Articles in Category: Green

As part of its energy planning — especially on the oil and gas front — India has been actively looking at its neighbors in the past few months for support and supply.

Besides Russia, the other countries India is looking to for fulfilling its energy requirements is the United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.), Saudi Arabia and Qatar.

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On a visit of the U.A.E. earlier in the week, Dharmendra Pradhan, India’s minister of petroleum and natural gas and minister of steel, met his U.A.E. counterpart,Minister of Energy and Industry Suhail Mohamed Faraj Al Mazroui, and a host of other leaders from the region for talks on energy.

Pradhan also addressed the opening session of the 8th Asian Ministerial Energy Roundtable in Abu Dhabi on Tuesday.

Addressing the delegates at this conference, the Indian minister said he was sure that the shift in global energy consumption to Asia would be a reality soon.

Anticipating that, he said it is necessary for the change to be “rooted in energy justice,” a very important component of the energy vision of the present Indian government, the Orissa Diary reported.

He forecast that within the next two decades, Asia would be driving global economic growth, meaning developing economies would drive 80% of incremental global growth. India and China would be in the driver’s seat, accounting for more than half of that growth, he argued.

Thus, he said, it is imperative that low income, low per capita energy-consuming countries have access to technology and capital for their energy efficiency and clean tech plans. In turn, that access would provide better energy security than short-term interventions in fossil fuel supply and price, he said.

India’s energy vision, he explained, is based on four pillars: energy access, energy efficiency, energy sustainability and energy security. Energy justice was a major objective of this plan, he added, for which India had undertaken many initiatives.

India’s per capita consumption of energy is quite low compared with the global average. Pradhan said the Indian government is trying to improve the country’s energy supply to rectify the disparity.

India is the third-largest energy consumer in the world, with its share of total global primary energy demand set to double to 11% by 2040.

India has already laid down over 16,000 kilometers of gas pipeline and an additional 11,000 kilometers is under construction. The country is also aiming to produce 175 GW of renewable energy by 2022, with a solar target of 100 GW by 2022.

On his visit, Pradhan met Al Mazroui here and discussed ways of strengthening bilateral hydrocarbon engagement between the two countries.

India wants the U.A.E.’s increased participation in Phase II of India’s Strategic Petroleum Reserves Program coming up in India’s Odisha and Karnataka provinces, Sify reported (the U.A.E. is already a partner in Phase I).

According to news agency ANI, on Sept. 9, Pradhan met his Saudi counterpart Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman in Jeddah and discussed ways to boost energy ties between the countries.

Significantly, just a week prior to the minister’s Gulf visit, it was announced on a visit of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to Russia that a consortium of Indian companies led by state player ONGC Videsh would acquire a 49% stake in Russia’s Vankor cluster oilfields, Oil and Gas Eurasia reported.

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Modi Russian President Vladimir Putin agreed to the deal as part of a wider range of investment agreements signed at the Eastern Economic Forum in Vladivostok. It is worth noting the agreement comes after over three years of protracted negotiations with Russia. With this agreement in place, India is set to become a strategic player in this sector in the Arctic region.

The Renewables Monthly Metals Index (MMI) dropped two points for a September MMI value of 99.

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First Cobalt Eyes Restart of Canadian Refinery

First Cobalt Corp., a Toronto-based firm, is looking into restarting its idled cobalt refinery in Canada, Reuters reported.

First Cobalt CEO Trent Mell said the company will begin assessing the condition of the plant next week.

Last month, the Canadian firm reached an agreement with Glencore by which the latter would fund a feasibility study for the idled refinery.

“First Cobalt Corp. is pleased to announce that it has entered into a US$5 million loan facility with Glencore AG to complete advanced engineering, metallurgical testing, field work and permitting associated with a recommissioning and expansion of the First Cobalt Refinery in Canada,” First Cobalt said in a prepared statement Aug. 26. “Upon completion of a positive definitive feasibility study for a 55 tonnes per day (“tpd”) refinery expansion in Q1 2020 and subject to certain other terms and conditions and satisfaction of conditions precedent, Glencore is prepared to advance an additional US$40 million to recommission and expand the Refinery.”

