the investigation is similar to one announced last week for steel imports into the U.S., invoking Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962.

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“Here’s why we did it,” Ross told reporters, “Imports have been flooding into the aluminum industry and the defense angle is that high-purity aluminum is used in the F-35” as well as other military aircraft and vehicles. In the event of a war, domestic manufacturers might be unable to meet the Pentagon’s needs, Ross said.

The investigation mirrors a probe Commerce launched a week earlier focusing on the steel industry, also invoking section 232 of the act. North American aluminum trade groups have been pushing for such action for the last five years.

Nickel prices reached a 10-month low this week due in part to concern over demand from China, a top consumer of the metal.

According to a report from Reuters, these concerns were supported by Chinese trade data, indicating falling imports on the alloying material used to make stainless steel.

Want a short- and medium-term buying outlook for aluminum, copper, tin, lead, zinc, nickel and several forms of steel? Subscribe to our monthly buying outlook reports!

Nickel traded on the London Metal Exchange ended Wednesday at $9,225 per metric ton, its lowest mark since June of last year.

John Meyer, SP Angel analyst, told the news source he anticipates nickel to be supported by concern over supplies of ore from the Philippines, which recently announced the ordered closure of more than half its mines in order to protect water sources.

“There is still a lot of stock for the market to burn,” Meyer told Reuters.

Nickel Trailing Other Industrial Metals

Our own Raul de Frutos wrote earlier this month of the downward pressure seen on nickel prices during Q1, which is in stark contrast to other industrial metals that have rallied during that same time.

Wrote de Frutos: “Nickel prices are struggling to make headway this year. Nickel’s supply narrative is rather complex and it’s exposed to significant changes depending on what policy makers in Indonesia and The Philippines do next. On the other hand, stainless buyers should continue to monitor their price risk exposure. Investors’ sentiment on industrial metals remains bullish and that could still trigger unexpected prices swings on the upside.”

How will nickel and base metals fare in 2017? You can find a more in-depth copper price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. For a short- and long-term buying strategy with specific price thresholds:

Industrial metals have been on a tear since we called a bull market just about a year ago. However, we have recently witnessed some price weakness over the past couple of months.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

Commodities like industrial metals are cyclical assets which tend to run in the same direction for long periods of time. The key is to recognize the peaks and valleys of the cycle to time your purchases accordingly. 

The industrial metals ETF: peak or pause? Source: MetalMiner analysis of @stockcharts.com data.

The ongoing bull market in industrial metals has run for over a year and while some metals are experiencing some setbacks, it’s a good time to bring up the question: Are we nearing a peak or this is just a pause before prices break on the upside?

To answer this question, let’s look at what the main macro drivers are telling us:

China: Strong Indicators

As we all know, China is the world’s largest producer and consumer of industrial metals. Any changes on China’s supply and demand equation can have a huge impact on the price of metals. The performance of Chinese stock markets are a great gauge of investors’ sentiment on China’s economy. Since China became a major economy, we’ve seen a strong correlation between Chinese markets and metal prices.

Chinese stock market etf trading near highs. Source: MetalMiner analysis of @stockcharts.com data.

Price momentum in Chinese markets has indeed picked up this year, tradin near a two year-high. The latest economic indicators continue to increase investors’ confidence in China.

The country reported growth of 6.9% in the first quarter, its fastest pace since the third quarter of 2015, fueled by credit and infrastructure spending as well as a stubbornly booming property market. Growth prospects in the country also seem to be improving thanks to easing trade tensions with the U.S. In China, investment in buildings, factories and other fixed assets grew 9.2% in the first quarter, while construction starts rose 11.6% during the same period. If that’s not enough, in April, China’s government announced plans to build a new megacity from scratch. The construction will require massive amounts of steel and industrial metals.

This growth translates into solid demand for industrial metals at the same time as China applies stricter anti-pollution rules and supply-side reforms designed to cut capacity in energy-intensive sectors like steel and aluminum. Overall, while we continue to see strength in Chinese markets, we are not ready to call peak in this industrial metals bull market.

US Dollar Falls to 5-Month Low

Base metals are commodities and, as such, move in opposite directions to the dollar. Over the past 20 years, every major bottom in commodities have coincided with a major peak in the U.S. dollar and vice versa. For a continuation of a bull market in industrial metals we should see weakness in the dollar. This year we have seen that.

The U.S. dollar index falls to a 5-month-low. Source: MetalMiner analysis of @stockcharts.com data.

On Monday, the dollar fell to a five-month low due to a surge in the euro after the first round of the French presidential election eased concerns about the future of the European currency. The election outcome could continue to support the euro as markets price out the risk of a far-right victory.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

If centrist candidate Emmanuel Macron gets elected in the final round (May 7), markets might start to focus on the positive macro picture of the euro-area and its higher growth relative to the U.S. That could potentially devalue the dollar against the euro, a bullish development for industrial metal prices.

