Aluminum

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This morning in metals news, European aluminum maker Constellium moves its U.S. offices from New York to Baltimore, copper and aluminum take a step back, and AK Steel announces a price hike.

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Constellium to Set up Shop in Baltimore

European aluminum firm Constellium announced it will move its U.S. corporate offices from New York to Baltimore, The Baltimore Sun reported Wednesday.

According to a statement from Constellium, at least 25 senior management and executives will be relocated to the new Baltimore office by the end of 2018.

Constellium, which has its corporate headquarters in Amsterdam and two additional corporate offices in Paris and Switzerland, produces aluminum products for a wide range of industries, including aerospace, automotive, transportation, defense and packaging.

Copper, Aluminum Fall Back

After recently hitting multi-year highs, copper and aluminum fell on Thursday.

According to Reuters, the drop is the result of investors who “locked in profits from a steep rally amid doubts about future demand in top metals consumer China.”

Speculator activity has seen the LME index rise 16% from early June, according to the report.

AK Steel Announces Price Hike

Effective immediately, AK Steel will raise the price for all carbon flat-rolled steel products by a minimum of $30 per ton, according to a report on Nasdaq.com.

Since last August, AK Steel’s shares have risen 5%, compared with 21.8% for the industry, according to the report.

Despite that disparity, AK Steel had a strong second quarter, topping earnings and sales estimates, according to the Nasdaq report.

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The company reported net income of $61.2 million (or 19 cents per share), up 253.7% from net income of $17.3 million (or 8 cents) recorded in the prior-year quarter, the report says.  The company also recorded net sales of $1,557.2 million for the quarter, up 4.3% from the year-ago quarter, exceeding the Zacks Consensus Estimate of $1,530 million.

The bullish trend has become even stronger.

Copper and zinc prices have joined the bullish trend led by aluminum in the latest rally, which started at the beginning of August.

This new uptrend in these three metals is accompanied by heavy buying volume — signaling a a bull market.

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As suggested in our article published Tuesday, aluminum prices have outperformed and broke out from their sideways trend.

Source: MetalMiner analysis of FastMarkets

Copper prices have decided to join in on the fun, and are also trending up again.

After the breathtaking rise that copper prices demonstrated at the end of July, prices are up again. A bullish sentiment has returned for copper.

Source: MetalMiner analysis of FastMarkets

Zinc prices have also hit their highest levels recorded since 2007, according to FastMarkets historical data, and point to a possible continuing uptrend. A rally in zinc prices occurred just after the sharp increase in aluminum prices. Buying trading volumes remain heavy, therefore the uptrend is underpinned by strong buying sentiment.

Overall Outlook

Although MetalMiner considers a variety of variables, indexes and data to analyze market sentiment, the most important variable is how metal prices behave.

Commodities have re-started a short-term uptrend after they lost steam at the beginning of the year. Meanwhile, industrial metals have moved from bullish (to nearly sideways/top, as we had even considered switching our industrial metal outlook to bearish but did not) to absolutely bullish again (mainly caused by these three metals rallies). The U.S. dollar has fallen relentlessly since the beginning of the year.

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What This means for Buying Organizations

Buying organizations should watch metal prices closely to determine the best strategy to commit long- and short-term purchases.

For more insight into forward buys and hedging, subscribe to our monthly reports.

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For three months, MetalMiner has claimed a sideways trend for aluminum. This sideways trend could both signal a market top or a price consolidation, and a continuation pattern of the bullish market that started last year.

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The price increase in aluminum has coincided  with heavy trading volume, signaling a breakout of a price consolidation. Thus, we could see a bullish uptrend for aluminum, which means increasing aluminum prices.

Source: MetalMiner analysis of FastMarkets

As previously explained by MetalMiner, buying in a bullish market means buying organizations will want to identify opportunities to buy forward (hedge).

This new price increase, together with other strength in LME base metals (such as copper), may be the start of a new uptrend for aluminum.

The U.S. dollar has also continued to show weaknesses this year, providing a lift to base-metal prices. The CRB index is still in a long-term downtrend, but has shown a slight recovery in the short-term trend. The DBB index is currently in an uptrend, both for the long- and short-term.

