Articles in Category: Logistics
Shipping

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Shipping lines were thrown into chaos by coronavirus lockdowns — first in Asia, then Europe and finally in the U.S. Read more

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The shipping industry’s woes started before the current pandemic.

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Let’s take a look back at the week that was and some of the metals storylines here on MetalMiner:

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An intriguing article by McKinsey headlines by asking what the future holds for the U.S. road haulage industry post-COVID-19 but in so doing goes on to illustrate an industry in long-term decline.

The collapse in industrial activity has hit the freight transportation and logistics industry hard these last few months, but freight’s problems have been on a slow burn for much longer.

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Before we head into the weekend, let’s take a look back at the week that was and some of the metals storylines here on MetalMiner:

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This morning in metals news, German firm Thyssenkrupp announced the sale of its elevator segment, the U.S.’s trade deficit in goods dipped in January and the International Tin Association recently surveyed tin producers regarding the impact of the coronavirus outbreak.

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It probably had to happen at some stage.

As we wrote recently, it isn’t the coronavirus epidemic as much as the response to it that is causing a collapse in supply chains.

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The decision to shut down roads and quarantine cities across China has caused delays in workers returning to factories and those factories receiving raw materials.

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Thought you had the China supply risks covered? More than one supplier, multiple logistics options, natural disaster contingency planning… yep? Try this: employee arrest and detention.

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Here’s What Happened

As we reported soon after it happened last week, the Bureau of Consular Affairs under the U.S. Department of State has issued a warning of an increased risk of arbitrary arrest and detention when U.S. citizens, particularly those of dual nationality, come to leave China. According to the notice, Chinese authorities have asserted broad authority to prohibit U.S. citizens from leaving China by using ‘exit bans.’ The post states China uses exit bans coercively:

  1. “To compel U.S. citizens to participate in Chinese government investigations,
  2. To lure individuals back to China from abroad, and
  3. To aid Chinese authorities in resolving civil disputes in favor of Chinese parties.”

According to the notice, U.S. citizens may be detained without access to U.S. consular services or information about their alleged crime. U.S. citizens may be subjected to prolonged interrogations and extended detention for reasons related to “state security.”

Why It Happened

Sounds serious, doesn’t it? But to be fair, the current notice is largely a repeat of one issued the same time last year and China retains a Level 2 caution, according to U.S. authorities — meaning two out of four travelers should “exercise increased caution” when in the country. This is a warning that has at times applied to parts of Europe due to a perceived risk from terrorism.

According to Conde Nast Traveler, the advisory follows high-profile cases in December in which two Canadian businessmen, Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig, were detained for unspecified reasons, citing a Reuters report. Both Kovrig and Spavor remain in detention in China and are awaiting trial, with the U.S. and Canada calling for their release. In total, some 13 Canadians have been detained of late in moves said to be linked to the arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou.

Some put the restatement of the travel advisory down to increased trade tensions between the U.S. and China following President Trump’s trade war, but while such issues don’t help, the reality is China has always imposed strict censorship laws and still rigidly controls free speech. It uses such laws in situations that Western societies find arbitrary and unrelated, but the Chinese no doubt brought in the laws with the express intention of giving them a catch-all legal framework to bring leverage if they felt an individual, company or even country was not acting in China’s best interests.

What It Means for Metal Buyers

Buying organizations should, from time to time, be reminded that China is not a benign democracy, but an autocratic single-party state controlled by an increasingly powerful centrist elite.

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The West’s view that China would become progressively more liberal and democratic over time has proved to be fundamentally flawed — and with that realization, our perception of risk for employees and contractors we send or employ there should change too.

McKinsey is a highly respected firm of consultants, but we rarely report findings of its work because the material released into the public domain is often too generalist for our practitioners at the coal face of metal procurement.

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Arguably, a recent article on the future of containerization could be said to be in the same vein, comparing as it does their findings in 1967 to today and weighing up current trends extrapolating how the industry could change over the next 50 years. Fifty years is a long time — many of us won’t even be working anymore by then — but of course changes will happen gradually over the period. Some of the developments they mention are already in process today.

Careful not to make specific predictions, McKinsey suggest the following may happen by 2067. Like cars, the firm sees ships becoming autonomous — a scary thought, but, realistically, if you can do it with trucks and cars, why not boats?

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President Donald Trump said today that his administration has approved the Keystone XL pipeline, reversing the Obama administration’s decision to block the oil transportation project.

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Speaking from the Oval Office, Trump officially announced the approval shortly after the State Department issued TransCanada‘s permit, making good on one of his campaign promises. The approval greenlights the Canadian company to complete construction on the pipeline that will funnel crude oil from Canada to refineries on the Gulf Coast.

The American Petroleum Institute praised the approval.

“Today’s action to approve the Keystone XL pipeline’s cross-border permit is welcome news and is critical to creating American jobs, growing the economy, and making our nation more energy secure,” said API President and CEO Jack Gerard. “This critical infrastructure project has been studied longer than any pipeline project in U.S. history with exhaustive reviews by the State Department concluding that the project is safe for the environment and the best option for transporting domestic crude and Canadian oil to U.S. refineries.”

The 1,179-mile addition to existing pipelines that will stretch from Alberta, Canada to the U.S. Gulf Coast is estimated to create 42,000 construction jobs but only 35 full-time, maintenance positions once it’s completed.

Lopez Allows Suspended Mines to Ship Out Stockpiled Nickel Ore

The Philippines’ environment ministry, led by Environment and Natural Resources Secretary Regina Lopez, has allowed eight suspended nickel ore miners to ship out stockpiles of mined ore, sources told Reuters, temporarily boosting supply from the world’s top exporter of the raw metal after a major crackdown.

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More than half of all the mines in the Philippines have been ordered to permanently shut to protect watersheds in an eight-month campaign led by Lopez.