As Reuters noted, once operational the refinery would become North America’s lone producer of refined cobalt for the electric vehicle sector.

Cobalt Prices Surge

Speaking of Glencore, its announcement of a planned shutdown of its Mutanda mine this year has seen cobalt prices reach six-month highs, Reuters reported.

Earlier this year, Glencore said it would halt production at the Mutanda cobalt and copper mine in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (where a majority of the world’s cobalt is mined); the site is the world’s largest cobalt mine.

LME cobalt, after reaching $95,000 per ton in March 2018, lost nearly 75% of its value over the next 16 months, falling to $25,000 as of late July. Recently, the price has picked up, rising to $34,750 per ton as of Sept. 6.

GOES Price Surges 7.4%

The MMI for grain-oriented electrical steel (GOES) jumped 14 points for a September reading of 199.

The U.S. GOES coil price rose 7.4% month over month to $2,745/mt as of Sept. 1.

German steelmaker Thyssenkrupp — a prominent producer of electrical steel — is facing a period of significant uncertainty, MetalMiner’s Stuart Burns recently explained.

Faced with financial challenges, the company is mulling its next steps, which include the possible sale of its profitable elevator business.

Evidence of its struggles, the German firm will be booted from the country’s blue-chip stock index, the DAX, later this month. Thyssen, which merged with Krupp in 1999, was a founding member of the DAX.

“For both suppliers and customers of the group, the most worrying development must be the gradual reduction in credit rating,” Burns wrote. “If suppliers cannot insure their debt, they cannot in many instances supply, thus forcing the group to diversify and fragment its supply base.

“The group has survived many trials and tribulations over the decades. It will no doubt survive the current period, but it will be a different, much reduced Thyssenkrupp that emerges in the decade ahead.”

Another giant in the elevator industry, Finland’s Kone, has hired a law firm to advise it during its planned takeover bid of Thyssenkrupp’s elevator business, Reuters reported Monday.

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Actual Metal Prices and Trends

U.S. steel plate rose 2.0% month over month to $797/st as of Sept. 1.

Chinese steel plate fell 5.6% to $577.25/mt. Korean steel plate increased 0.7% to $568.51/mt. Japanese steel plate gained 2.5% to $809.83/mt.

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This morning in metals news, China’s trade activity with respect to aluminum and copper slowed in August, Nucor announced Chairman and CEO John Ferriola will be retiring at the end of the calendar year and residents of an Arizona town expressed staunch opposition to a proposed aluminum recycling plant.

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China’s Aluminum Exports, Copper Imports Fall

China’s imports of copper and exports of aluminum fell in August as the trade war with the U.S. escalated with the most recent exchange of tariffs.

China’s copper imports fell 3.8% in August compared with the previous month, Reuters reported, while aluminum exports fell 4.3% compared with July totals.

Nucor CEO to Retire

Nucor Chairman and CEO John Ferriola will retire at the end of this year, the company reported.

Ferriola has served as chairman since 2014 and CEO since 2013.

Nucor’s Board of Directors elected Leon J. Topalian, 51, to be president and chief operating officer, effective Sept. 5, 2019. Topalian will succeed Ferriola as CEO on Jan. 1, 2020.

Residents Oppose Proposed Arizona Aluminum Recycling Plant

Locals in the Arizona farming town of Wenden have come out in opposition to an aluminum recycling plant proposed for the town, azcentral.com reported.

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According to the report, residents urged officials from the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality not to grant an air-quality permit for the proposed Alliance Metals plant.

Before we head into the Labor Day weekend, let’s take a look back at the week that was and some of the metals storylines here on MetalMiner:

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The U.K.’s Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) has issued a call for evidence to help inform a planned £250 million Clean Steel Fund.

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According to the BEIS, the fund will “support the UK steel sector to move to a decarbonisation pathway compatible with net zero.”