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Buying organizations may want to buy forward given aluminum price dynamics, together with trading volume.

For more insight into forward buys and hedging, subscribe to our Monthly Metal Buying Outlooks.

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This morning in metals news, the still-pending Section 232 investigations into steel and aluminum imports, raw steel production is up 2.7% in the U.S. year-over-year and aluminum has reached its highest point in 2.5 years.

Uncertainty Growing in Aluminum Market

It’s not exactly surprising that some in the aluminum and steel industries are feeling anxious about the Section 232 investigations, still unresolved, initiated by the Trump administration in April.

According to a report in Platts, that’s exactly how some are feeling on the aluminum side. Not only that, the uncertainty is making what was already considered a volatile aluminum market even more volatile.

Another potential consequence of the investigation? The cost of downstream products could go up, according to industry sources cited by Platts.

Raw Steel Production Down From Previous Week, Up For the Year

The American Iron and Steel Institute released its weekly raw steel production data on Monday, and the numbers are both up and down.

For the week ending Aug. 5, production was down 0.4% from the previous week ending July 29. Production for the week ending Aug. 5 amounted to 1,762,000 tons.

Production for the year to date, however, was up 2.7%, with 53,870,000 tons produced through Aug. 5 this year.

Aluminum Heats Up

The durable metal reached a 2.5-year high Tuesday on news of Chinese supply cuts and signs of strong Chinese demand, Reuters reported.

According to the report, 3.21 million tons of production will be shut down in China’s Shandong province.

LME aluminum eclipsed the $2,000/ton mark on Tuesday, reaching as high as $2,007 — the highest since December 2014, according to Reuters.

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This morning in metals news, Indian steel company JSW Steel Ltd. could partner with a Japanese firm to acquire distressed Indian companies, steel import permit applications fell 12.3% in the U.S. last month and Chinese aluminum capacity cuts are sending prices up.

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Steel Tycoon Sajjan Jindal Open to Partnership with JFE

A deal might be in the works between Indian and Japanese companies.

Bloomberg reported Sajjan Jindal and his JSW Steel Ltd. would be open to investment from the Japanese firm JFE Holdings Inc., per JSW Joint Managing Director Seshagiri Rao. According to the report, JSW is looking to acquire distressed companies in India.

With plants in southern and western India, JSW is looking to expand into the eastern half of the country.

Steel Imports Permit Applications Fall in July

According to the Commerce Department’s most recent Steel Import Monitoring and Analysis (SIMA) data, steel import permit applications fell 12.3% in July compared with the previous month.

According to a release from the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI), in July the largest finished steel import permit applications for offshore countries were for: South Korea (333,000 net tons, down 14% from June preliminary), Turkey (211,000 net tons, down 36%), Japan (149,000 net tons, up 20%), Germany (144,000 net tons, up 24%) and Taiwan (136,000 net tons, down 17%).

Through the first seven months of 2017, the largest offshore suppliers were South Korea (2,261,000 net tons, down 5% from the same period in 2016), Turkey (1,681,000 net tons, up 11%) and Japan (935,000 net tons, down 12%).

Chinese Capacity Cuts Lead to Rising Aluminum Prices

The longevity of the positive effects of China’s capacity cuts has been debated here and elsewhere. In some cases, capacity cuts have simply given way to new capacity elsewhere, effectively negating the initial cuts’ support of aluminum prices.

For now, however, the most recent round of aluminum capacity cuts in China has been good news for the metal’s price, which has risen in recent days.

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According to Reuters, China is “forcing the suspension of aluminum plants that have not obtained proper permits to build or expand, or that have not met strict environmental standards.”

According to Reuters, shares of Aluminium Corp of China rose 47 percent since the start of July. Shares in Shenzhen-listed Yunnan Aluminium rose even more, by a whopping 55 percent.

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This morning in metals news, President Donald Trump might be close to a decision on how to deal with what are considered unfair Chinese trade policies, environmentally friendly aluminum produced by hydro-powered smelters is coming at a hefty price tag and aluminum got a positive boost Wednesday that might prove short-lived.

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Trump Could be Close to Decision on China Trade

According to a Reuters report, a Trump administration official said President Trump is close to a decision on how to respond to Chinese trade practices he considers unfair.

