Articles in Category: Precious Metals

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Now’s the time to buy those solar panels you’ve been saving up for. This week, Tesla announced that it is taking orders and deposits for solar roof tiles that look stunningly like… regular roof tiles. But therein lies the appeal, and the $42-per-square-foot cost isn’t so bad either, lower than what industry analysts expected, Bloomberg reported.

Keep Your Eye on Silver

This growing interest in solar energy has been supporting the demand for silver, according to the Silver Institute’s World Silver Survey 2017, which Taras Berezowsky covered on MetalMiner this week. As Berezowsky wrote, “According to the report, silver demand for photovoltaic applications shot up 34% to reach 76.6 million ounces. This growth was the strongest since 2010, and it was driven by a 49% increase in global solar panel installations.”

Two-Month Trial: Metal Buying Outlook

In addition, “automotive will be an interesting sector to watch,” Berezowsky wrote. Silver demand could be driven up further as the world moves towards electric vehicles — whose engines and circuit boards require silver — however slowly, as Stuart Burns noted earlier this morning.

Bearish Times

“If you are a metal buyer, it doesn’t matter if you buy aluminum, copper, steel or tin,” Raul de Frutos wrote in his commodities outlook this week. “The information in this article is important for you.” Commodities may have enjoyed a bull market in early 2016, but things appear to have shifted to the bear-ish. “Commodities not only have struggled to make new headway,” de Frutos wrote. “In the past few days they have weakened significantly. Recent moves in China have caused a significant shift of sentiment in financial markets.” Read more

Source: Gildor Elendill. Licensed under CC-BY

Now that Black Sails has signed off and Long John Silver is on to new adventures, it’s time to turn our attention to a different type of silver — one type of material that Silver himself spent many of his buccaneer days trying to amass.

But whereas Silver and his crew may have preoccupied themselves with coins, bars and doubloons (the former two are still big in 2017; doubloons? not so sure), we here at MetalMiner like to see how the precious metal factors into industrial end-use sectors and applications.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

Turns out that one of those applications — solar panel installations, specifically — made quite a splash in the Silver Institute’s World Silver Survey 2017, produced by the GFMS team at Thomson Reuters and released just this morning.

But first, a quick high-level overview.

Topline Takeaways

Global silver mine production declined by 0.6% in 2016 to a total of 885.8 million ounces — the first such decline since 2002, according to the report.

In addition, although primary silver production increased 1% last year, silver scrap supply, despite higher silver prices, fell to 139.7 million ounces in 2016. This is a level that has not been seen in 20 years, according to the Silver Institute’s press release for the report.

“If we look forward, we don’t think [this overall mine production drop] will be a one-off, either,” said Johann Wiebe, lead analyst of metals demand at the GFMS Team/Thomson Reuters in London, in an interview. “It’ll be a prolonged drop in supply until 2019-ish. Not large, but maybe a 2% drop annually. That’s quite a shift.”

It’s not surprising, Wiebe added, if one has seen the capital expenditures retreating over the past few years, with miners looking to protect their margins. Other non-precious metal production of base metals such as lead, zinc and copper, among others, affects the silver market — the link between precious metal and base metal commodities, in other words, is tighter than at first glance when it comes to production trends. Read more

Our Global Precious Metals MMI inched up a point in April. However, this year the index seems to be struggling near 84 points. Let’s take a look at gold and palladium, two of the precious metals integrated in this index, to better understand the ongoing trend in precious metals.

Two-Month Trial: Metal Buying Outlook

Gold

Some analysts are saying that gold is up this year on its safe haven appeal due to rising geopolitical instability. But that’s simply not true. Otherwise, we would see it reflected in stock market indexes, which are trading at record highs. Not only the U.S. but also Europe, China and other emerging markets are seeing their stock markets hit multi-year highs. Investors are confident about the prospects for the global economy, and until something proves them wrong, gold is lacking any appeal as a safe haven.

Gold CME contract. Source: MetalMiner analysis of stockcharts.com

If you held gold this year, don’t thank rising political tensions; simply thank a weaker dollar and some dip buying. This year’s rally in gold follows a 18% price slump in Q4 of last year. But prices are back to their average and just 8% below $1,380/oz, a level that has been a ceiling to gold prices for four consecutive years. This means that investors will have to find good reasons to chase prices higher. Given the ongoing strength across global stock markets and the rather neutral picture of the dollar, we wouldn’t expect gold investors to get a good return on their money for the balance of the year.