The government is seeking evidence to help it develop the “detailed design” of the fund, including feedback regarding potential “barriers to realising clean steel ambitions” and “the opportunities to be gained in overcoming these.”

The U.K. has set a target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 100% — compared with 1990 levels — by 2050, pursuant to the Climate Change Act of 2008.

According to the BEIS, the primary goals of the proposed Clean Steel Fund are to help facilitate the transition to “lower carbon iron and steel production” to help the sector reach net zero emissions (per the Climate Change Act) and to maximize “longevity and resilience” in the sector by “building on longstanding expertise and skills and harnessing clean growth opportunities.”

“We also intend to establish a new £100 million Low Carbon Hydrogen Production Fund, to support the deployment of low carbon hydrogen production at scale,” the BEIS said. “This could enable a pathway to lower carbon steel production and support broader efforts to decarbonise industry.”

UK Steel, an industry group that champions U.K. steelmaking, responded positively to the call for evidence.

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“Today’s announcement of the Clean Steel Fund is extremely positive news for UK steelmakers and the whole of the UK’s decarbonisation efforts,” UK Steel Director General Gareth Stace said. “The fund is a vital step towards further reducing our carbon footprint here in the UK and will cement our position in a future low-carbon world.”

The BEIS’s 22-page call for evidence document can be found here.

Following a decade of hype, there remains huge debate about the viability of carbon capture as a solution to carbon emissions from coal-fired power stations.

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A recent article in the Financial Times lays out both sides of the argument. On the one hand, there is the one put forward by the coal lobby, broadly drawing on the work of coal miners in the form of Coal21, an industry body in Australia backed by 26 mining groups (including BHP, Anglo American and Glencore). On the other hand, there is a more disparate group of academics, research bodies and NGOs who rubbish the miners’ position as untenable.

Coal21, however, is pouring a considerable amount of money into research, lobbying and, most controversially, marketing in an effort to influence the debate in its favor.

The industry club has invested $4 million in advertising to promote the prospects for carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) as a solution to coal’s carbon emissions. That comes in addition to some $400 million BHP has pledged over five years to reduce its emissions and those of its customers.

Meanwhile, Glencore, the world’s largest coal exporter, is building a pilot plant to capture and store carbon emissions from a nearby coal-fired power station in the Surat basin in Australia, funded in part by Coal21. The plan is to capture some 200,000 tons a year of carbon, but commercial projects in Canada and the U.S. are said to be running at 50% efficiency, at best (in one case, little more than 5%). Glencore will need new technology if it hopes to reach the 90% efficiency CCS plants are headlined to achieve.

Even then, grave doubts remain as to their economic viability for coal-fired power generation.

Source: Financial Times

CRU research is cited by the FT estimates the technology is only viable if the carbon dioxide (CO2) can be sold to other industries as a commercial source of CO2. Generally, it is either simply stored underground or used to boost oil field production by pumping sequestered CO2 back into oil reservoirs.

Without the value generated by selling CO2 to other industries, the cost of the technology needs to fall by 50% to make pure CO2 storage economical, the Financial Times reports. Cynics suggest miners’ focus on CCS as a solution has more to do with countering what they see as an increasingly negative view of coal use as the consequences of rising CO2 levels is more widely accepted.

Coal miners may be facing a losing battle, regardless of public perceptions.

The article reports that in many parts of the world, solar, wind and battery storage produces electricity at lower cost than coal, not to mention the advantages of lower CO2 producing natural gas and the latter’s greater flexibility to provide swing production to balance renewables’ lower predictability.

Although huge sums have been poured into CCS research and multiple pilot plants have been set up around the world, the technology is still less efficient than necessary and more expensive to operate than required if it is to be economical (certainly for coal-fired power generation).

But there are other industries where large quantities of CO2 are generated. The arguments for CCS may be on a firmer footing for industries like cement, steel, and oil and gas.

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If the technology can be further refined to reduce emission from these industries, that would be a huge gain — but for coal-fired power stations, CCS looks like a lost cause.

