Articles in Category: Public Policy

What with news of the terrorist massacre in Manchester reverberating around the world, while President Donald Trump first snuggles up to the Saudis and then to the Israelis — it is hardly surprising that news of yet a fourth Greek bailout has failed to make much headway in the headlines.

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News that the International Monetary Fund (IMF) is working on a compromise with Greece’s creditors that would smooth the way for a €7 billion ($7.8 billion) disbursement of rescue cash all sounds rather calming and reassuring. But rest assured Greece is in danger of yet another default this summer as it seeks to get its hands on the latest tranche of an €86 billion rescue package to meet debt obligations this July.

According to an article in The Telegraph, Greece’s debt currently stands at nearly 180% of gross domestic product. The Greek economy fell back into recession in the first quarter of 2017, and it is an economy that is still some 27% smaller than in 2008, crushed under the EU-IMF austerity program.

According to the Associated Press, the IMF has argued that the Eurozone forecasts underpinning the Greek bailout are too rosy and that the country as a result should get substantial debt relief so it can start growing on a sustainable basis. The Greek economy has spent more time in recession than growth since the financial crisis.

The Eurozone, on the other hand, has so far ruled out any debt write-off, saying it would rather extend Greece’s repayment periods or reduce the interest rates on its loans after the bailout next year. Germany and the Netherlands are keen to avoid debt relief, probably because they do not want to set a precedent that others such as Italy could turn to later to solve their own problems. Read more

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This morning in metal news, a new report paints a positive picture for jobs in the renewables sector, Moody’s downgrades China’s credit rating, and the results of the OPEC meeting are in. The current supply cuts will be extended for another nine months, and oil prices tumbled on the news.

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OPEC Agrees on 9-Month Extension of Supply Cuts

Let’s start with the big headline of the morning. As expected, the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) has agreed to extend supply cuts for another nine months, until March 2018.

After OPEC wrapped up its first meeting in Vienna around 3:30pm CEDT (8:30am CDT), oil prices responded over the next few hours by sliding 4.5% to $51.60 per barrel. Some industry analysts think OPEC should have agreed to deeper cuts. As The Guardian reported, OPEC is “sticking to the 1.8 [million] barrel a deal first agreed in late November.” Russia and other oil producing non-OPEC members are also expected to go along with the supply cuts.

Forget Bringing Back Coal Jobs

The burgeoning renewable energy sector employed 9.8 million people in 2016, according to the latest annual report released by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). Global employment in the sector has been growing every year since 2013, and there may be as many as 24 million renewables workers worldwide by 2030. Read more

There have been some doubts over India’s stated plans to triple its steel production capacity by 2030. The Indian cabinet recently passed a revamped policy to the extent.

While some have welcomed the document, other sector experts have expressed uncertainty over the projections in the policy.

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Ratings agency Crisil, for example, said in a statement that the ambition to add 182 million tons of new steel capacities over the next 14 years under the National Steel Policy was unlikely to be achieved. Crisil’s doubts seem logical. After all, India has managed to add capacity at the annual rate of 55 million tons in the last decade.

The National Steel Policy 2017 projects crude steel production capacity of 300 million tons by 2030-31 from the present level of about 120 million tons and per-capita consumption of 158 kilograms of finished steel as against the current consumption of 61 kilograms. The policy also sees an increase in domestic availability of washed coking coal by 2030-31.

Crisil Research said that it expects 24-26 million tons of steel capacities to be added over the next five years, leading to aggregate steel capacity to rise to 140-145 million tons by 2021-22. Beyond this, Crisil said, the key factors that would determine the pace of capacity addition would be demand growth, continued government support, and pricing environment against the backdrop of global overcapacity led by China. Crisil has also projected a 6-6.5% growth in steel demand in India over the next five years, lower than the 7% annual growth rate projected by the government till 2030. Read more

Regular readers of The Telegraph, arguably Britain’s only remaining decent broadsheet paper, will be familiar with the writings of Ambrose Evans Prichard, the international business editor.

It has to be said that he has a slightly sensationalist reporting style, but his articles are always liberally supported with facts and figures. Even though he seems to argue more often than not that markets about to drop off the edge of a cliff, he has, at times, been right. Yet an article this week titled “Commodities slump on China tremors and OPEC failure,” while making a plausible argument based on the facts and figures presented, could equally have an alternate explanation if one looks over a slightly longer timeframe.