Palladium

As I’ve written earlier on MetalMiner, “palladium prices rose to a two-year high in April, making it the biggest gainer among precious metals. Last month we outlined some of the factors contributing to the palladium price rise: a growing auto sector; a strong South African currency; a falling dollar; and bullish sentiment across industrial metals. However, as prices continue to climb, it’s time to question how high prices can go. Despite a still solid outlook, there are some reasons to believe palladium prices could be nearing their peak.”

One of them is a potential slowdown in demand for cars. U.S. car sales declined in April, following a disappointing month of March. Markets suspect that the car industry boom that has run since 2010 has now come to an end.

Meanwhile in China, car sales are still going strong, but the pace is not the same as last year. As I wrote before, “weaker sales tax incentives have put pressure on demand this year and are expected to slow down demand even more next year. Buyers of cars with engines up to 1.6 liters paid a 5% purchase tax last year, but they are now paying a 7.5% rate. Buyers are still finding incentives to rush on buying cars this year since the rate will increase to 10% in 2018.”

Palladium nears long-term resistance levels. Source: MetalMiner analysis of stockcharts.com data

Finally, as with the case of gold, palladium might need the stronger fundamentals to lure investors to chase prices higher. Historically, palladium has peaked in the range of $850-$900. Prices closed in April at $827.

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What This Means For Metal Buyers

Precious metals gained this year, but gains won’t come easily from now onwards. The opportunity to buy or invest in precious metals might have passed by.

Read more

This morning in metals news, we’ve seen prices for copper and gold reach three-week highs and lows, respectively.

FREE REPORT: How Circumvention Impacts Both Downstream, Value-Added Manufacturing

Threat of Supply Disruption Has Driven Up Copper Prices

Copper prices reached a three-week high today, Reuters reported, driven by potential supply disruptions. This news comes after yesterday’s rally near the Grasberg copper mine in Indonesia. Thousands of workers from the Indonesian unit of Freeport McMoRan Inc. took part, protesting against layoffs that resulted from the company’s contract dispute with the government.

Freeport had laid off 10% of its workforce, with potentially more layoffs to come. As a response, the union representing the workers has threatened to strike for the month of May.

A Three-Week Low for Gold Prices

In contrast, gold prices fell on Monday as the threat of a U.S. government shutdown faded and the U.S. dollar edged slightly higher. The metal has dropped to $1,255.50 per ounce, the lowest gold prices have been since April 10, according to FactSet data. Political tensions in Europe had kept gold prices up so far this year, but that trend seems to have been reversed.

In related news, S&P Global Platts reported that gold production in China, the world’s top gold producer as well as consumer, fell significantly in Q1 2017. In this past quarter, China produced 101.2 tons of gold, which is a 9.3% drop compared with 111.6 tons in Q1 2016.

Bernanke Argues in Favor of a Border Adjustment Tax

Former Federal Reserve Chair Ben Bernanke came out in support of the proposed border adjustment tax (BAT), suggesting to CNBC that the GOP had not presented the idea well. Bernanke argued that a stronger dollar would negate any negative effects of the BAT – which would tax imports and exempt exports – by increasing U.S. companies’ purchasing power and lowering the cost of overseas manufacturing.

Palladium prices rose to a two-year high in April, making it the biggest gainer among precious metals. Last month we outlined some of the factors contributing to the palladium price rise: a growing auto sector; a strong South African currency; a falling dollar; and bullish sentiment across industrial metals. However, as prices continue to climb, it’s time to question how high prices can go. Despite a still solid outlook, there are some reasons to believe palladium prices could be nearing their peak:

Palladium prices hit 2-year high. Source: MetalMiner analysis of stockcharts.com data

Global Demand for Cars

Eighty percent of palladium demand comes from cars. China has the largest auto market, followed by the United States. Therefore, car sales in these two countries are very important for palladium’s demand outlook.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

Car sales in the U.S. fell short of expectations in March, down 1.6% compared with March 2016. After two years of record sales, the auto industry seems to have hit a plateau. The U.S. industry might have to come up with discounts and incentives to continue to increase sales.

US total vehicle sales. Source: tradingeconomics.com

Car sales in China rose 13.7% in 2016 compared to 2015. The astonishing performance of China’s auto market helped boost palladium prices last year. Sales are still running strong this year but not at the same pace as last year. According to the Wall Street Journal, sales of vehicles, excluding those typically used for commercial purposes, rose 1.7% to 2.1 million units in March from a year earlier.