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This morning in metals news, China Molybdenum is facing a number of pressures at its copper and cobalt mine in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Norsk Hydro announced new certifications for several of its aluminum plants and profits have fallen at Australian miner South32 Ltd. amid falling aluminum prices.

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Falling Prices Weigh on China Molybdenum

China Molybdenum, operator of the Tenke Fungurume mine in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, is facing falling prices of both copper and cobalt.

According to Bloomberg, the miner said falling prices and higher taxes and royalties have placed the operation in a “deficit zone.”

Hydro Aluminum Plants Receive ASI Certification

Five Norsk Hydro aluminum plants have been granted Aluminum Stewardship Initiative (ASI) certification.

“This ASI Chain of Custody certification marks a crucial milestone in Hydro’s commitment to certify that aluminum our customers buy from Hydro is manufactured according to industry-leading standards of responsibility and sustainability,” said Eivind Kallevik, Hydro’s executive vice president for primary metal.

According to the firm, it now has 16 ASI-certified plants in six countries.

South32 Profits Down

Australian miner South32 saw its share price fall as much as 5.8% Thursday, Reuters reported, and posted a 25% drop in annual profit.

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The miner has struggled with falling aluminum prices and the fallout from the U.S.-China trade war, according to the report.

Source: The Coca-Cola Company

This morning in metals news, beverage maker Coca-Cola has announced it will shift to aluminum cans for its Dasani water brand, the U.S. Department of Commerce announced it found evidence of dumping of refillable stainless steel kegs from Mexico and China still plans to send trade officials to Washington next month for talks.

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Coca-Cola Announces New Dasani Packaging

In an effort to reduce plastic use and increase the use of recyclable materials, Coca-Cola announced plans to shift its Dasani water brand’s packaging from plastic bottles to aluminum.

“Updates to DASANI’s packaging line-up are designed to reduce plastic waste and increase the use of recycled and renewable materials in the United States, while ensuring that all DASANI bottles continue to be fully recyclable,” the company said.

Under the beverage maker’s proposed “World Without Waste” program, it aims to produce make its bottles and cans with an average of 50% recycled material by 2030. The company will roll out the water brand in aluminum cans in the northeastern U.S. in the fall (and 2020 everywhere else), and aluminum bottles in mid-2020.

U.S. Rules on Stainless Steel Keg Dumping Case

The U.S. Department of Commerce announced it had found evidence of dumping with respect to imports of stainless steel kegs from Mexico.

According to the department, the kegs were sold at less than fair value in the U.S. at a rate of 18.48%.

Last year, imports of the kegs from Mexico were valued at $13.4 million, according to the Department of Commerce.

China to Continue with Planned September Meetings

Despite the recent U.S. announcement of tariffs on an additional $300 billion in Chinese goods, Chinese trade officials still plan to visit Washington in September as planned, Bloomberg reported.

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However, according to a source cited by Bloomberg, China is unlikely to make concessions next month.

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The Renewables Monthly Metals Index (MMI) fell four points this month for an August reading of 101.

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Glencore Shakes up Cobalt Market

As covered by MetalMiner’s Stuart Burns, Glencore announced it would halt production by the end of the year at the world’s largest cobalt mine: Glencore’s Mutanda operation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

Last week, the miner reported its adjusted EBITDA for the first half of the year came in at $5.6 billion, down 32% on a year-over-year basis, with CEO Ivan Glasenberg citing “a challenging economic backdrop.”

Among the challenges has been a plummeting cobalt price. As a result, the miner announced it will move toward pausing production at its Mutanda copper and cobalt mine.

“However, our African copper business did not meet expected operational performance,” Glasenberg said. “We have moved to address the challenges at Katanga and Mopani with several management changes as well as overseeing a detailed operational review, targeting multiple improvements to achieve consistent, cost-efficient production at design capacity.

“Our teams have identified a credible roadmap towards delivering on the significant cashflow generation potential of these assets, at targeted steady state production levels. At Mutanda, we are planning to transition the operation to temporary care and maintenance by year end, reflecting its reduced economic viability in the current market environment, primarily in response to low cobalt prices.”