What This Means For Metal Buyers

Industrial buyers need to watch closely for signs of a market top. For now, the recent price weakness in industrial metals seems normal in the context of a bull market and key indicators such as China and the dollar favor a continuation of this uptrend. Industrial buyers should continue to manage their commodity price risk exposure until we see real signs of a market peak.

The MetalMiner analyst team alerted subscribers and trialers last week to significant movement on the zinc front. Prices for the non-ferrous metal have pulled back over the past several weeks, and are now trading near key support levels.

Wrote our own Raul de Frutos: “The price weakness seems to come from longs exiting their positions rather than shorts coming to the market. This suggests that sentiment hasn’t shifted to bearish for now. This could be a good opportunity to time purchases (3-5 months’ worth of demand) while prices trade near $2,500/mt.”

Want a short- and medium-term buying outlook for aluminum, copper, tin, lead, zinc, nickel and several forms of steel? Subscribe to our monthly buying outlook reports!

While many may panic and see this price decline as the end of zinc’s bull run, de Frutos sees this movement as an ideal opportunity to make purchases at an attractive price.

de Frutos added: “After doubling in price since the beginning of 2016, prices are now struggling in the $3,000 per metric ton level. However, the price weakness seems to come from long position buyers exiting those positions rather than shorts coming to the market. This suggests that sentiment hasn’t shifted to bearish for now. At the same time, we see strong support near $2,500/mt, which could provide a good opportunity to time purchases.”

How will zinc and base metals fare in 2017? You can find a more in-depth copper price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. For a short- and long-term buying strategy with specific price thresholds:

Lead ore. Source: Adobestock.

Lead prices, along with tin, lost some ground on the non-ferrous metals market on April 18, due in part to stockists selling as the result of subdued demand in the user industries.

According to a report from the Business Standard, lead fell slightly lower than tin with copper dropping by an even smaller margin.

Want a short- and medium-term buying outlook for aluminum, copper, tin, lead, zinc, nickel and several forms of steel? Subscribe to our monthly buying outlook reports!

Elsewhere in the realm of non-ferrous metals, lead’s sister metal zinc has seen its prices fall off sharply over the past several weeks.

Our own Raul de Frutos warns that now is the time to buy, although it’s important not to panic and view this as the end of zinc’s bull run. In fact, this is nothing more than a great opportunity to purchase the metal at an attractive price.

de Frutos wrote: “After doubling in price since the beginning of 2016, prices are now struggling in the $3,000 per metric ton level. However, the price weakness seems to come from long position buyers exiting those positions rather than shorts coming to the market. This suggests that sentiment hasn’t shifted to bearish for now. At the same time, we see strong support near $2,500/mt, which could provide a good opportunity to time purchases.”

Lead Price Outlook for 2017

How will lead and base metals fare in 2017? You can find a more in-depth copper price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. For a short- and long-term buying strategy with specific price thresholds:

Tin prices have rebounded since March. Prices fell sharply earlier this year but they have now found stability in Q2. As we pointed out in February, that month presented a good opportunity to buy tin. During bull markets, it’s good to time your purchases after a price pullback.

Tin prices bounce off support levels. Source: MetalMiner analysis of LME data.

Indonesian Exports Up

Indonesia is the world’s largest tin-exporting nation. Indonesian tin exports for 2016 totaled 63,559 metric tons, down by 9.4% compared to 2015. The decline came as Indonesia tightened its rules for tin exports in a bid to crackdown on environmental degradation and smuggling.

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However, the export permit process has been far smoother this year. For the first quarter, exports were up by 3.1% compared to the final quarter of 2016, and up 86% year-on-year. According to the International Tin Research Institute, many smelters in the country are operating on tight margins, with some understood to have paused production when prices dropped below US$19,000/mt in February before resuming when prices recovered above $20,000/mt. ITRI expects Indonesian refined shipments this year to remain broadly level with 2016. The next few months figures will give as a clearer picture on how much metal Indonesia will export this year.

Myanmar Shipments Fall

According to the ITRI, Myanmar was the source of over 99% of China’s reported tin ore and concentrate imports in January and February, which totaled exactly 40,000 mt, down 51% from 81,077 mt for the same period of 2016.

Two-Month Trial: Metal Buying Outlook

While China’s Spring Festival impacted Myanmar’s February tin exports in both 2016 and 2017, the lower overall shipments can be explained by the large sales of local government concentrate stockpiles in January 2016. For that reason, it seems too early to tell whether exports will continue to decline or not but ITRI expects exports to be limited in 2017.

What This Means For Metal Buyers

Tin’s performance for the balance of 2017 will strongly depend on the production levels of these two Asian countries. For now, supply seems to be limited while most established producers are struggling to maintain, let alone increase, production. Meanwhile, the demand outlook for the whole industrial metals pack looks stronger than expected, which should provide a floor to prices this year.

Beijing is caught in something of a quandary.

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On the one hand, an admirable, and increasingly important social imperative, the Chinese government’s focus on air pollution, has resulted in a crackdown on a range of polluting industries. Coal-fired power stations around Beijing and other major cities have been closed. Steel capacity has been targeted for cutbacks, although not universally.