Weaker sales-tax incentive have put pressure on demand this year and are expected to slow down demand even more next year. Buyers of cars with engines up to 1.6 liters paid a 5% purchase tax last year, but they are now paying a 7.5% rate. Buyers are still finding incentives to rush on buying cars this year since the rate will increase to 10% in 2018.

Palladium Nears Resistance Levels

Palladium nears long-term resistance levels. Source: MetalMiner analysis of stockcharts.com data

Palladium prices have risen steadily since the beginning of 2016, but the metal is now trading at historically high levels, which could play against this rally. Historically, palladium has peaked in the range of $850-$900. Prices closed last week at $827.

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This doesn’t mean that prices will necessarily peak at these levels again, but we suspect that the closer prices get to those levels, the stronger the fundamentals will need to be to lure investors to chase prices higher.

What This Means For Metal Buyers

Palladium’s outlook continues to look good, but a potential slowdown in global auto sales and stiff price resistance near $850-$900 could put a ceiling to palladium’s rally this year.

Gold bears have had quite a ride since the start of this year. The price spiked to $1,286 per ounce last week, a rise of 11% since the end of last year as this chart courtesy of the Financial Times shows.

Gold in 2017

Source: Financial Times

Despite a gradually improving global economic picture, geopolitical tensions have increased in recent months first with Syria and more recently with President Donald Trump’s announcement that he was prepared to take military action in North Korea.

Two-Month Trial: Metal Buying Outlook

In Europe, investors looking to protect themselves against the political risk associated with the first round of the French presidential elections where the fear of a shock victory by the far right leader Marine Le Pen was considered a distinct possibility. During this same period, the U.S. dollar has weakened somewhat in value and with gold inversely correlated to the currency, as the dollar falls gold, and other commodity prices, rise.

Well, what a difference a week makes. North Korea has shown itself to be less capable and in the face of a tougher stance from America, less belligerent than during previous bouts of posturing.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

In the French elections, the least bad option, Emmanuel Macron, has emerged victorious from the first round over Marine Le Pen with nearly all observers expecting he will win through in the second round of voting on May 7. Later this week we should hear President Trump’s tax policies which are widely expected to include substantial reductions in personal and corporate tax rates. On the back of solid U.S. and global economic growth, such inflationary fiscal stimulus will only hasten further U.S. Federal Reserve rate increases. Not surprisingly, Goldman Sachs is not alone in predicting further weakness in the gold price, which weakened promptly on the news of the French elections and is targeted by Goldman to fall to $1,200 per ounce this summer. While not a universal truth, Goldman Sachs predictions do tend do have an element of being self-fulfilling simply because so many investors take their advice into consideration when making investment decisions.

Gold Bears

These gold bears haven’t had as big a run as their metals brethren. Source: Haribo

Of course, there remain counter arguments as to why the gold price may yet rise. Trump’s presidential decrees are easier to make than getting legislature onto the statute book. Proclamations this week over the tax reduction will likely meet a more favorable Republican response than there was the case with healthcare but, even so, may be much delayed or watered-down before having any impact on the economy.

Likewise, U.S. growth could slow reducing the impetus for the Fed to deliver on its three expected rate increases this year. The Fed has frequently undershot rate rise expectations over recent years. Finally, our friend in Pyongyang has the ability, and no doubt inclination, to still do something stupid despite pressure being brought to bear to back down by his Chinese bankers. On balance, though, gold bears have probably had as good run this year as they are likely to get and profit-taking is now inevitable for all but long-term holders of the yellow metal.

The launch of the London Metal Exchange‘s new precious metals contracts will be delayed until July 10, more than a month later than previously announced, it said on Monday.

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The new gold and silver contracts, a mix of daily and monthly contracts designed to enable industrial users to hedge specific dates, were due to go live in early June.

Lighthizer Clears Committee for Confirmation as US Trade Rep

President Donald Trump’s nominee for U.S. trade representative cleared a Senate committee on Tuesday, bringing the administration closely to enacting its full trade policy.

Washington lawyer Robert Lighthizer’s nomination cleared the Senate Finance Committee 26-0. Lighthizer is seen as an ally of the manufacturing industries. The panel also voted to approve a legal waiver for Lighthizer from a 1995 law that prohibits people who did work on behalf of foreign governments from serving as the top U.S. trade negotiator.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

“Bob Lighthizer understands the issues that the U.S. steel industry faces today and we are certain he will make an outstanding United States Trade Representative (USTR),” said Thomas Gibson, president and CEO of the American Iron & Steel Institute, the largest trade group of North American steelmakers. “We thank Senator Hatch and the other members of the Senate Finance Committee for holding an executive session to progress Bob’s nomination. American manufacturers need a qualified USTR and we urge the Senate to promptly confirm Bob Lighthizer.”