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Clyde Russel of Reuters takes just such an approach in an article posted just a day or so later, which all goes to underline the challenge for buyers in interpreting fundamental supply and demand data and extrapolating workable strategies.

Source: The Telegraph

The Telegraph looks at a gradually sinking Brent oil price coupled with falling Chinese crude oil imports, and it suggests that the former is in part a result of the latter. Reuters looks at the same data, and whilst the article acknowledges that imports are down in April, it goes on to look at the last 12 months trend line.

Reuters notes that in the first four months of 2017, crude oil imports were up 12.5% from the same period last year to around 8.46 million bpd. The article goes on to point out that this is also substantially higher than the 7.6 million bpd imports averaged for 2016, suggesting that China’s appetite for crude has jumped substantially so far this year, notwithstanding the pullback in April. Read more

President Donald Trump has come in for a fair amount of criticism for his perceived failure to achieve many of his campaign promises in the 100-day deadline he set himself (and now denies, but that’s another issue).

Implementation of a case against China as a currency manipulator and building the U.S.-Mexico border wall has given way to the greater pragmatism of coercing China to put pressure on North Korea with both carrot and stick incentives, and of a “last minute” retraction of a supposed imminent announcement to withdraw from the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) last month as a precursor to talks down the line.

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The Economist, as usual, gives an impartial and balanced assessment of events in two recent articles. The first reports that although the president has not been able to implement much of the headline objectives, the combination of executive orders, tweets and off-the-cuff announcements have set in motion a number of significant developments.

Pulling out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) gave a clear message from day one that here was a president who meant what he said — that you took all the bluster as hot air at your peril. The very uncertainty in his lack of planned policy and spur-of-the-moment reaction to events has put trade partners, friends and enemies alike on uncertain ground — not a bad negotiating position to force on the other side, if you see all interaction as a negotiation.

More significantly, the U.S. has started an investigation into whether steel imports are a threat to national security and followed up with a similar probe, announced late last month, into aluminium imports. Trade negotiators at home and abroad are said to be aghast at the former leader of the rules-based trading system and a major backer of the World Trade Organization completely shunning the system it created and resorting to obscure legislation to achieve the president’s promises. Read more

Proposals based on environmental grounds to limit polluting industries in the greater Beijing area during next winter’s primary heating period (November to March) gave a boost to the aluminum market from the moment they were first mooted last year.

Beijing’s robust implementation of environmental audits and regulation of aluminum plants this year have added to a sense that the authorities are getting serious about pollution and the environmental impact of energy intensive industries like aluminum smelting. But, as Reuter’s columnist Andy Home opined, it is protectionism in the rest of the world that is going to add backbone to these trends and act as the driving force behind further action on Beijing’s part.

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In an article this week, Home explained how the latest investigation into aluminum imports, along the same lines as an earlier steel case, has been launched under Section 232(b) of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, which lets a president act against imports on national security grounds. The reasoning is the U.S. has but one smelter left in operation, Century’s Kentucky smelter, capable of producing the high grades required for defence and aerospace companies making combat aircraft and the like.

China supplies almost no primary aluminum to the U.S. market. Following U.S. smelter closures, surging imports are being increasingly met by Russia and the United Arab Emirates, while the bulk continues to be supplied by Canada, as the graph below from Reuters shows.

Where China has an impact is in semi-finished products, such as sheet, plate, foil, bars, tubes and sections. Here the growth of Chinese exports to the world — and U.S. imports — has been much more significant. According to Home, on that measure China has been by some margin the largest-volume supplier to the U.S. market in recent years. Read more

President Donald J. Trump has completed his first 100 days in office and thus far has signed into law 28 pieces of legislation.

While Trump has made traction in some respects, the fate of the nation’s steel industry was still up in the air — that is, until Trump signed a Presidential Memorandum in late April calling on Department of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to prioritize an investigation into the effects of steel imports on U.S. national security.

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Here are three things you should know about this directive and what it could mean for the nation’s steel industry.

The Trade Expansion Act of 1962

The investigation is being conducted under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962. According to the Department of Commerce, Ross is tasked with determining the following:

  • “Whether steel imports cause American workers to lose jobs needed to meet security requirements of the domestic steel industry;
  • Any negative effects of steel imports on government revenue; and
  • Any harm steel imports cause to the economic welfare of the U.S.”