So, what kind of impact will the removal of Mutanda’s cobalt — making up a whopping 20% of global supply — have on the market? Burns explained Glencore’s closure of zinc mines in 2015 is credited with the recovery of that market, so there is precedent for the maneuver.

In addition, the electric vehicle (EV) revolution hasn’t taken off perhaps as much as expected.

“Cobalt demand has traditionally been driven by its use as an alloying element, but it is increasingly being seen as part of the lithium battery demand story because of its role in production of advanced batteries,” Burns said. “The electric vehicle (EV) market, though, has failed to match up to its hype this decade. Although both lithium and cobalt prices have risen as a result of battery makers securing their supply chain, the reality is supply is perfectly adequate.”

GOES

Meanwhile, the GOES MMI, which tracks grain-oriented electrical steel, picked up six points for an August reading of 197.

The U.S. GOES price hit $2,719/mt as of Aug. 1, up 3.2% from the previous month.

A.K. Steel, the lone remaining electrical steel producer in the U.S., announced its second-quarter earnings late last month. The firm brought in net income of $66.8 million in 2018, up from $56.6 million in Q2 2018.

Shipments in its stainless/electrical segment were down, however, coming in at 198,400 tons in Q2 2019, down from 221,500 tons in Q2 2018. For the first six months of the year, shipments amounted to 405,000 tons, down from 422,200 tons in the first half of 2018.

Meanwhile, German firm Thyssenkrupp, also a producer of electrical steel (with plants in Germany, India and France), has announced it will continue to move forward with realignment plans amid disappointing quarterly results.

For the quarter ending June 30, 2019, the firm’s adjusted EBIT came in at €226 million, down 32% from the €331 million for the same quarter in 2018.

In addition, the firm revised its full-year 2018-2019 forecast down to €0.8 billion from the previous forecast of €1.1 billion-€1.2 billion.

In addition to improving performance, the firm cited its planned partial IPO of its elevator business in 2019-2020 and efforts to improve organizational efficiency as part of its realignment efforts.

“The most important portfolio measure is the planned partial IPO of Elevator Technology,” the company said. “This will allow thyssenkrupp to sustainably strengthen its capital base and make the value of its elevator business visible. By retaining a majority interest, the Group will also continue to profit from future value growth. With the expected proceeds, the Group will increase its financial leeway for necessary restructuring and securing the future of its businesses.”

Actual Metal Prices and Trends

Japanese steel plate fell 0.4% month over month to $790.22/mt as of Aug. 1. Korean steel plate fell 5.4% to $564.33/mt. Chinese steel fell 1.2% to $611.40/mt.

U.S. steel plate dropped 9.8% to $781/st.

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Chinese neodymium dropped 13.7% to $55,911.60/mt. Chinese silicon fell 0.3% to $1,495.82/mt. Chinese cobalt cathodes fell 0.3% to $96,574.60/mt.

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This morning in metals news, the latest round of U.S.-China trade talks wrapped up Wednesday, steel companies are not reducing emissions fast enough and analysts cut their copper forecast for fourth-quarter prices.

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U.S., China Conclude Talks in Shanghai

Trade negotiators from the U.S. and China wrapped up yet another round of trade talks this week in Shanghai.

In a statement, China’s Ministry of Commerce described the talks as a “constructive and deep exchange on major trade and economic issues of mutual interest,” Reuters reported.

According to the report, the Ministry of Commerce also said the two sides agreed to meet again in September.

Steel Industry and Carbon Regulations

As the global focus on climate change intensifies, steel companies are not reducing their emissions quickly enough, according to a new report by CDP cited by CNBC.

According to the report, steel companies are not doing enough to avoid a rise of 2 degrees Celsius, a fact that could have an impact on their bottom lines.

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In Europe, for example, the carbon price has tripled since last year, according to the report.

Copper Price Forecast

Analysts polled by Reuters were bearish on the copper price this year, recently forecasting an average fourth-quarter LME price of $6,291 per ton.

The fourth-quarter price forecast for copper marked a 5.4% decline from a previous forecast in May.