Reports suggest rebar production used in construction has been prioritized over other product areas and that’s just one example of selective enforcement. A recent report by Reuters states new aluminum production capacity has been halted. What China fails to meet capacity cutback targets — an issue one suspects would have been “worked around” a year or two back when environmental considerations where less of an imperative?

This crackdown on output comes at the same time as the economy is performing quite well. Official data released last week showed China’s economy grew by a better-than-expected 6.9% comparing the March quarter to the same period in the previous year, Australian Financial Review reports. That is up from 6.8% in the final quarter of 2016. Industrial production was also far better than forecast, growing at 7.6% in March compared to 6.3% in first two months of the year. Read more

Lithium Australia is making inroads to Germany for a joint venture with Deutsche Rohstoff, parent company of Tin International, in an attempt to uncover lithium in the region for production purposes.

Want a short- and medium-term buying outlook for aluminum, copper, tin, lead, zinc, nickel and several forms of steel? Subscribe to our monthly buying outlook reports!

According to a recent report from Business News, the key piece in the venture is Tin International’s Sadisdorf Tin deposit, a globally renowned Altenberg mine, which has been dormant since 1991 following 500 years of production. The mine is believed to contain a lithium-rich mica that is suited for Lithium Australia’s proprietary extraction means.

Adrian Griffin, managing director at Lithium Australia said, “The joint venture with Tin International provides Lithium Australia with a low-cost entry into an established JORC resource, albeit originally established for tin.”

“There is little doubt that a substantial Lithium inventory also exists and the focus of the joint venture is to fast-rack the project to feasibility,” he added. “The experience provided by Tin International will be a key element in expediting the evaluation process and we are pleased to have them as a partner.”

Your Tin Price Outlook for 2017

How will tin and base metals fare in 2017? You can find a more in-depth copper price forecast and outlook in our brand new Monthly Metal Buying Outlook report. For a short- and long-term buying strategy with specific price thresholds:

President Donald Trump (R-N.Y.) is set to sign an executive order this afternoon ordering enforcement and review of the H-1B visa program, popular in the technology industry, on a visit to the headquarters of Snap-On Inc., a tool manufacturer in Kenosha, Wis., according to senior administration officials.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

He will also use what the White House called the “Buy American and Hire American” order to seek changes in government procurement that would boost purchases of American products in federal contracts, with one aim being to help U.S. steelmakers.

The moves show Trump once again using his power to issue executive orders to try to fulfill promises he made last year in his election campaign, in this case to reform U.S. immigration policies and encourage purchases of American products.

“Strong Buy America domestic procurement preferences for federally funded infrastructure projects are vital to the health of the domestic steel industry, and have helped create manufacturing jobs and build American infrastructure,” said Thomas J. Gibson, president and CEO of the American Iron and Steel Institute, the largest trade group for North American steel manufacturers. “The foundation of a strong Buy America program is the longstanding requirement that all iron and steel-making processes occur in the U.S. for a product to be Buy America compliant — from the actual steel production to the finishing processes. This ‘melted and poured’ standard has been successfully applied since 1983 and must continue to be the standard used in federal Buy America rules for steel procurement. We applaud President Trump for affirming his commitment to full and effective enforcement of our Buy America laws, and to addressing the issue of unfairly dumped and subsidized steel, in signing this Executive Order today.”

Coking coal has more than doubled in two weeks on the back of disruption to Australia’s coal exports associated with Cyclone Debbie, which caused the evacuation of several mines and damaged coal trains supplying export terminals, forcing some miners to declare force majeure on their deliveries.

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It is estimated that shipments accounting for 50% of the global coking coal supply will be delayed and that Australia will need at least two months to regularize its coking coal exports following the natural disaster.

Australian coking coal’s free-on-board price in US dollars per metric ton. Source:mining.com.

Coking coal prices rose sharply in the second half of last year when China reduced allowable work days at the country’s coal mines, which reduced output and tightened the global coking coal market. These events added fuel to rising steel prices in China. But a slump in coking coal prices since December added pressure to steel prices, especially in China since the country strongly depends on the commodity to make steel.

Can Higher Coking Coal Prices Give a New Boost to Chinese Steel Prices?

The Chinese cold-rolled coil price. Source: MetalMiner IndX.

Australia is the world’s biggest coking coal exporter and is China’s largest supplier. The recent disruptions are forcing China to look for alternative supplies. Russia, Mongolia and Indonesia are other potential sources of coking coal for China’s hungry mills. Meanwhile, North Korea is out of China’s exporter list after Beijing ordered an import ban following North Korean missile tests.

Two-Month Trial: Metal Buying Outlook

Higher coking coal prices translate into higher input costs, particularly in China. Chinese steel prices set the floor for international steel prices, a topic that we discussed recently. Steel buyers should monitor the recent surge in coking coal prices closely as  since steelmakers will potentially pass on the increase to consumers, giving a boost to weakening steel prices in China.