The Current Situation

Despite an existing steel industry, steel imports saw a 19.6% year-over-year increase in February, and, currently, imported steel accounts for 26% of the U.S. market share, according to the Department of Commerce.

Further, the U.S. steel industry is only operating at 71% capacity, and jobs in the industry has continued to take a steady hit. Read more

The 100-day mark for President Donald Trump’s administration has come and passed. When it comes to the effects of his policies on various markets, only one thing is certain: uncertainty.

That uncertainty also applies to non-ferrous metal markets, which saw a boom in optimism after Trump’s election last year. For example, copper rose to a 15-month high on Nov. 9, 2016. However, that optimism has dwindled through the first few months of his administration, due to lingering uncertainty over the administration’s ability to actuate campaign promises.

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While market fluctuations are a confluence of many forces, beyond what the president does or does not do, the president does have substantial influence, both in word and deed. Thus far, Trump has been more influential in the former, campaigning on a renewed focus on mining (particularly with respect to coal) and significant investment in American infrastructure.

“We are going to fix our inner cities and rebuild our highways, bridges, tunnels, airports, schools, hospitals,” Trump had said during his victory speech in November. “We’re going to rebuild our infrastructure, which will become, by the way, second to none. And we will put millions of our people to work as we rebuild it.” Read more

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International trade hasn’t been this contentious since before the Great Depression, and it is causing free traders much concern. We’ve seen a number of trade cases affect some U.S. imports such that the U.S. steel industry effectively implemented a full ground stop on many steel products (though that ground stop has been short-lived). Some political appointments have caused a backlash amongst some free-trade Republicans, importers, traders and manufacturers.

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This administration’s stance on trade has helped galvanize both the case for and against trade. These arguments are centered on several themes related to the notion that China’s loss is U.S. value-added manufacturers’ gain — if China chooses to “dump” its products at a loss, then shouldn’t value-added manufacturers take the opportunity to purchase [steel and/or other commodities] to increase their overall cost competitiveness on finished goods?

Read more

This morning in metals news, we’ve seen a major U.S. auto supplier snap up a European counterpart just before the weekend, the EPA Clean Power Plan’s swan song stalled a bit, and more.

Lear Corp. and Grupo Antolin Marriage Consummated

Lear Corporation, one of the world’s leading suppliers of automotive seating systems and electrical distribution systems, went final on its acquisition of Grupo Antolin’s automotive seating business just last Friday.

According to a press release, Grupo Antolin has a large footprint with Europe’s largest carmakers, including Daimler, Peugeot Citroen, Renault Nissan and Volkswagen, and the acquisition will help Lear double down on its core business. “The transaction is valued at €286 million on a cash and debt free basis and is forecasted to be accretive to 2017 earnings per share,” according to the release.

Incidentally, Lear Corp. is not only one of the biggest auto suppliers, but one of the most resilient — the company is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year.

EPA Clean Power Plan Court Battle on Pause?

A federal court’s recent ruling has given environmentalists a bit of a reprieve to look over their options, as the impending court battle to get rid of the Obama administration’s chief piece of environmental regulation takes a break (paywall).

President Trump used an executive order in late March to dismantle the Obama administration’s climate change agenda, according to Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt. As MetalMiner reported at the time, the action will order several other federal agencies to undo the Obama administration’s climate change work: It will tell the Interior Department to end a moratorium on new coal leasing on federal land, the official said, and the Obama administration’s assault on methane emissions — outlined in early 2014 and overseen by Interior and EPA — will be ended, too.

EPA’s CPP, as it came to be known, could have had far-ranging consequences on U.S. manufacturing, especially on heavier emitters such as the steel industry, if enacted to its fullest.

China’s Copper Appetite Shifting from Refined Metal to…?

Reuters’ Andy Home examines how the 28 percent year-on-year drop in China’s imports of refined copper in Q1 2017 don’t tell the whole story of that country’s love affair with the red metal. In fact, China has shifted its focus to copper scrap, among other things. Read Home’s full analysis here.

And don’t forget to check back in tomorrow morning, May 2, to get a free trial of the latest edition of our Monthly Outlook Report — including forward-looking copper market analysis and buying strategies.