While the results of the Section 232 investigations into steel and aluminum imports have yet to be announced, Reuters reports Trump might ask U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer to initiate a Section 301 investigation of Chinese trade practices. A Section 301 investigation offers the “authority to enforce trade agreements, resolve trade disputes, and open foreign markets to U.S. goods and services.”

Section 301 was most recently used this past December by the Obama administration in the long-running dispute over the EU’s ban on U.S. beef, which dates back to 1989.

‘Green’ Aluminum to Cost a Lot of Green

Hydro-powered aluminum smelters producing so-called “green” aluminum are charging quite a bit for their product, according to a Reuters report.

Why? It’s partly because industrial consumers are under pressure to reduce their carbon footprints, so demand is high.

Big names like Norway’s Norsk Hydro, U.S.-based Alcoa, Russia’s Rusal and London-listed Rio Tinto all view this green wave as good news, Reuters reports.

Will more and more companies get on board with aluminum produced by more environmentally friendly processes? It’s safe to say that demand will likely only continue to grow in this sector (and for greener products and processes, generally).

Aluminum Gets a Boost, But It Might Not Last

Continuing with the aluminum thread, the metal got a boost Wednesday on news of expected capacity cuts, Reuters reported.

According to Reuters, the aluminum price moved up because of expectations of Chinese capacity cuts. However, as has been mentioned here before, the aluminum momentum might not last, as the capacity cuts might just end up being wiped out by new capacity.

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For example, Hongqiao Group plans to shut more than 2 million tons a year of outdated smelter capacity, Reuters reported — but after new investments, capacity will likely remain around current levels.

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This afternoon in metals news, a recent survey of automakers indicates aluminum’s use in vehicles will grow in a big way over the next decade, U.S. steel production for the week is down slightly from the previous week and copper keeps on soaring.

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The Rise of Aluminum

According to a recent survey of automakers released by The Aluminum Association and conducted by Ducker Worldwide, automakers expect usage of the light, durable metal to increase significantly in the manufacturing of automobiles.

Total aluminum content for North American lightweight vehicles will increase to nearly 9 billion pounds, reaching 565 pounds per vehicle (PPV) and representing 16% of total vehicle weight by 2028, according to the survey results.

“As our automotive customers embrace a multi-material approach to new car and truck design, that directly translates to increased amounts of aluminum,” said Heidi Brock, president and CEO of the Aluminum Association, in the release. “On top of 40 years of uninterrupted growth, the aluminum industry is experiencing a level of sustained growth not seen before in any market or product sector. However, the true winners of this change are American consumers who can choose next-generation cars and trucks that are high performing, efficient, safe, sustainable and more fun to drive.”

According to the release, the expected rise in aluminum use is “consistent with the emerging trend of automakers transitioning to a multi-material vehicle (MMV) design approach, choosing aluminum for doors, hoods and trunk lids, body-in-white, bumpers and crash boxes.”

Steel Production Has Small Week-Over-Week Dip

U.S. steel production dipped 0.2 percent from the week ending July 22 to the week ending July 29, according to data from the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI).

Approximately 1.67 millions tons were produced last week, compared with 1.77 million tons during the week ending July 22.

However, the July 29 total is a significant step up from total production for the same week in 2016. Production last week was up 6.1% from the same week in 2016.

Copper Continues Surge

Copper continues to have a great 2017, recently hitting its two-year peak. According to CNBC, the metal jumped 7% in July alone.

A global supply deficit and a flagging dollar have supported copper prices this year.

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While some think copper could keep its momentum in the short term, many analysts predict a slowdown as the year progresses.

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This morning in metals news, the chairman of the Japan Iron and Steel Federation warns that U.S. tariffs on its steel imports could lead to retaliation, copper hit its five-month high and aluminum producer Norsk Hydro expects 2017 to present a balanced aluminum market.

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Section 232 Tariffs, If Instituted, Could Lead to Blowback

The world continues to wait for the Trump administration’s announcement regarding the conclusion of its Section 232 investigation into steel imports. Most, however, predict that tariffs will be the remedy President Donald Trump chooses, a course of action which EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom in recent weeks said would lead to retaliatory measures from the EU.