Lighthizer’s confirmation now moves on to the full Senate.

This month, some of our metals reached new heights while others saw their rallies noticeably falter.

Aluminum and Raw Steels are still riding high, while complicated supply stories saw stainless and copper fall. Demand from manufacturers for almost all of the metals we track remains strong.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

17 Of the 18 manufacturing industries tracked by the Institute for Supply Management’s index of national factory activity reported growth and no industry reported a contraction last month. Buyers still might want to beware as metal markets are showing more pull-backs than we witnessed in March, despite the overall bullish behavior across the entire industrial metals complex.

Palladium has been the best performer among precious metals for some time now. Since the beginning of 2016, palladium is up 65%, easily beating the price increases seen in platinum, gold and silver.

Benchmark Your Current Metal Price by Grade, Shape and Alloy: See How it Stacks Up

What factors made palladium outperform its peers and what should palladium buyers pay attention to this year?

Global Demand for Cars

According to Inside Advantage’s Outlook 2016 report, “the primary bullish factor might be the expansion of auto catalyst demand for palladium, particularly in China where air pollution problems are increasing. The auto sector accounts for around 80% of palladium demand.”

Chinese car sales for the first two months of 2017 beat expectations and were 8.8% higher compared to the same period in 2016. According to a Market Watch report, the pace is still weaker than the 14% increase reported last year by the industry as tax incentives urged customers to buy cars. In Q4 of 2016, China announced a 50% cut in its sales tax from 10% to 5% for small automobiles. The tax cut was effective until the end of 2016.

Most analysts were expecting a big slowdown in the largest automobile market this year, but China continues to surprise markets. The country agreed to extend the cut, although at a higher rate of 7.5%. In 2018 it will revert to 10%. Therefore, while auto sales might not beat the high levels reached last year, Chinese citizens will still likely take advantage of a lower tax in 2017.

According to a recent Reuters article, “March’s figures for the world’s second-largest automotive market came in below market expectations and gave early evidence that the growth in America’s car sales may be running out of steam. Sales in March fell by 1.6% compared with the same month a year ago.”

Overall, auto markets were really strong in 2016, contributing to a 50% rise in palladium prices last year. This market might surprise again in 2017 but signs of a plateau in the U.S. and uncertainties in China due to an extended but higher tax cut are factors to watch this year.

Strong South African Currency

South African Rand Index. Source:MetalMiner analysis of @stockcharts.com data.

South Africa is the largest producer of palladium, and controls around 40% of world output. The Rand (South African currency) has been one of the best performing currencies since 2016. A rising Rand makes South African exports more expensive to the rest of the world, limiting producers margins and potentially leading to a reduction of output. Read more

Our monthly Global Precious Metals MMI dipped down a point in April from last month, losing 1.2% to end up at 83.

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Ultimately, most gold, silver, platinum and palladium price points from the U.S., China, Japan and India dropped off for the month, which led to the sub-index’s overall decline — but there was one price point that decided to blaze its own trail upward.

The U.S. palladium bar price rose 3.4% over the past month, the third straight month of increases on the MetalMiner IndX.

What’s Going on with Palladium?

Well, automotive sector demand for palladium, at least on a spot or short-term basis, would be a hard case to make.

As my colleague, Jeff Yoders, reported earlier this week, U.S. automakers’ sales figures for March came in below market expectations and gave early evidence that America’s long boom cycle for automotive sales may finally be losing steam.

Automakers sold 1.56 million new cars and trucks in March, a 1.6% decline compared with the same month a year ago.

For example, Ford Motor Company took the biggest hit among sales drops, seeing its March numbers fall more than 7% from February’s.

Two-Month Trial: Metal Buying Outlook

According to a recent Seeking Alpha article, “going into 2017 the market was considering limited supply to be the primary factor supporting palladium prices,” with limited sector growth expected from the U.S. and European markets, and China being the only auto market to be counted on for buoyed sales.

The above has generally held true, while seasonality and investor interest in ETFs seemed to have been playing into palladium’s rise. This could well be the high point for palladium prices this first half of the year.

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