Japan has also joined the fray in warning of retaliation if tariffs are slapped onto steel coming into the U.S.

In a report from Industry Week, Kosei Shindo, chairman of the Japan Iron and Steel Federation, told reporters Monday that other countries could respond with protectionism on products other than steel, opening Pandora’s box.

Copper Riding High

Copper continues its strong run, hitting a five-month high Tuesday, Reuters reported.

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Positive news on the Chinese economy and a weak U.S. dollar contributed to the rise for copper.

Earlier today, our Stuart Burns wrote about copper’s big year to date.

A Balanced Market

Norsk Hydro CEO and President Svein Richard Brandtzaeg said he expects a “largely balanced” global aluminum market this year.

“We see a global primary aluminium deficit in the quarter. This is driven by increasing deficit outside China. For the full year, we are maintaining our 4-6 percent annual aluminium demand growth outlook for 2017 and expect a largely balanced, global aluminium market,” Brandtzæg said in the aluminum producer’s second-quarter results announcement.

Hydro, which earlier this month announced the acquisition of Sapa, reported second-quarter earnings of NOK 2,930 million.

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This morning in metals news, a team of researchers has developed a magnesium alloy that is billed to be at least 1.5 times stronger than aluminum sheet metal, copper is up and one analyst writes that China should not be the primary focus of the U.S. steel industry.

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A New Metal

Aluminum is renowned for its many qualities, including its strength, light weight and durability.

Now, scientists have developed a new magnesium alloy that appears to be even stronger than aluminum sheet metal.

According to a phys.org report, a team at NIMS and Nagaoka University of Technology has developed a high-strength magnesium sheet metal that “has excellent formability comparable to that of the aluminum sheet metal currently used in body panels of some automobiles.”

According to the report, the new magnesium alloy is lighter than aluminum and composed of common metals, making it a low-cost material.

Copper Gets a Boost

Copper rose Monday on news of supply disruptions and a weak dollar, according to Reuters.

The metal crossed the $6,000 dollar mark while the U.S. dollar approached 13-month lows.

Elsewhere, halting of mine operations also pushed prices up. In Chile, talks last week fizzled between union workers and management at the Zaldivar copper mine.

According to the report, the government-mediated talks will continue into this week.

China’s Not the Problem?

Ever since the Trump administration announced Section 232 investigations into steel and aluminum imports, China has been the primary focus. Chinese excess capacity, the administration and many in the U.S. aluminum and steel industries argue, has driven prices down worldwide and negatively impacted U.S. primary producers.

Clyde Russell, however, writing for Reuters, argues that China isn’t the U.S.’s biggest obstacle when it comes to strengthening its domestic steel industry.

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Russell points to statistics showing China’s relatively small U.S. market share, which even lags behind fellow Asian countries Japan, South Korea and India. In May, China was the 10th-largest supplier of steel products to the U.S., Russell writes.

Russell argues that rather than looking at China, the U.S. should focus on fellow North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) partners Canada and Mexico, which exported significantly more steel in May to the U.S. than did China.

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Before we dive into the weekend, let’s take a look back at the week in metals news:

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  • Our Stuart Burns started out the week with a piece on confirmation bias and how those in the media and metal-buying communities can sometimes let bias affect their interpretation of data.
  • What’s the diagnosis for the ailing U.K. steel industry? According to Burns, it’s a product of a lack of government support and global oversupply. A recent report showed that the U.K. steel industry has declined in monetary output value by 30% from 1990 to 2013.
  • In case you missed it, our July MMI report has long been in the books. You can download it here.
  • What did the recent G20 summit in Germany mean for India? Our Sohrab Darabshaw touched on the subject this week.
  • What’s up with oil prices? Unsurprisingly, as with the metal markets, prices are so low because there is just so much of the stuff out there. Burns dug deeper into oil price trends in a piece earlier this week.
  • What’s a Section 332? In short, it’s a fact-finding investigation by the United States International Trade Commission, which recently conducted a large-scale look into the competitive factors affecting the U.S. aluminum industry.
  • Another big story, the ongoing debate regarding a potential renegotiation of NAFTA, got an update this week when it was announced that the U.S., Canada and Mexico will come together for talks beginning Aug. 16.

Free Download: The July 2017 MMI Report